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  • #61
    I like to think the systems can tell the difference between a tumbleweed, a dog and a person crossing the road but maybe not every time? How would these cars react to tumbleweed stampedes?



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    • #62
      Originally posted by RobertKLR View Post
      I like to think the systems can tell the difference between a tumbleweed, a dog and a person crossing the road but maybe not every time? How would these cars react to tumbleweed stampedes?


      That would depend entirely on how the data from sensors would be interpreted, and what kind of sensors there are. If it’s FLIR, it’s not going to mistake it for a person. I’d have to go dig up some studies on automotive sensors and DSP chips in cars to give you a real answer.

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      • #63
        For the blind and physically disabled autonomous vehicles seem like an excellent idea ... to gain that level of freedom. Meanwhile robots like the ones in this video get spookier each day.

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        • #64
          I've just watched a lecture about big data, artificial intelligence and "industry 4.0" or "internet of things" as it's called in the US and i suddenly came to the realisation that we are probably doing it all wrong. I mean that sounds like i have the answer to a question that is not really there but everything we do in robotics and artificial intelligence is mimicking of human behaviour, because it's what we know, it can deliver results (compare the work of a robot to a human) and it integrates itself into existing concepts and workflows.
          But wouldn't the real revolution be there when AI were able to develop their own ways of thinking and doing things? I mean, we pack stuff in boxes, because they are handy for us. But that doesn't mean that "putting things in a box" is the grade A solution for everything. Maybe you could just pile stuff up and a logistics-robot will find it anyways. Are we able to progress if we want to keep control over AI all the time?
          I know that i don't pose a question here or anything but this just came to my mind and struck me and i wanted to write it down. And i'm not high or anything.

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          • #65
            We do it because evolution lead to it. Evolution is a master of developing superb solutions. For organisms. Albeit some physical feats transliterate to robotics aswell like movements of limbs.



            It is just engineering ad even there natural solutions are used because nature developed perfect solutions through try and error.

            Why re-invent the wheel?


            Robotic evolution would be needed. But how should that work?

            The robotic evolution process could for example be some kind of infinite simulation and taking the best result in the end.


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            • #66
              Originally posted by Hansinator View Post
              I've just watched a lecture about big data, artificial intelligence and "industry 4.0" or "internet of things" as it's called in the US and i suddenly came to the realisation that we are probably doing it all wrong. I mean that sounds like i have the answer to a question that is not really there but everything we do in robotics and artificial intelligence is mimicking of human behaviour, because it's what we know, it can deliver results (compare the work of a robot to a human) and it integrates itself into existing concepts and workflows.
              But wouldn't the real revolution be there when AI were able to develop their own ways of thinking and doing things? I mean, we pack stuff in boxes, because they are handy for us. But that doesn't mean that "putting things in a box" is the grade A solution for everything. Maybe you could just pile stuff up and a logistics-robot will find it anyways. Are we able to progress if we want to keep control over AI all the time?
              I know that i don't pose a question here or anything but this just came to my mind and struck me and i wanted to write it down. And i'm not high or anything.
              a) first of all, more robotics and automation in future means lesser tax income plus a redundant overpopulation..

              b) ..and if you ignore reglementations just to create a manmade evolution that acts independently or with unique ways to solve issues then be prepared to get a couple of oscars. a progress in areas you dont have access to / or advances out of your boundaries.. in an uncontrolled way is against the laws of ethics and reglementations,.. evolution of ai, robotics and automation should always be in sync with evolution of mankind, top priority.
              Last edited by heiliger_geist; 21-02-2018, 11:54 AM.

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              • #67
                at least you know its not going to spit on it - well you hope it doesn't
                Flippy, a burger-turning robot, has begun work at a restaurant in Pasadena, Los Angeles.

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                • #68
                  The $12K/yr operating costs doesn't sound right. That's probably the cost of a service contract for multiple machines.

                  A friend of mine works in Ft Worth at a Tyson corn dog plant as a tech. The automation is amazing and was just recently upgraded with newest robotics. It won't be long before the only people working there are robots and technicians.

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                  • #69
                    looks like it needs 5 pints of larger,,,,,,,,,,,
                    The automated cook is switched off while upgrades are prepared to help it work faster.

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                    • #70
                      Top 5 industrial robotics markets

                      The manufacturing of passenger cars has become increasingly complex over the past ten years: a substantial proportion of the production processes nowadays require automation solutions using robots. ....

                      ... Second tier automotive part suppliers, a large number of which are SMEs, are slower to automate fully but we can expect this to change as robots become smaller, more adaptable, easier to program, and less capital-intensive.
                      The more robotics we use, the more we will need.

                      https://www.therobotreport.com/top-5...ets-worldwide/

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                      • #71
                        Atlas does parkour. The control software uses the whole body including legs, arms and torso, to marshal the energy and strength for jumping over the log and leaping up the steps without breaking its pace. (Step height 40 cm.)

                        ... BostonDynamics

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                        • #72
                          Robotics Summit Boston Dynamics Presentation

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                          • #73
                            Many Germans open to Robots used as nursing staff. 41 % can imagine being cared for by robots at least parttime.

                            https://www.zeit.de/news/2018-10/23/...023-doc-1a85ff

                            Also found this page "Haushaltsroboter" (Household robotics) you can switch to the UK page on top right corner which I fin dintersting because of teh normalization of robots I see lots of lawnmower robots around since many years. I still earned money as a kid lawn mowing for neighbours

                            Maybe I buy winbot X the

                            https://www.haushalts-robotic.de/



                            My son got Vernie the Robot from Lego as christmas gift last year better begin soon learning robotics

                            https://www.lego.com/de-de/themes/bo...b074fd##sp=300


                            Germany is leading in robotics and automation it ranks number 3 with 322 robots per 10.000 employees. Only South Korea 710/10000 and Singapore 658/10000 use more.

                            Tightly followed by Japan, Sweden, Denmark and the US.

                            21404 idustrial robots were sold in 2017. IFR president Junji Tsuda constates that industrial robots play a key role. The robotivs sector ois lead by 5 actors China Japoan South Korea USA and Germany which make up for 73 % of all robots sold.

                            Astonishingly smaller European states like Slovakia 151/10000 Slovenia 144/10000 and the Czech Republic 119/10000 also boost high robotic automatisation numbers surpassinh thos e of larger indistrial countries.

                            Interestingly the EU is world wide leader in robotics with a total of 108/10000 robots.


                            Many more informations in this article which I found only in German

                            https://www.ingenieur.de/technik/fac...strierobotern/

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                            • #74
                              I think that China will se massive unrest amongst their lower and beginning middelclass, when they start to lay off people in favour of Robots.. Not everyone can be a Robotic specialist..

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                              • #75
                                Stuck between a rock and a hard place. Automated production outperforms manual labour by far.

                                I have seen stats that even in the higly educated and industrialised countries up to 1/4 of jobs will be lost.

                                But anyway, to not paint it all black, it will be akin to the dying of the heavy industries - we still have jobs - just different ones.

                                Countries with hundreds of millions of low skill jobs will face serious problems though, you are rtight with that.

                                The next decades will see exponential advances I presume.

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