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  • Archeology thread

    I searched but did not find a thread about this science, so I'm starting this one.




    Roman boots leave 2,000-year impression

    Excavations in northern Israel yield rare imprints of hobnailed caligae worn by legionaries


    BY ILAN BEN ZION

    The hobnailed boot impressions were left in the still-wet mortar of the fortifications at Hippos, situated just east of the Sea of Galilee, according to an article published earlier this month in Popular Archaeology by Professor Michael Eisenberg.
    http://www.timesofisrael.com/roman-b...ar-impression/




    The more detailed original article on the site of Popular Archeology with its pictures:
    http://popular-archaeology.com/issue...-here-for-rome
    Last edited by Camera; 01-07-2015, 03:00 PM.

  • #2
    THE HOUSE REQUIRED SOME FIXING UP. 'WHILE THE WORKERS WERE BREAKING UP FLOORING, THE JACKHAMMER DISAPPEARED. IT JUST PLUNGED DOWNWARD.' THE REST IS, TRULY, HISTORY

    Jerusalem family finds 2,000-year-old ritual bath under living room

    Discovery in traditional hometown of John the Baptist points to presence of Jewish village during Second Temple era


    BY ILAN BEN ZION

    http://www.timesofisrael.com/jerusal...r-living-room/

    Comment


    • #3
      Ancient bobcat buried like a human being
      http://news.sciencemag.org/archaeolo...ed-human-being

      interesting in that the excavation was done in 1980 in a rush due to highway construction and the bobcat burial was classified at that time as a dog burial, a student examining the bones in a box later discovered it was a young bobcat bones, NOT a dog. the animal was buried with funeral objects, a necklace etc.

      Comment


      • #4
        Loved the Roman hobnailed boot print! Wow.

        Here's another recent archaeological discovery involving footprints, this time on the West Coast of Canada. These are over 13,000 years old and offer further evidence of a coastal migration route into the interior of North America at the end of the last ice age, as opposed to the "Ice Free Corridor", which opened up too late to have been used by the first settlers.

        http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/...ticle25069583/




        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Stonecutter View Post
          Loved the Roman hobnailed boot print! Wow.

          Here's another recent archaeological discovery involving footprints, this time on the West Coast of Canada. These are over 13,000 years old and offer further evidence of a coastal migration route into the interior of North America at the end of the last ice age, as opposed to the "Ice Free Corridor", which opened up too late to have been used by the first settlers.

          http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/...ticle25069583/



          there are several other human footprints or alleged human prints in the Americas. here:


          http://westerndigs.org/oldest-human-...ca-identified/ 10,500 yrs old

          http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/...ticle25069583/ who knows how old or if valid?

          and a bunch of very questionable tracks:
          http://www.talkorigins.org/faqs/paluxy.html

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by commanding View Post

            and a bunch of very questionable tracks:
            http://www.talkorigins.org/faqs/paluxy.html
            those have been shown to be dinosaur tracks since at least 1986. http://www.nytimes.com/1986/06/17/sc...nosaurian.html

            Comment


            • #7
              Unique find offers first opportunity to understand how the Roman military was organized in the eastern empire

              In first, imperial Roman legionary camp uncovered near Megiddo

              Archaeologists unearth remains of 2,000-year-old Galilee garrison of Sixth Legion Ferrata, where 5,000 men kept order at time of Bar Kochba Revolt — and the only permanent Roman military camp ever discovered in region


              BY ILAN BEN ZION

              The remains of an imperial Roman legionary camp — the only one of its kind ever to be excavated in Israel or in the entirety of the Eastern Empire from the second and third centuries CE — have come to light at a dig near Megiddo, archaeologists said this week.

              Legio, a Roman site situated next to Tel Megiddo in northern Israel, served as the headquarters of the Sixth Legion Ferrata — the Ironclad — in the years following the Jewish Revolt, and would have helped keep order in the Galilee during the Bar Kochba Revolt in 132-135 CE.

              CONTINUED:
              http://www.timesofisrael.com/in-firs...-near-megiddo/


              This is the first military camp of its kind to be discovered in the eastern part of the empire. The present understanding of Roman military architecture comes from discoveries in the western part (Germany, Britain, France…)

              Comment


              • #8
                Damnit, you beat me to it. I was waiting for some interesting news to start this thread myself

                This one is a bit older already (22nd June), but stil a great read.

