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  • Originally posted by IraGlacialis View Post

    Azhdarchid?
    Gesundheit !!

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    • Originally posted by IraGlacialis View Post

      Azhdarchid?
      No clue. Too delicate to mess http://www.airliners.net/photo/Untit...-3Y0/2613330it out here, so I'm gonna send it to mr. Dakotaraptor in a few weeks. Strangely in the Hell Creek it could also be a Pteranodontid (or I guess technically an Ornithochirid).

      Found a triceratops predentary and squamous Almaty the site. So much better than digging up whole trike skulls.

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      • Originally posted by commanding View Post

        Gesundheit !!
        Hah!

        I actually suggest you to look them up, especially Quetzalcoatlus; it's a Texas native after all.

        Simultaneously one of the most awesome yet awkward looking beasts.

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        • Squamousal not squamous Almaty.. Stupid tablet.

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          • New Fossils-Related Page

            Well, relatively new. Not too long ago I uploaded to http://inyo2.coffeecup.com/fossilval...silvalley.html a page titled, "A Visit To Fossil Valley, Great Basin Desert, Nevada." Includes a detailed text; images of fossils, plus on-site photographs, as well.


            Fossil Valley is a world-famous desert district situated in Nevada's Great Basin geomorphic province that contains the most complete, diverse, terrestrial (land-laid) fossil record of Miocene life yet discovered in North America--and perhaps the world, as a matter of fact--a genuinely spectacular paleontological place that produces from what earth scientists call the middle Miocene Esmeralda Formation an astounding association of well-preserved fossil material some 16 to 10 million years old, including: insects and arachnids (preserved in exquisite detail along the bedding planes of very thinly stratified sedimentary rocks commonly called "paper shales"); plants (leaves, seeds, flowering structures, conifer needles and foliage, diatoms--a microscopic single-celled photosynthesizing aquatic plant that constructed silica "shells"/frustules--pollens, and petrified woods); stromatolitic, cyanobacterial blue-green algal developments; mollusks (gastropods and pelecypods); ostracods (a bilvalve crustacean); mammals; birds; fish; amphibians; and turtles.

            Indeed, it's quite likely that no other place on the planet provides a better opportunity to study such a rich, essentially complete paleo-community of terrestrial Miocene plants and animals.

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            • Golden Bay New Zealand dinosaurs
              http://www.radionz.co.nz/news/nation...%27s-dinosaurs

              Time and tide - and a few massive earthquakes - have opened a portal into New Zealand's distant past.
              Scientists said the discovery this week of an ancient footprint in Golden Bay rock, is further proof that dinosaurs once walked, ate and swam in the area about 70 million years ago.
              They said the trace fossil - uncovered during a high school field trip - was a fantastic scientific discovery, and added to almost 50 others found in the last decade.
              lots of color pix at the link above

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              • record number of bones of 30,000 yr old Mammoths found at one location in Russia.


                link http://siberiantimes.com/science/cas...ibirsk-region/

                lots of news and photos at link above. these mammoths were very large, bigger than later mammoths.

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                • Sept. 1971 Saber Tooth tiger tooth and bones found in Nashville, Tenn. during building construction.

                  link: http://www.tennessean.com/story/news...rena/92829882/

                  in a buried cavern a huge tooth of a Saber tooth tiger found, along with human remains, teeth and human jawbone etc. back in late 1971. some photos etc.

                  The men in the room, including the construction site foreman, a geologist and two archeologists, stood in hushed amazement.
                  They were looking at the remains of an animal that carbon-dating would show lived more than 9,000 years ago.
                  http://www.gannett-cdn.com/-mm-/5f1c...6-710800-d.JPG

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                  • Abstract excerpt:
                    ...
                    Here we describe the feathered tail of a non-avialan theropod preserved in mid-Cretaceous (∼99 Ma) amber from Kachin State, Myanmar [ 17 ], with plumage structure that directly informs the evolutionary developmental pathway of feathers. This specimen provides an opportunity to document pristine feathers in direct association with a putative juvenile coelurosaur, preserving fine morphological details, including the spatial arrangement of follicles and feathers on the body, and micrometer-scale features of the plumage. Many feathers exhibit a short, slender rachis with alternating barbs and a uniform series of contiguous barbules, supporting the developmental hypothesis that barbs already possessed barbules when they fused to form the rachis [ 19 ]. Beneath the feathers, carbonized soft tissues offer a glimpse of preservational potential and history for the inclusion; abundant Fe2+ suggests that vestiges of primary hemoglobin and ferritin remain trapped within the tail. ...

                    Full Paper
                    This is an exceedingly significant find, and I hope more non-avian dinosaur stuff is found preserved that way.

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                    • Cretoxyrhina Mantelli 85 million year old shark tooth found by 11th grader at gully wash on her school grounds........http://www.wfaa.com/news/local/plano...ooth/422555500
                      at Plano (Texas) high school..

                      Space pope


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                      • For most of my life, I’ve believed that the dinosaurs fell into two major groups: the lizard-hipped saurischians, which included the meat-eating theropods likeTyrannosaurus and long-necked sauropodomorphs like Brontosaurus; and the bird-hipped ornithischians, which included horned species like Triceratops and armored ones like Stegosaurus.
                        ...

                        By thoroughly comparing 74 early dinosaurs and their relatives, Baron has radically redrawn the two major branches of the dinosaur family tree. Defying 130 years of accepted dogma, he splits the saurischians apart, leaving the sauropods in one branch, and placing the theropods with the ornthischians on the other
                        ...
                        Continued...
                        The link to the actual paper is already in the quoted excerpt, but just to reiterate, here it is again.

                        If it is true and ornithischia and saurischia is rendered obsolete, I am going to be so happy just because it's such a mess.

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