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  • #76
    Originally posted by Mordoror View Post
    Not an M.D.
    I have a doctorare in Infectious diseases (parasitology and medical mycology speciality) though. And work a lot in relationship with clinical structures, pharmacists, M.Ds and internists
    Technically and historically a PHD is a real doctor, M.Ds are not a true doctor. But we won't go there.

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    • #77
      A pretty interesting short summary of the problem of antibiotics resistance:


      "The Plan to Avert Our Post-Antibiotic Apocalypse"

      http://www.theatlantic.com/science/a...alypse/483360/

      "The report’s language is sober but its numbers are apocalyptic. If antibiotics continue to lose their sting, resistant infections will sap $100 trillion from the world economy between now and 2050, equivalent to $10,000 for every person alive today. Ten million people will die every year, roughly one every three seconds, and more than currently die from cancer. These are conservative estimates: They don’t account for procedures that are only safe or possible because of antibiotics, like hip and joint replacements, gut surgeries, C-sections, cancer chemotherapy, and organ transplants."




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      • #78
        Originally posted by Mordoror View Post
        Not an M.D.
        I have a doctorare in Infectious diseases (parasitology and medical mycology speciality) though. And work a lot in relationship with clinical structures, pharmacists, M.Ds and internists
        Cool.
        Anyway you have to admit that idea of infecting bacteria with viruses sounds so crazy that it actually might work

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        • #79
          Originally posted by Mashiach View Post

          Cool.
          Anyway you have to admit that idea of infecting bacteria with viruses sounds so crazy that it actually might work
          It works and it's an "old" technology. It's called phage-therapy. Pretty common in SU (due to lack of imported antibiotics).

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          • #80
            Originally posted by Mordoror View Post

            It works and it's an "old" technology. It's called phage-therapy. Pretty common in SU (due to lack of imported antibiotics).
            Yeah, it seems Im a bit late. Some 100 years...

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            • #81
              New Life Found That Lives Off Electricity

              http://www.quantamagazine.org/201606...in-odd-places/

              In the darkness found a mile underground, the pair traversed the mine’s network of passages in search of a rusty metal pipe. They siphoned some of the pipe’s ancient water, directed it into a vessel, and inserted a variety of electrodes. They hoped the current would lure their prey, a little-studied microbe that can live off pure electricity.

              The electricity-eating microbes that the researchers were hunting for belong to a larger class of organisms that scientists are only beginning to understand. They inhabit largely uncharted worlds: the bubbling cauldrons of deep sea vents; mineral-rich veins deep beneath the planet’s surface; ocean sediments just a few inches below the deep seafloor. The microbes represent a segment of life that has been largely ignored, in part because their strange habitats make them incredibly difficult to grow in the lab.

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              • #82
                Always wondered why bacteria and archeae cant form large organisms the way eukaryotes do?

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                • #83
                  Originally posted by Mashiach View Post
                  Always wondered why bacteria and archeae cant form large organisms the way eukaryotes do?
                  Some can grow large : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thiomargarita_namibiensis

                  They just can't grow large organisms for several reasons
                  An organism means specialisations of different kind of cells : procaryotes are not specialised
                  In life either your cell is multipurpose (case of bacterias and some protozoa) either it is specialised in key functions (reproduction, digestion, food capture, signal treatment). You can't have both

                  Second point needed to form a large organism : you need an efficient communication system; Although bacterias can and do communicate among themseleves, their com system is still primitive

                  Last point : to form large organisms you need a system to have the cells sticking to each others and group each others by specs AND the ability to form a skeleton (internal, external or hydrostatic). While bacterias can stick together to form some communities (biofilms) they really lack a mean to form a skeleton (because to have a skeleton, you need somehow specialisation)

                  And yet you can say that stromatolites (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stromatolite) are the closest of what you can get as a large "organsim" with bacterias and archea. After all it is not very different in structure from some primitive sponges
                  Last edited by Mordoror; 22-06-2016, 03:16 AM.

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                  • #84
                    Oh we're so f'd:
                    http://www.bbc.com/news/health-37057934
                    The Zika virus has been found in the sperm of an Italian man six months after his first symptoms, twice as long as in previously reported cases.

