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What are the consequences to the US if Mexico implodes?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by ren0312 View Post
    What are the consequences to the US if Mexico implodes
    If you've been following the news with regards to Syria and Europe I don't have to explain any further what my guess on this matter is.

    The US reaction may be different, but I don't think that the initial ideas of the average Mexican will be any different: Cross the border into the US and apply for asylum. With Mexico having imploded they would have a better chance to be living there (semi-)permanently than they do now.

    I'm not entirely sure on this and it likely varies with each product category, but even if Trump imposed higher import taxes on goods produced in Mexico most I reckon would still be cheaper than if they were made in the US. Lower wages, less social security, less human rights concerns, less environmental obstructions.

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    • #17
      This was posted on Jan. 4.

      As Mexico’s Gas Prices Surge, Drug Cartels Threaten Violence



      http://www.nacsonline.com/YourBusine...x#.WHGnWH3NuUk

      Protestors have blocked service stations, commercial transportation, and roads demanding lower pump prices. Then things took a violent turn when the Jalisco New Generation cartel issued threats to burn gasoline stations because of the price increases.
      Gas-price protesters block trains at Ariz.-Mexico border

      http://www.elpasotimes.com/story/new...rder/96279746/
      In Nogales and along the U.S.-Mexico border, which has different pricing than the rest of the country, the price spiked to 16 pesos per liter from 11 pesos, a 47% increase.
      That comes out to roughly $2.78 per gallon. Just across the border, in Nogales, Ariz., a gallon of fuel costs about $2.15.
      and By blocking the railroad tracks, the protests affected production at a Ford Motor Co. assembly plant in Hermosillo, the state capital, said Hipolito Sedano, the Sonora border region president of the National Chamber of the Transformation Industry. The plant employs about 5,000 workers and generates another 10,000 jobs in the area, he said.
      On Wednesday, protesters in Nogales also blocked the northbound vehicle lanes for several hours heading into Nogales, Ariz., at the Dennis DeConcini Port of Entry, the main border crossing in downtown Nogales.
      Last edited by Cowboy's daughter; 07-01-2017, 06:56 PM. Reason: added article..

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      • #18
        Implodes is a really idiotic term - although not one I am surprised to see. Mexico has been through depressions and banking woes and oil price crashes and many other problems before without "imploding".

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Hanse View Post

          Hopefully it would make it easier to build the wall. Maybe add a minefield to it as well. And I wouldn't just tax outward remittances, I confiscate them entirely. Why should illegal aliens be allowed to wire home money acquired illegally? If I deposited $100k in my bank account, not only would the IRS crawl up my ass with a microscope, if they discovered I acquired it by selling cocaine they'd take the money and throw me in jail. Why should illegal aliens get a pass?
          Why should the business that knowingly employ illegal labor get a pass? Seize their assets, shut them down, and prosecute their leadership. If you want a heavy handed approach then make sure it applies to all who contribute towards the illegal immigration problem.

          Soon as companies like Conagra, Tyson, Smithfield and all the rest feel the pain we will see positive change.

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          • #20
            I think it's time for a What if? / Question of the day from ren0312 - Megathread

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Devil Child View Post

              Why should the business that knowingly employ illegal labor get a pass?
              Where did I say they should? I wouldn't shut down the businesses though, I'd just go after their leadership and boards of directors. Don't let them pass the buck and play stupid either.

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              • #22
                Hey breki how bout title it What if? ren0312's questions that don't matter.

                We also need a graph megathread

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Hanse View Post

                  Where did I say they should? I wouldn't shut down the businesses though, I'd just go after their leadership and boards of directors. Don't let them pass the buck and play stupid either.
                  Agree for the most part. Hopefully a few business, aggressively targeted would send a message to reform or else.

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                  • #24
                    What if Mexico gets full of graphs and climb over TRUMPs wall and cuckold everyone---to kill them or nickleback them to Alberta? Discuss.

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                    • #25
                      Interesting to see that the current trouble in Mexico, which is caused by hikes in oil prices, is the direct result of implementation of GREATER market liberalization. You know, the stuff that evil Marxists should do more of

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by commanding View Post
                        What if Mexico gets full of graphs and climb over TRUMPs wall and cuckold everyone---to kill them or nickleback them to Alberta? Discuss.
                        I think that is a question for Devil Child

                        Lol

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Protest in Ixmiquilpan, Hidalgo. Photo

                          http://www.jornada.unam.mx/ultimas/2...infundir-miedo

                          google translate:
                          They detect 485 false accounts that issued 'tuits' to infuse fear

                          Mexico City. "You know that when you work in government, the information arrives," says a woman's voice in a WhatsApp message. He adds: "We have strong rumors ... of an impending coup. Please do not go out late, do not leave your homes, these days the thing is going to get very ugly. " Warnings like this and others about alleged looting related to the rise in the price of gasoline circulated on Wednesday in social networks and chat groups. Some were reportedly part of a coordinated operation. The group of Internet analysts and social networking behavior called LoQueSigue identified that since 485 fake Twitter accounts were sent 1,550 messages with the #SaqueaUnWalmart tag.

                          The group published the list, which can be consulted at the address: pastebin.com/yweFk6Ek. If one of the names of the accounts in the list is taken at random, that of the message 891, for example, and you enter your profile in The social network, it is noted that on Wednesday that account was used to replicate dozens of messages with the mentioned hashtag, which were issued from other fake accounts.

