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first photograph ever taken was almost lost to history

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  • first photograph ever taken was almost lost to history

    http://www.thisisinsider.com/first-p...history-2016-8

    This photo, simply titled, "View from the Window at Le Gras," is said to be the world's earliest surviving photograph. And it was almost lost forever. It was taken by Nicéphore Niépce in a commune in France called Saint-Loup-de-Varennes somewhere between 1826 and 1827. The process of taking a photo used to be much more complicated.
    I had seen the photo before, but did not know the process used which is explained in this brief/short article.

  • #2
    Nice find. I knew about the camera obscura part (during which it's amazing how old the process is), but not of the fact that lavender water was used to wash the image. Wonder what's so special about that component.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by IraGlacialis View Post
      Nice find. I knew about the camera obscura part (during which it's amazing how old the process is), but not of the fact that lavender water was used to wash the image. Wonder what's so special about that component.
      did you know the media was "bitumen of Judea" on a pewter plate? I had always thought it was silver on a copper plate or similar, to the daguerreotype.

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      • #4
        When I was about 12 I read that if you rubbed grass into a light colored fabric till it was good and stained then used a magnifying lens to focus an object on it you would get a permanent image. Well it took quite a few tries but I eventually managed to get the focused image of the backyard storage shed to show up on it. I could barely make out the door, door knob and siding but it was there (color was wrong but there was some color) and after a month the image actually improved but then faded by fall. The book I got that from mentioned something about the process being hundreds of years old and the author had made a picture of a woman on a bicycle that was taken directly on a tree leaf using the method. I guess it has something to do with the chemistry of chlorophyll. Apparently the process is not permanent.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by RobertKLR View Post
          When I was about 12 I read that if you rubbed grass into a light colored fabric till it was good and stained then used a magnifying lens to focus an object on it you would get a permanent image. Well it took quite a few tries but I eventually managed to get the focused image of the backyard storage shed to show up on it. I could barely make out the door, door knob and siding but it was there (color was wrong but there was some color) and after a month the image actually improved but then faded by fall. The book I got that from mentioned something about the process being hundreds of years old and the author had made a picture of a woman on a bicycle that was taken directly on a tree leaf using the method. I guess it has something to do with the chemistry of chlorophyll. Apparently the process is not permanent.
          that is a new one on me Robert, I love stuff like this. In photo lab we used to experiment, using photographic print paper, and use it rather than a negative in the big 4x5 speed graphic and it would make an image but it was not a good image, all we had to do was develop the photo paper like normal and fix it. it was negative obviously.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by commanding View Post

            that is a new one on me Robert, I love stuff like this. In photo lab we used to experiment, using photographic print paper, and use it rather than a negative in the big 4x5 speed graphic and it would make an image but it was not a good image, all we had to do was develop the photo paper like normal and fix it. it was negative obviously.
            I can't find the book but here's a link to the chlorophyll method of photography. It's almost the same thing as what the book describes but uses transparencies or negatives from photos to transfer pictures.

            http://www.alternativephotography.co...ophyll-process

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            • #7
              Originally posted by RobertKLR View Post

              I can't find the book but here's a link to the chlorophyll method of photography. It's almost the same thing as what the book describes but uses transparencies or negatives from photos to transfer pictures.

              http://www.alternativephotography.co...ophyll-process
              thank you very much, I think I am going to try that all I need is a piece of glass and I can rob one from a picture frame here. we got plenty of sun normally a bit cloudy today, will wait for sun again.

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