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The Romanian who is seeking asylum in Africa (among others.)

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  • The Romanian who is seeking asylum in Africa (among others.)

    Radu Mazare - Mazare, a former mayor of the Black Sea port of Constanta, was sentenced to six years and six months in jail for abuse of office.

    Elena Udrea, ex-minister and candidate in Romania’s last presidential election. Eager to rebuild her life thousands of kilometres away from home, Udrea fled to Costa Rica earlier this year.

    Sebastian Ghita, a former MP and businessman, has been fighting extradition from Serbia for a year and a half.


    http://www.euronews.com/2018/05/29/t...ylum-in-africa

  • #2
    Despite being on the Police watch list Mazare was able to flee the country.

    Urdrea was waiting sentencing on corruption charges supposedly went to Greece for a medical consultation about her pregnancy, then ended up in Costa Rica
    where she has been seen with another Romanian ex/pat on the run - Alina Bica, former chief prosecutor of the Directorate for Investigating Organized Crime and Terrorism (DIICOT), has also been in Costa Rica for several months.

    Birds of a feather flock together.

    Today it was reported on Urdrea FB account she has ideas on improving the Costa Rican sewerage system fancies her self being a minister for the environment. lol


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    • #3
      When I read the title I was thinking it was about a nut-job. I guess I was right!

      At least I found out something interesting reading the article:
      The World Justice project ranks Romania 29th out of 180 countries on the rule of law, sandwiched behind the Carribean nations of Barbados and St Kitts and Nevis and ahead of Italy and Greece. It is 59 places above Madagascar.
      ... I guess this is good?!

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      • #4
        Connaught Ranger, since you live there now, or at least you spend a large amount of time there (I'm just interested in your opinion as a foreign national)... is your personal impression that things have improved in the last 10 year? and would you qualify the change as major or marginal? What about in the last 2 years?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by BogT View Post
          Connaught Ranger, since you live there now, or at least you spend a large amount of time there (I'm just interested in your opinion as a foreign national)... is your personal impression that things have improved in the last 10 year? and would you qualify the change as major or marginal? What about in the last 2 years?

          Sadly, I have to say quite honestly the situation with corruption particularly in politics has not improved by any great measure.

          Having a political party in power whose main object is to implement new Laws and conditions that benefit those (particularly of its members and supporters) engaged in corruption, having a Minister for Justice whose main concern is implementing party directive to change the Law for the benefit of the corrupt, or finding people guilty of such and then giving them a suspended sentence or having them serve time under house arrest, allowing those under investigation to flee the country before or after conviction is joke.




          1. There can be no justification for political people to get Legal Amnesty's, suspended sentences, because they are Politicians,

          same for those who contribute to the political parties,

          why should they have such when its denied to the common people.




          2. Convicted Politicians need to be removed from the political arena, and not allowed to change parties, or be barred from politics for a set period, but a life ban!




          3.Political family hierarchy need to be broken, if elected at any level you can only serve 3 terms of office then your out ( some regional mayors have been in power 20+ because they either buy the votes or intimidate the locals.




          4. A serious investigation need to be launched into the waste of E.U. resources being stolen under the guise of restructure/improvement schemes (exp - Motorways costing 26 million euro per kilometer which are deteriorating less than a year after being declared open.




          5. There is basically no accountability for actions of corruption, court procedure is designed to drag on for years, even when a guilty verdict eventually arrives its immediately contested ensuring the (alleged) perpetrator freedom for years until the case is heard again.




          The situation as is has a knock on effect where many people dont see why they should follow the Law, when those at the top ignore it.




          Example - At this point in time Romania has the highest road death rate of any European country, some 3,000 per year due to an inability to follow the simple rules of the road, I reckon 80 percent of the drivers dont wear a seat-belt where I live, if not country wide and have seen police checkpoints waving drivers through while not wearing seat belts but stopping taxis and small vans for a mechanical check, and that they have the correct paper-work.




          Recently many Romanian drivers pull the belt over the seat behind their backs so the impression is given that the belt is being worn at first glance.

