Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Archeology thread

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by commanding View Post

    i know, I know, ask me teacher.
    Yes, yes, I Know you know.
    http://www.nbc.com/saturday-night-li.../3505914?snl=1

    Comment


    • Originally posted by riderboy View Post
      Funny I thought of Steve Martin too before I read your post

      Comment


      • Originally posted by commanding View Post

        there are several other human footprints or alleged human prints in the Americas. here:


        http://westerndigs.org/oldest-human-...ca-identified/ 10,500 yrs old

        http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/...ticle25069583/ who knows how old or if valid?

        and a bunch of very questionable tracks:
        http://www.talkorigins.org/faqs/paluxy.html
        There used to be some moccasin tracks in sandstone @ a bluff at Sapulpa, Oklahoma. I read about them in Indian Territory Pioneer Papers, or some other Oklahoma collection.

        Comment


        • Medieval Sword Recovered in Poland

          http://www.archaeology.org/news/5667...medieval-sword


          HRUBIESZÓW, POLAND—Science & Scholarship in Poland reports that a medieval sword was recovered from a peat bog in southeast Poland and donated to the Fr. Stanislaw Staszic Museum. The well-balanced weapon measures almost four feet long and is only missing the padding on its two-handed hilt, which was probably covered with wood, bone, or antler. An isosceles cross in a heraldic shield on the rear bar of the sword may have been the blacksmith’s maker’s mark. Conservators will look for additional marks on the blade.

          Comment


          • Not as cool as a sword but I found a nice point last week (not an "arrowhead" because it was actually used with an atlatl, which predates the use of bow and arrow technology). Too bad the tip is snapped off.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Stonecutter View Post
              Not as cool as a sword but I found a nice point last week (not an "arrowhead" because it was actually used with an atlatl, which predates the use of bow and arrow technology). Too bad the tip is snapped off.
              sweet find, the broken tip only shows it is authentic, and used. Any idea the source of the chert type?

              Comment


              • Cannons found off Israeli coast may have been used to fight 16th-century pirates

                Scientists research unique bronze weaponry from Megadim, made in Venice during the ‘Age of Sail’

                Three bronze cannons found off the coast of Megadim in northern Israel shed light on how the Venetian weapons industry innovated tools to help merchants fight off pirates hundreds of years ago.

                http://www.timesofisrael.com/cannons...9b7be-54773593

                Comment


                • He 'burned the house of the Lord, and the king's house; and all the houses of Jerusalem, even every great man's house, burned he with fire'

                  Finds in Jerusalem shore up biblical account of Babylonian conquest

                  On the eve of the Hebrew commemoration of the destruction of the Temples, archaeologists discover remnants of a blaze indicating the city was grander than thought

                  http://www.timesofisrael.com/new-jer...nian-conquest/

                  Comment


                  • Viking skeleton’s DNA test proves historians wrong

                    http://nypost.com/2017/09/08/viking-...torians-wrong/

                    By Natalie O'Neill

                    September 8, 2017 | 4:32pm | Updated

                    Viking skeleton’s DNA test proves historians wrong

                    The remains of a powerful viking — long thought to be a man — was in fact a real-life Xena Warrior Princess, a study released Friday reveals.

                    The lady war boss was buried in the mid-10th century along with deadly weapons and two horses, leading archaeologists and historians to assume she was a man, according to the findings, published in in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology.

                    Wrong.

                    “It’s actually a woman, somewhere over the age of 30 and fairly tall, too, measuring around [5’6″] tall ,” archaeologist Charlotte Hedenstierna-Jonson of Uppsala University, who conducted the study, told The Local.


                    And she was likely in charge.

                    Comment


                    • ^^ Very cool, Cowboy's Daughter

                      Originally posted by commanding View Post

                      sweet find, the broken tip only shows it is authentic, and used. Any idea the source of the chert type?
                      Sorry Commanding, didn't see this until now. No idea about the chert type, except that it is a chert as opposed to a chalcedony. Here in Alberta its usually brown "Montana" chert, grainy Etherington cherts from the Crowsnest Pass region, black pebble cherts, or silicified siltstone. Knife River Flint was traded in from north Dakota. The Blackfoot also knapped petrified wood, and quartzite cobbles were commonly used as well.

                      Comment


                      • The Grand Army Diet

                        https://www.archaeology.org/issues/2...-army-isotopes

                        In 2001, construction in Vilnius, Lithuania, revealed a mass grave of more than 1,000 soldiers and camp followers of Napoleon’s Grand Army who perished during the emperor’s disastrous 1812 retreat from Russia. Hundreds of thousands of men—and women—froze to death or succumbed to disease and starvation on the march.
                        Now the remains, recovered by a team of French and Lithuanian archaeologists, are the subject of a study, led by anthropologist Sammantha Holder of the University of Georgia, to determine the diets of those who died both before and during the events of 1812. Using stable isotope analysis, Holder and her colleagues have found diverse diets among the 78 individuals she analyzed. The soldiers in the Grand Army came from all over Europe and were stratified by status and rank, so Holder is not surprised that individual diets varied considerably.


                        Comment


                        • A surprisingly well preserved Viking fire burial field has been found in Loppi in central Finland. Among the recovered artefacts are at least a sword, an axe head and a clay urn filled with bone fragments.

                          In Swedish:
                          https://www.hbl.fi/artikel/nastan-10...unnet-i-loppi/

                          In Finnish:
                          https://yle.fi/uutiset/3-9851618

                          Comment


                          • blog

                            https://texanculturescollections.wor.../object_blogs/



                            Metal artifact with Spanish Coat of Arms found by TxDOT. Image by TxDOT.

                            https://texanculturescollections.wor...st-post-txdot/

                            A curious artifact was discovered among thousands of others at an archaeological site in East Texas. The historic artifact was found buried in a manner that suggests it held high value. It appears to be a metal box fragment consisting of two pieces from two different sides of a Spanish jewelry box. The metal is relatively heavy, made from either silver or pewter. The fragment features a mythological beast; either a griffin (front-half eagle, and back-half lion) or a wyvern (front-half dragon, and the back-half featuring a coiled tail like a seahorse). A coat of arms also appears on the artifact and is divided into four sections. Two adjacent sections feature a field of stars, and the other two depict a double headed eagle – a common symbol used in Western Europe by the Holy Roman Empire.

                            photo

                            https://texanculturescollections.fil...pg?w=479&h=319

                            Comment


                            • Scientists discover new hidden chamber in the Great Pyramid at Giza

                              http://www.ctvnews.ca/sci-tech/scien...amid-1.3660211

                              Comment


                              • Originally posted by Stonecutter View Post
                                Scientists discover new hidden chamber in the Great Pyramid at Giza

                                http://www.ctvnews.ca/sci-tech/scien...amid-1.3660211

                                Saw the news today....interesting. the ghost chamber........Boo!

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X