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  • #31
    I blame japan. Goddamn weebs. I’m more a proponent of form following function. However there is something to be said for making it bipedal and roughly average human size if the goal is for it to interact in the same environment as humans and with humans day in and day out.

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    • #32
      This ^^^^
      Humanity has a tendency to anthropomorphism
      I guess most people would feel uncomfortable with insect like robots
      Plus our environment is made for us (bipedal) so if you want a robot that can act and interact in our own environment, the easiest way for it is to look like us from a general architecture pov.

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      • #33
        On the other hand, for the last 200 years or so, many humans have made a decent living doing jobs these robots will be doing, humans paying taxes, spending wages on buying homes, cars, sending kids to college, buying clothing, food, etc.
        And generally, since 1940 onward those jobs were not sweatshops but decent assembly jobs etc.
        Do not get me wrong, i know the automation is coming, progress cant be halted, but serious consideration must be given to the manner in which it will change society. All the facets.

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        • #34
          I would say it depends on the robots use.

          Otherwise, like always in engineering, form follows function. Even some maintenance aspects can change looks thoroughly - see podded engines on aircraft.


          Only servant robots will be human like in appearance and gesture. And I would say also to varying degrees depending on how intimate it will be with humans.


          How the robot looks, which builds my house is of tertiary interest to everyone.


          But Spartan may be right, the Japanase surely will build Hellokitty construction robots just for the heck of it...




          Collaboration robots increase productivity



          To keep production in Germany collaboration robots (cobots) are increasingly used. These are robots which can learn from the worker and support him.

          An example is, a production worker encounters a production situation that is oftenly repeated and time consuming.

          So he guides the robot through the necessary steps. He then performs on his own.


          http://www.all-electronics.de/kollab...rerproduktion/


          The cobots are from Robotiq or Universal Robots


          https://www.universal-robots.com/

          https://robotiq.com/de/
          Last edited by picanha; 22-12-2017, 05:56 AM.

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          • #35
            Amazon warehouse robots ... notice the embedded floor magnets for navigation. 22 second intro is not needed.



            Boston Dynamics Handle, world's first robotic 6 year old

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            • #36
              Asia's first fully automated port.

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              • #37
                I see that and I think lower port costs.

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                • #38
                  This hand could probably function without a body, eliminating the need for a human altogether. The end is near.

                  Researchers at the university say they have created an ultrasonic sensor which allows amputees to control individual fingers on a prosthetic hand, with enough sensitivity to play the piano, according to the report.
                  https://www.therobotreport.com/resea...digit-control/

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                  • #39
                    http://www.nortonrosefulbright.com/n...ge-data-breach

                    Apparently its dealt with thousands of enquiries costing about $8.30 per hour

                    "Global law firm Norton Rose Fulbright today announced the launch of “Parker”, the first Australian law firm chatbot to respond on privacy law, powered by artificial intelligence.

                    Created by two of the firm’s Australian technology lawyers, partner Nick Abrahams and associate Edward Odendaal, Parker was built to assist businesses respond to a major change in Australian law – the introduction of a mandatory data breach notification regime that comes into effect on 22 February 2018.

                    From that date, businesses that fail to notify their customers about an eligible data breach could be liable for civil penalty orders from the Privacy Commissioner of up to $2.1 million for organisations, and up to $420,000 for individuals."

                    Parker was built in-house by the firm using the IBM Watson AI platform, following discussions with LawPath, a NewLaw business and strategic alliance partner of Norton Rose Fulbright.

                    The chatbot allows users to find quick and informative answers to Australian privacy law questions, including whether a potential data breach incident will be subject to the new regime. You can chat to Parker on our website here.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by commanding View Post
                      On the other hand, for the last 200 years or so, many humans have made a decent living doing jobs these robots will be doing, humans paying taxes, spending wages on buying homes, cars, sending kids to college, buying clothing, food, etc.
                      And generally, since 1940 onward those jobs were not sweatshops but decent assembly jobs etc.
                      Do not get me wrong, i know the automation is coming, progress cant be halted, but serious consideration must be given to the manner in which it will change society. All the facets.
                      Driverless cars and trucks, if and when they arrive will be a real social issue. The amount of people involved in transportation is massive. Truck driving is the no.1 employment.

                      https://medium.com/basic-income/self...k-b8507d9c5961

                      There simply won't be the jobs available to sustain a emotionally and economically forfilled society.

                      The 55 yr old Joe trucker isn't going to learn programming and make that million dollar earning iPhone app.

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                      • #41
                        I've said this before but.... after 25 years of working in IT there is no way on gods green earth that I would ever trust a computer to drive me. They are just not reliable enough.

                        To add, Moore's law appears to have reached it's limits. Programmers won't be able to compensate for their sins by simply heaping more work onto hardware.

                        http://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/01...or_moores_law/

                        EDIT: In the past there has been an assumption that complicated and difficult programming just means 'throw more processor power at it' and this has been the assumption for Driverless vehicles - that even though it's one of the most complicated things ever to program for you can just wait until processing cycles become cheap and/or available enough and that'll solve it. To which I say say 'think again'.
                        Last edited by TheKiwi; 24-01-2018, 05:18 PM.

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                        • #42
                          Originally posted by TheKiwi View Post
                          I've said this before but.... after 25 years of working in IT there is no way on gods green earth that I would ever trust a computer to drive me. They are just not reliable enough.

                          To add, Moore's law appears to have reached it's limits. Programmers won't be able to compensate for their sins by simply heaping more work onto hardware.

                          http://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/01...or_moores_law/

                          EDIT: In the past there has been an assumption that complicated and difficult programming just means 'throw more processor power at it' and this has been the assumption for Driverless vehicles - that even though it's one of the most complicated things ever to program for you can just wait until processing cycles become cheap and/or available enough and that'll solve it. To which I say say 'think again'.
                          I have my doubts as well. I would have expected that automated driving would work reliably only if all cars were automated since the human factor would throw a wrench into any algorithmic way of automating vehicles.
                          On the other hand computer learning is a big thing these days and I can very well imagine that an auto pilot based on that could very well perform better than your average driver most of the time. In fact I could imagine getting a automated ride home from work might be more safe than driving tired, in bad weather and in poor visibility yourself. That said, I wouldn't want to be around anywhere near when a automatic car does something stupid which some will inevitably do, because the complexity of the problem is too complex to master and the technical solution will be inevitably full of unexpected surprises.

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                          • #43
                            I can maybe see sections of highways used in automated driving, but in a complicated metro... Just too much to go wrong.

                            Just wait for the first time a car swerves to miss a dog but takes out a bus full of kids.

                            I don't know how a computer could ever be trusted to solve the Trolly problem in microseconds.

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                            • #44
                              I do a lot of industrial automation and I have a saying about automatic safety devices, "They are called safety devices, not mercy devices".
                              Last edited by RobertKLR; 25-01-2018, 12:34 PM. Reason: spelking erwor

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                              • #45
                                Originally posted by Kilgor View Post
                                I can maybe see sections of highways used in automated driving, but in a complicated metro... Just too much to go wrong.

                                Just wait for the first time a car swerves to miss a dog but takes out a bus full of kids.

                                I don't know how a computer could ever be trusted to solve the Trolly problem in microseconds.
                                I think it’s very probable that in the future your car will have to have some form of automated system to get on the highway. This would make travel much, much more efficient. Side streets....maybe not for a few more decades.

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