                          Read the full note here.
                          Most read

                          People are angry and the political class does not want to see the social outburst: Solalinde
                          Protests against gasoline in at least 25 entities
                          Unsustainable, the argument to increase gasolines, indicate opposition deputies
                          The student sector joins protests over rising fuel prices
                          What would we have done?
                          Road closures in nine states
                          The awakening
                          73 detainees and 22 injured police eviction from Pemex central in Rosarito
                          Under Scrutiny
                          The world in the Trump era: what can we expect?

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                          • #28
                            One article from above: "The Awakening":
                            Google Translate
                            The awakening

                            Heading to collapse: nine failed presidents
                            José Agustín Ortiz Pinchetti
                            N

                            We ask you when and why Mexico was fxxxxx? It was not suddenly, we did not collapse like a gentleman who collapses in the street for a heart attack. It's a long process of 50 years until we get where we are. Three generations. Nine failed governments, from Gustavo Díaz Ordaz to Enrique Peña Nieto.

                            Let's review the parade: Gustavo Díaz Ordaz, Luis Echeverría Álvarez, José López Portillo, Miguel de la Madrid Hurtado, Carlos Salinas de Gortari, Ernesto Zedillo Ponce de León, Vicente Fox Quesada, Felipe Calderón Hinojosa and Enrique Peña Nieto. All made serious mistakes and none of them corrected: savage repression, irresponsibility in the handling of public money, the bet on a single deck: oil. The electoral frauds decided in Los Pinos, fateful weakness in the negotiation with the United States, tolerance with corruption, an integration with North America that turned to Mexico a protectorate. The delivery of the credit system to foreigners, the protection of white collar criminals, the folly of a war against drug trafficking that has bloody the country, structural reforms that end in shipwreck, etcetera.

                            In addition, all of them lacked the courage to decide for a more progressive alternative. And the accumulation of pimps is what has led Mexico (or at least the political regime) to a deterioration that today seems fateful. It is easy to associate this long succession of leaders, mistaken for half a century, with the ideas of Barbara Tuchman (The March of Madness). We found that, although most of the presidents were very intelligent, experienced and had a centralized and powerful state, they were crumbling the apparatus with serious decisions.

                            They all fulfilled Tuchman's requirements to regard them as foolish: their decisions were self-destructive; There were other viable options that they disdained and finally, although each of them was legally responsible, in all cases, they were supported by their teams and by the oligarchy. We do not know of a strong conflict. The presidents imposed their will and their mistakes.

                            Twitter: @ortizpinchetti

                            Mail: joseaorpin@gmail.com

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Holy Moly!

                              Read this one in Google Translate!

                              http://www.jornada.unam.mx/2017/01/08/politica/004n1pol

                              The US government closes the garrison of San Isidro after the disturbances by the petrolzo

                              Photo
                              One of the moments when demonstrators and federal police clashed yesterday before the access to the Pemex plant in Rosarito, Baja CaliforniaPhoto Alfonso Margarito Martinez

                              (I've been to Rosarito--it is not far to the border.)

                              @ the border--Tijuana!

                              Tijuana, BC.

                              Led by the Federal Police (PF), hundreds of state and municipal agents, accompanied by dogs, an anti-riot unit and helicopters, evicted about 300 demonstrators who since January 2 blocked access to the plant that Petróleos Mexicanos has in The conurbado municipality of Rosarito, to 30 kilometers of this city.

                              Official sources reported that the total of the eviction was 73 arrests, 15 civilians injured, including several journalists, as well as seven federal police with injuries, one of whom has cranial contusions, because a citizen took a pickup truck with logos Of a local company and launched it against the police contingent.

                              The clashes began at 4 am yesterday, when PF and Gendarmerie officers arrived at the plant and asked demonstrators to withdraw to allow the gas supply pipes to leave for the Tijuana stations, which For two days they are without fuel.

                              There the first struggle began. The police threw tear gas at them and protesters responded with stones. Later there were other frictions, reason why 100 municipal police of Tijuana arrived of support. The Pegasus helicopter of the state preventive police flew overhead.

                              Pedro Hernández, coordinator of the PF, then warned residents to withdraw within five minutes. After this time, the grenadiers advanced against the demonstrators and threw rubber bullets. Those who refused to disperse eventually gave way and the area was cleared.

                              Less than an hour later they regrouped and at night they continued to express their disagreement between acts of violence.

                              Several reporters were assaulted by the police, including Laura Sánchez Ley, correspondent for El Universal; Jorge Lebrija, of Telemundo; Luis Alonso Pérez, collaborator of Political Animal; Jesús Bustamante, photographer of the local newspaper Frontera, and Joel Lozano, collaborator of Diario Tijuana, among others. Some were damaged cell phones and shattered photographic equipment.

                              Meanwhile, some 1,000 people gathered at the monument to Cuauhtémoc - the golden zone of Tijuana - to express their rejection of the increase in gasoline, as well as the rise in water and property taxes in the state.

                              Then they marched to the El Chaparral customs. With the shout of "Outside Peña!", The contingent arrived at the garita, raised all the feathers and gave free passage to the motorists who entered Mexico from California, who sounded the horn in support sample.

                              After the unrest, the US government closed the San Isidro checkpoint, the busiest on the border, where hundreds of Mexicans cross into that country. The passage through Otay's gates was still open, but it became saturated.

                              At the close of this edition, a PF plane landed at Tijuana airport, according to an unofficial source with up to 300 reinforcement agents.

                              ...more on the link...

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by commanding View Post
                                What if Mexico gets full of graphs and climb over TRUMPs wall and cuckold everyone---to kill them or nickleback them to Alberta? Discuss.
                                As long as they keep Enemy Crab its all good.

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