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The 'Great Dying': What made Earth's deadliest mass extinction so disastrous?

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  • The 'Great Dying': What made Earth's deadliest mass extinction so disastrous?

    http://www.foxnews.com/science/2018/...sastrous.htmle

    Around 252 million years ago, Earth’s most severe extinction incident wiped out all living things on the planet, but scientists have always wondered what made the event so severe.
    The Permian-Triassic extinction event, known as the Great Dying, killed 96 percent of all marine species and 73 percent of terrestrial vertebrate species.
    Research published on Monday in Nature Geoscience found that volcanic activity in the Siberian Traps in northern Russia was a primary driver of the event.

    Michael Bradley, a postdoctoral researcher at the Centre for Petrographic and Geochemical Research in France, presented detailed estimates of halogen abundance in Earth’s outer crust, known as the lithosphere, before and after the mass extinction.
    SCIENTISTS MAY HAVE UNCOVERED WHAT DINOSAUR DNA LOOKS LIKE
    “The eruption of halogens into the stratosphere catalyses ozone-destroying reactions, raising surface levels of biologically damaging UV radiation,” the authors wrote in the paper. This may have set off a chain reaction that “could potentially have liberated major amounts of halogens and other volatiles to the atmosphere, contributing to species decline and extinction during the end-Permian crisis.”
    These halogen-rich plumes are just one piece of the mysterious puzzle of factors that determined how bad the Great Dying ultimately was, but as humans work to better understand their impact on climate change now, it's worth looking back to the past
    Mordoror, muck

  • #2
    muck, reporting in. Wait, what?

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    • #3
      Domino or chain reaction effect...
      The same that may awaits us in a near futur
      Heating of the atmosphere -> freeing of GH effect gases trapped in the permafrost and marine clathrates -> more GH gases -> more heating etc ...
      This is what happened during the trias-jurassic extinction

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      • #4
        What is scary to me is the loss of food diversity and heirloom seeds /plants.

        IMHO, much of what people are fed as food is awful. Not nutritious, and is fattening.

        Banking on Seeds: Rare, Diverse, and Endangered

        http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/b...nd-endangered/

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Cowboy's daughter View Post
          What is scary to me is the loss of food diversity and heirloom seeds /plants.

          IMHO, much of what people are fed as food is awful. Not nutritious, and is fattening.

          Banking on Seeds: Rare, Diverse, and Endangered

          http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/b...nd-endangered/
          related : https://www.theguardian.com/environm...rops-nutrition

          Warming is impacting protein, vitamin and oligoelements content in several key crops (rice, wheat, barley ....)
          Impact can be huge given that some countries are barely self sustained in term of inputs
          Zinc, protein, vitamin deficit could kill (indirectly) a bunch of people through denutrition processes

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          • #6
            " killed 96 percent of all marine species and 73 percent of terrestrial vertebrate species."

            Surely we will never know with certainty what marine species or terrestrial vertebrate species existed back then?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Connaught Ranger View Post
              " killed 96 percent of all marine species and 73 percent of terrestrial vertebrate species."

              Surely we will never know with certainty what marine species or terrestrial vertebrate species existed back then?
              Through fossils analyses, we can have a good hint about what was present before and after
              error margin could be of few percentage points but not so much
              Wipping out 90 instead of 96% of all vertebrates still make the event a catastrophic one

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              • #8
                can I just throw this one in - Russian Volcanos to blame............

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                • #9
                  Interesting. Saw that also on Neil de Grasse Tyson´s cosmos documentary. And he did stress what Mordoro said. Beware of the tipping point where things get out of control.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mordoror View Post

                    related : https://www.theguardian.com/environm...rops-nutrition

                    Warming is impacting protein, vitamin and oligoelements content in several key crops (rice, wheat, barley ....)
                    Impact can be huge given that some countries are barely self sustained in term of inputs
                    Zinc, protein, vitamin deficit could kill (indirectly) a bunch of people through denutrition processes
                    Rather dire. Actually I dread the thought of Poland milking cows all year.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by primer View Post

                      Rather dire. Actually I dread the thought of Poland milking cows all year.
                      better than 'milking' the EU budget

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by blackcatnursery View Post
                        can I just throw this one in - Russian Volcanos to blame............
                        Seems like you have just acknowledged the undeniable fact that the state of Russia predates every other nation state on Earth by a couple of hundred million years and is therefore superior
                        Heck....before turning into Perfidious Albion, the British Isles were probably Russian colonies in the first place....maybe it's time to return culture and enlightment back to the isles and reincorporate them back into their historic motherland? :P

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by muck View Post
                          muck, reporting in. Wait, what?
                          Sorry - I assumed you’d be interested in a science topic of discussion.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Telmar View Post
                            Beware of the tipping point where things get out of control.
                            Despite the overall state of human health improving, our ultimate fate depends on the health of the planet. Dornbusch's Law is/will apply: Crises take longer to arrive than you can possibly imagine, but when they do come, they happen faster than you can possibly imagine.

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                            • #15
                              As interesting the climate change is I feel bad for the animal and plant diwersity being lost. Humans though, nah, we hawe waaay too many humans on this ball already. Besides, I am too pessimistic to think we will liwe through this, humans are just too short sighted and not ready to tackle the issue of ower population. One day humanity will die of hunger drowning on its own sh*t while fighting ower the last food and water reserwes.

                              (ps. my regular w button does not work, sorry)
                              Last edited by Lupus; 01-09-2018, 08:21 AM.

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