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  • Originally posted by blackcatnursery View Post
    Captain James Cook's ship Endeavour may have been found off US coast after a centuries-long search
    https://news.sky.com
    Australian archeologists believe they may have struck upon the precise location where the vessel was scuttled in 17

    Cool!!!!!!




    Comment


    • The girl says she was "throwing sticks and stones and stuff to see how far they skip" when she found "some kind of stick".

      Comment


      • Blackcatnursery, similar article in this thread back in 2016, post #217.

        03-05-2016, 10:46 PM


        Wreckage of Captain Cook's HMS Endeavour discovered

        Researchers believe they have found the wreckage of the HMS Endeavour, vessel of legendary British explorer, James Cook.
        Cook commanded the ship from 1768 to 1771 on his famous voyage mapping the uncharted waters of the south Pacific Ocean, but for years its whereabouts have remained a mystery.


        Link: http://edition.cnn.com/2016/05/02/li...reckage-found/
        http://themess.net/forum/science-and...y-thread/page6

        Comment


        • 'EVERY CHILD WHO KNOWS A FEW LETTERS OF HEBREW CAN READ IT'

          Earliest known stone carving of Hebrew word ‘Jerusalem’ found near city entrance

          While any inscription dating from the Second Temple period is of note, the 2,000-year-old three-line inscription on a waist-high column — reading “Hananiah son of Dodalos of Jerusalem” — is exceptional, as it is the first known stone carving of the word “Yerushalayim,” which is how the Israeli capital’s name is pronounced in Hebrew today.

          https://www.timesofisrael.com/earlie...city-entrance/

          Comment


          • Archaeologists detect 20-metre ship using motorised high-resolution ground-penetrating radar

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            • The 2,300-year-old winery concealed in a Spanish mountain

              The archeologist who discovered the Phoenician site in Cádiz wants to create an information center on the history and culture of wine

              https://elpais.com/elpais/2018/10/10...84_610152.html

              Comment


              • an amazing find -
                A Greek merchant ship dating back more than 2,400 years is found almost perfectly preserved.

                Comment


                • Archeologists are piecing together the dramatic last moments of two women and three children whose skeletons have been discovered at Pompeii.

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                  • London's Natural History Museum resorts to laser scanning to further sooth an old sore.

                    Comment



                    • Geologists Unearth Fully Intact Rock

                      This stunning find provides an illuminating glimpse into what rocks may have looked like in their complete form millions of years ago.
                      https://www.theonion.com/geologists-...ock-1819577658

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                      • Fantastic, a Fully Intact Rock!!!

                        I thought I would die before I could see one of these...

                        Now I can die in peace.

                        Comment


                        • Various Roman finds in the Netherlands recently:

                          ---------------

                          A bridge has been discovered in Utrecht (pretty much the center of the country). The bridge was constructed some time between 100 and 125AD near the northern most border of the Roman empire and is over 5 meters wide. Sixteen intact oak bridge pillars were found. The main building material for the bridge was basalt rock/stone from the area around Bonn (Germany) supported by a grid of four clusters of four pillars each. Along the southern bank of the Rhine the Romans had constructed a road and this bridge crossed one of the side branches of the river. Around twenty years ago a similar bridge was found in an area a few kilometers to the west.

                          Links have a picture of one of the pillars of the bridge and a schematic of the design respectively:

                          https://www.nu.nl/binnenland/5508605...n-utrecht.html
                          https://leidsche-rijn.nieuws.nl/2018...ekt-rijnvliet/

                          ----------------

                          A 125 meter stretch of road was found further to the west near the coast at Katwijk along with a Roman settlement finds including schematics of the layout (an archaeologists dream I can imagine), a moat and a cemetery. The road was most likely part of the same road as the bridge as both follow the border, river and both were constructed around 125AD.

                          https://www.romeinselimes.nl/beleef-...ing-in-katwijk

                          ----------------

                          The most spectacular find in my opinion:

                          A Roman guard tower near Krommenie (north west of modern day Amsterdam and north of the actual border which was the Rhine). This is important because it is the most northern evidence of prolonged Roman presence on the continent to date. Archaeologists have uncovered two of the four base corners of the tower. Around it was a small palisade. The enclosure was approximately half of one football field (soccer). This is considered extraordinary for a guard tower as most were smaller. The palisade wasn't square as was usual across the Roman empire, instead it had five sides. Underneath the palisade locally made (Frisian) pottery was discovered that may have been dumped during the construction or it may be older. The pottery was dated to the first half of the first century AD. Unfortunately it wasn't possible to dig up the entire site as a major power cable runs through the area that supplies half the population.

                          https://www.rtvzaanstreek.nl/vondst-...s/item?1104463
                          Last edited by Mike1976; 27-10-2018, 05:26 AM.

                          Comment


                          • Archaeologists find original French reinforced palisade wood fortifications built around Quebec City in 1693 to protect against the English.

                            [FONT="]"Josué Dubois Berthelot de Beaucours, a French military engineer, drew out the plans for the wooden fortifications built in 1693-94, designed to protect the colony from heavy artillery and cannon balls.
                            [FONT="]Decades later, under the growing threat of a British invasion, the French troops built the existing stone fortifications in 1745, a few dozen metres back from Beaucours' palisade."[/FONT]
                            [/FONT]


                            Pics and article here:

                            https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montr...ions-1.4893781
                            Last edited by Stonecutter; 07-11-2018, 04:23 PM.

                            Comment


                            • 1ST TIME THIS EXACT INSCRIPTION FOUND IN ANCIENT CAPITAL

                              Straight from the Bible: Tiny First Temple stone weight unearthed in Jerusalem

                              Volunteer at City of David sifting project finds rare ‘beka’ measure, used by pilgrims paying half-shekel tax before ascending to Temple Mount, in dirt from dig near Western Wall

                              https://www.timesofisrael.com/straig...-in-jerusalem/

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Stonecutter View Post
                                Archaeologists find original French reinforced palisade wood fortifications built around Quebec City in 1693 to protect against the English.

                                [FONT="]"Josué Dubois Berthelot de Beaucours, a French military engineer, drew out the plans for the wooden fortifications built in 1693-94, designed to protect the colony from heavy artillery and cannon balls.
                                [FONT="]Decades later, under the growing threat of a British invasion, the French troops built the existing stone fortifications in 1745, a few dozen metres back from Beaucours' palisade."[/FONT]
                                [/FONT]


                                Pics and article here:

                                https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montr...ions-1.4893781
                                good to see we 'helped' in the development of Quebec

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