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                    • #85
                      Originally posted by Chomiq View Post
                      Better Zika than Ebola (that does the same thing ...)

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                      • #86
                        UN admits role in Haiti's cholera outbreak


                        Scientific studies have shown that Nepalese UN troops were the source of the disease - but the UN repeatedly denied responsibility until now...But the UN still says it is protected by diplomatic immunity from claims for compensation from victims' families.
                        They had to have seen it coming, and it's pretty poor form to cling to their diplomatic immunity. I think offering compensation and also making public the plan (if there is one) to fix their f-k up would go a long way to helping right this massive wrong. It's just tragic.

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                        • #87
                          Every year is a new challenge for our certitudes
                          After the giant viruses : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megavirus, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pandoravirus
                          After the sputnik viruses (or virophages) viruses infecting other viruses : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sputnik_virophage
                          Now you have the broken up virus :
                          Human viruses are like a fine chocolate truffle: It takes only one to get the full experience.
                          At least, that's what scientists thought a few days ago. Now a new study published Thursday is making researchers rethink how some viruses could infect animals.
                          A team at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases has found a mosquito virus that's broken up into pieces. And the mosquito needs to catch several of the pieces to get an infection.
                          "It's the most bizarre thing," says Edward Holmes, a virologist at the University of Sydney, who wasn't involved in the study. It's like the virus is dismembered, he says.
                          "If you compare it to the human body, it's like a person would have their legs, trunk and arms all in different places," Holmes says. "Then all the pieces come together in some way to work as one single virus. I don't think anything else in nature moves this way."
                          Link : http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsand...s-of-infection

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                          • #88
                            Originally posted by Mordoror View Post
                            Every year is a new challenge for our certitudes
                            After the giant viruses : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megavirus, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pandoravirus
                            After the sputnik viruses (or virophages) viruses infecting other viruses : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sputnik_virophage
                            Now you have the broken up virus :


                            Link : http://www.npr.org/sections/goatsand...s-of-infection
                            'tis extremely interesting. Around 4 years ago, we had a lenghty discussion about such a possibility with a friend at class. Lecturer thought the idea was silly

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                            • #89
                              Scientists like Barack Obama so much that they named a parasite after him

                              Other presidents have mountains named after them. They're the namesakes for high schools, boulevards, space centers, libraries, airports, and elk. George Washington has the capital of our country named for him, for crying out loud.
                              But how many of them have the dubious honor of being the namesake for a parasitic worm?
                              World, meet Baracktrema obamai, a deadly turtle pathogen named in honor of our current president. Believe it or not, it's supposed to be a compliment.
                              The new genus and species of parasitic flatworm was introduced this week in an article in the Journal of Parasitology. The tiny creatures, which are the thickness of a human hair, invade the lungs of freshwater turtles in Malaysia, often with deadly consequences.
                              Rest here : https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...ite-after-him/

                              LoL........

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                              • #90
                                Mother Nature is firghtening, sometimes

                                Virus Uses Stolen DNA From Black Widow Spider Venom


                                http://www.iflscience.com/plants-and...-spider-venom/
                                In what may be the greatest biological weapons heist of all time, scientists have discovered a virus that steals DNA from black widow spiders in order to help it attack its victims.
                                The virus, known as WO, is a bacteriophage, meaning it only infects bacteria and can’t enter the eukaryotic cells of more complex organisms. Eukaryotes are cells that contain a nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles.
                                Though it is not uncommon for viruses to incorporate some of their host’s genes into their own DNA, it had been assumed that bacteriophages could only take DNA from bacteria, which is why the discovery of the gene for black widow venom in the WO genome is so puzzling.
                                Seth Bordenstein, who co-authored a paper about the discovery with his wife Sarah, told Live Science that “this is the first time, to the best of my knowledge, that animal genes were found in bacteriophages.”
                                WO infects a type of bacteria called Wolbachia, which lives inside the cells of black widows and many other arthropods. As such, the virus needs to be able to penetrate the membranes of these bacteria as well as the cells of the animals that host them. It also needs to avoid being detected and destroyed by the immune system of these arthropods.
                                Rest in the link

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