          Use of telephones for calls, texting, internet etc..etc. . major problem, recently a romanian bus driver was livestreaming himself when he drove into an oncoming truck killing himself and 8 others and orphaning 17 children.




          Also the concept of chubook / baksheesh is still in use particularly when looking for medical care, or bribing teachers to get good exam results for students.




          Its sad really, I love living in Transylvania/Romania in general, but its let down by the fact that most people regardless of the ethnic persuasion just flatley refuse to follow basic regulation in general.




          I was told, "hey mister Communisum is gone, we can do as we like now with Democracy," to which I reply, "Wrong, there are rules in Democracy too, what you do is best described as Anarchy.

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          • #6
            Sadly, I fully agree with you!

            On average, the young, educated (including technical skills), working people seek an improvement to the running of the state. While not perfect, these were the people that pushed for normality and, for a moment, Romania showed promise. These days, they are probably packing...

            There is a group of politicians that try to revert everything back to the days when they did not have to justify themselves to anyone. First, they changed the electoral laws to effectively discourage voting and ensure they can gain key position without a majority (mayors and parliament majority obtained with less than 20% of total options; the electoral law makes it impossible to vote if you travel; if you work and live in the EU, your vote for the parliament is worth about 1/10 of someone who is the country). Than they used the parliament majority to push for a change in the laws of the justice system.

            The problem is that there is a substantial amount of people that support these politicians. These are the same that think the laws should only apply to other people. And for them to get away with the small stuff, they are OK to let politicians to get away with the big things.

            And yes, the "seat-belt mentality" is a dead giveaway (I have noticed this as well, with some people even trying to convince me not to use it decades back!), and more recently "texting while driving" (fast, on one-lane county roads). Funny enough, some of these people respect the same rules in the west that they ignore at home (shows their mentality).


            Foreign people and friends tell me they like Romania. While I can agree with them when it comes to nature, some cities, local food and wine, and even some people, I find more and more Romania, as a country construct, to be toxic. We are celebrating 100 years from the union of Transylvania with the kingdom of Romania (so modern Romanian) and I realize that most of the time the state did not work in a normal way (and I would be OK with its dissolution inside the EU, as long as the Romanian people can be protected -- this realization makes me sad, as I think I'm giving up on this country).

            Oh well, the EU will get an influx of the best and brightest... US/NATO gets a place for a military base... but I don't see any contributions natively made in that country (to science and philosophy, or to art) to ever matter.


            P.S. I just saw Oscar Wilde's "An Ideal Husband" for the first time. Basically, and spoilers for this 100 years old play , the corruption acts done by the protagonist in his youth should be forgotten (because we, the audience, are supposed to like him? no other reason is actually given) and we should even accept (or even support) his reward to a cabinet position, rather than just a quite exit from the politic scene, for managing to avoid a public scandal regarding this past. This effective amnesty for corruption hit home really bad, and I left the theater disgusted.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Connaught Ranger View Post
              Radu Mazare - Mazare, a former mayor of the Black Sea port of Constanta, was http://www.mediafax.ro/social/radu-mazare-condamnat-la-sase-ani-si-sase-luni-de-inchisoare-reactia-fostului-edil-aflat-in-madagascar-dupa-aflarea-sentintei-17218408"]sentenced to six years and six months in jail[/URL] for abuse of office.

              Elena Udrea, ex-minister and candidate in Romania’s last presidential election. Eager to rebuild her life thousands of kilometres away from home, Udrea fled to Costa Rica earlier this year.

              Sebastian Ghita, a former MP and businessman, has been fighting extradition from Serbia for a year and a half.


              http://www.euronews.com/2018/05/29/t...ylum-in-africa
              So what African country did you mean?

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Musashi View Post

                So what African country did you mean?
                Radu Mazare fled to Madagascar.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by BogT View Post

                  Radu Mazare fled to Madagascar.
                  Sounds very desperate.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Musashi View Post
                    Sounds very desperate.
                    Depends on size of "swiss bank account".

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Asheren View Post

                      Depends on size of "swiss bank account".

                      One estimate is 114 Million Euro.

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