                Archaeologists working in Bulgaria have confirmed that they uncovered the oldest prehistoric town in Europe. The town was likely home to some 400 people and dates back to between 4700 and 4200 BC – about 1,500 years before the emergence of the Greek civilization.
                more here http://www.zmescience.com/science/ar...aria-22062015/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Space pope View Post

                  those have been shown to be dinosaur tracks since at least 1986. http://www.nytimes.com/1986/06/17/sc...nosaurian.html
                  Spaceman,
                  You should have looked further down the page at all the varied links, the alleged hammer in stone, the infilling, mud collapse, the fossilized cowboy leg in modern boot, etc. The link is a mix of really stupid stuff mixed with a lot of hogwash, don't think anything is authentic....it was posted as a show of the amount of nutty stuff "out there".

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    This one is not exactly news about a discovery, but about a new research project that intrigues me. During my studies of prehistoric archaeology, I took several classes on Bronze Age subjects and I'm therefor quite excited about the issue. In my classes weapons and armor were only used as a way to date a grave, a settlement or fortification, but never to learn something about Bronze Age warfare, "military" (organizational) structure or social structure of their "armed forces". Having visitied (unfortunately not dug out) the remains several Bronze Age fortifications in Germany I always lamented the lack of proper/convincing interpretation. Discussions were more often than not cut short with the final "Uh, well, we don't know yet" argument.

                    Roman forts and medieval fortifications are well known, and some still shape Europe’s cultural landscapes today. However, during the Bronze Age, starting at the turn of the 17th to 16th century BCE, people were already constructing the first settlements fortified with strong walls to protect themselves against attackers and to control transit routes. Until now, little research has been performed on these Bronze-Age forts, even though they were a phenomenon that marked Central Europe for almost two millennia.

                    http://www.heritagedaily.com/2015/07...ars-ago/107614

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Scorned Shipwreck Identified as Baron De Rothschild's Missing Schooner

                      Now that it's finally been examined, a shipwreck found decades years ago off the Israeli coast turns out to be a long-lost ship that Baron Edmond James de Rothschild used to bring supplies from France to the Holy Land, suggest archaeologists from Haifa University. Lost from the record, the ship apparently sank very near its destination, the Israeli coast more than 100 years ago.
                      read more: http://www.haaretz.com/life/archaeology/1.670603
                      read more: http://www.haaretz.com/life/archaeology/1.670603

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Tomb Of Nefertiti, Egypt's Mysterious Ancient Queen, May Have Been Found.

                        Hidden doorways in the ancient Egyptian tomb of King Tutankhamun may lead to the long-lost resting place of Queen Nefertiti, a scientist has claimed. British archaeologist Dr Nicholas Reeves, based at the University of Arizona, made the claim after studying high-resolution scans of the walls of King Tutankhamun’s burial chamber in the Valley of the Kings, near Luxor.


                        article continues at the link.....

                        http://www.theguardian.com/world/201...logy?CMP=fb_gu

                        Dr Reeves academic report in full.....

                        http://www.academia.edu/14406398/The...efertiti_2015_

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Scientists find evidence of prehistoric massacre in Europe.

                          http://www.foxnews.com/science/2015/.../?intcmp=hpbt4

                          BERLIN — Scientists say they have found rare evidence of a prehistoric massacre in Europe after discovering a 7,000-year-old mass grave with skeletal remains from some of the continent's first farmers bearing terrible wounds.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JimHPTN View Post
                            Scientists find evidence of prehistoric massacre in Europe.

                            http://www.foxnews.com/science/2015/.../?intcmp=hpbt4

                            BERLIN — Scientists say they have found rare evidence of a prehistoric massacre in Europe after discovering a 7,000-year-old mass grave with skeletal remains from some of the continent's first farmers bearing terrible wounds.
                            Here's another article about it with some additional information


                            http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/eart...war-crime.html

                            I tried to find the original research publication at PNAS, but unfortunately it's behind a paywall. If anyone is interested (and too rich):
                            http://www.pnas.org/content/early/20...4-b6e4d0202431

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Syrian archaeologist beheaded by ISIS. This man was the world's foremost expert on the ruins of Palmyra.

                              edit: sorry, don't know how to post links here. I copy the url address of the article then post it in the "link" section, and nothing comes up. What am I doing wrong.

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