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Top 10 technologies in precision agriculture

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  • Top 10 technologies in precision agriculture

    PrecisionAg's editor Eric Sfiligoj has prepared a list of the top 10 technologies that are shaping precision ag today. Most involve some level of robotics, navigation, sensors and variable rate dispensing.
    https://www.therobotreport.com/news/...on-agriculture


    Case IH displays new cab-less concept tractor

    Case IH (Case New Holland International Harvester) displayed their new cab-less tractor at a farming show in Iowa. The presentation was to show off what they hope will be the future: an autonomous tractor without a steering wheel, pedals or a cab for the driver.

    https://www.therobotreport.com/news/...oncept-tractor

  • #2
    Does the harvester have an auto-eject and dispose option for people it runs over?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by TheKiwi View Post
      Does the harvester have an auto-eject and dispose option for people it runs over?
      I've seen some autonomous farm vehicles in action and they will kill you if you get in their way. Ag AI is an uncaring asshole.
      There are no federal rules specifically addressing self-driving tech for tractors, largely because farm equipment is designed for use in fields where it doesn't pose the same level of risk to other vehicles or people as a self-driving vehicle on a public road. The closest thing to national regulations are safety standards set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, but the agency does not have any rules directly aimed at self-driving technology.

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      • #4
        The Case tractor is an interesting bit of gear. I'm just wondering if it's going to be able to cruise up next to a harvester and keep steady while it augers out into a chaser bin, or how it will deal with unexpected rocks, boggy areas etc when seeding and all the other things that a operator is handy for.

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        • #5
          From what I understand it can negotiate bad areas if the farmer has surveyed the area and told the machine what to expect and how he wants it deal with the problem areas. As for the detail chores I think it can learn so maybe once it learns how to do the job it may need no more help. There's plenty of videos and articles on the subject and I've been watching some of them off and on. If I find a definitive answer I'll post it.

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          • #6
            The low-tech precision alternative for killing weeds in hard to reach areas:
            http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-2...ontrol/7848078

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            • #7
              Got to worry about a bearded man who's passionate about goats...

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              • #8
                His cousin's a Kiwi sheep farmer.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by grendel View Post
                  The low-tech precision alternative for killing weeds in hard to reach areas:
                  http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-09-2...ontrol/7848078
                  There's several goat ropers in this area that rent out goats for lawn care. One man has 12 goats for the job. When he arrives he walks the herd around the perimeter then turns them loose and they will not go outside the area he walked them around. He'll leave them there for the day and when he comes back they will all be waiting in a group and jump in the trailer without any prompting.

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                  • #10
                    We used to have goats when I was growing up. They're good pets to have in the house - always have that strong funky smell and couldn't toilet train them though. It also has less fat and tastes better than lamb IMO.

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