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  • #31
    I blame japan. Goddamn weebs. I’m more a proponent of form following function. However there is something to be said for making it bipedal and roughly average human size if the goal is for it to interact in the same environment as humans and with humans day in and day out.

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    • #32
      This ^^^^
      Humanity has a tendency to anthropomorphism
      I guess most people would feel uncomfortable with insect like robots
      Plus our environment is made for us (bipedal) so if you want a robot that can act and interact in our own environment, the easiest way for it is to look like us from a general architecture pov.

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      • #33
        On the other hand, for the last 200 years or so, many humans have made a decent living doing jobs these robots will be doing, humans paying taxes, spending wages on buying homes, cars, sending kids to college, buying clothing, food, etc.
        And generally, since 1940 onward those jobs were not sweatshops but decent assembly jobs etc.
        Do not get me wrong, i know the automation is coming, progress cant be halted, but serious consideration must be given to the manner in which it will change society. All the facets.

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        • #34
          I would say it depends on the robots use.

          Otherwise, like always in engineering, form follows function. Even some maintenance aspects can change looks thoroughly - see podded engines on aircraft.


          Only servant robots will be human like in appearance and gesture. And I would say also to varying degrees depending on how intimate it will be with humans.


          How the robot looks, which builds my house is of tertiary interest to everyone.


          But Spartan may be right, the Japanase surely will build Hellokitty construction robots just for the heck of it...




          Collaboration robots increase productivity



          To keep production in Germany collaboration robots (cobots) are increasingly used. These are robots which can learn from the worker and support him.

          An example is, a production worker encounters a production situation that is oftenly repeated and time consuming.

          So he guides the robot through the necessary steps. He then performs on his own.


          http://www.all-electronics.de/kollab...rerproduktion/


          The cobots are from Robotiq or Universal Robots


          https://www.universal-robots.com/

          https://robotiq.com/de/
          Last edited by picanha; 22-12-2017, 05:56 AM.

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          • #35
            Amazon warehouse robots ... notice the embedded floor magnets for navigation. 22 second intro is not needed.



            Boston Dynamics Handle, world's first robotic 6 year old

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            • #36
              Asia's first fully automated port.

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              • #37
                I see that and I think lower port costs.

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                • #38
                  This hand could probably function without a body, eliminating the need for a human altogether. The end is near.

                  Researchers at the university say they have created an ultrasonic sensor which allows amputees to control individual fingers on a prosthetic hand, with enough sensitivity to play the piano, according to the report.
                  https://www.therobotreport.com/resea...digit-control/

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