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  • Some of this just seems like silliness for silliness sake. If the UK remains in the customs union animal foods don't have to be checked, if it doesn't they do, despite having agreed all the same regulations. Are animal foods going to suddenly mutate as a result of leaving the customs union? Does anyone even understand what this is about? And is it just animal foods from NI to UK or vice-versa too?

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    • i think it has something to do with teh EU not monitoring anymore how stuff gets into the UK. I'm no animal foods expert but I presume that soy and corn play a large role in it.

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      • Originally posted by JMach View Post
        Some of this just seems like silliness for silliness sake. If the UK remains in the customs union animal foods don't have to be checked, if it doesn't they do, despite having agreed all the same regulations. Are animal foods going to suddenly mutate as a result of leaving the customs union? Does anyone even understand what this is about? And is it just animal foods from NI to UK or vice-versa too?
        That kind of crap was solved by a common market a few years ago, as well as the implementaion of common norms and verification procedures. All the stuff some Brits found overwhelmingly abhorrent.
        Last edited by Telmar; 11-10-2018, 02:19 AM.

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        • Originally posted by Telmar View Post

          That kind of crap was solved by a common market a few years ago, as well as the implementaion of common norms and verification procedures. All the stuff some Brits found overwhelmingly abhorrent.
          But part of the proposed Chequers deal was to adhere to the regulations of the single market on goods. So this is a non-issue being raised just for the sake of controversy.

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          • But the Chequers deal is rejected by Brexithardliners. And a customs union does´nt always include issues of health and food safety. For that the UK needs to declare following the set of rules in the EU....AND probably to be audited regularly. These things along with immigration have been the bones of the Brexit dogs on lamenting themselves on lost sovereignity.

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            • Originally posted by Telmar View Post
              But the Chequers deal is rejected by Brexithardliners. And a customs union does´nt always include issues of health and food safety. For that the UK needs to declare following the set of rules in the EU....AND probably to be audited regularly. These things along with immigration have been the bones of the Brexit dogs on lamenting themselves on lost sovereignity.
              Brexithardliners are irrelevant unless the EU accepts the deal. The Chequers deal agreed to follow single market health and safety regulations and indeed all technical standards pertaining to goods. But the EU is saying that 10 times as many checks would still need to be done on animal foods. Why? The EU does not want a deal and right now people are merely attending negotiations for presentation purposes and wasting time that could be better spent planning for no deal if the EU is too unpragmatic to realise that there are far more EU jobs at stake on goods than UK jobs.

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              • For the moment, the Chequers plan is a white paper...and it has flaws: mainly that the promises from the UK side cannot be guaranteed.

                The EU has proposed two types of partnership: Norway type and Canada type. The first involves freedom of movement for people which the UK rejects, the other is that of a treaty with its own limitations. The Canada one is what is closest to the type of Brexit many in the UK want, but that´s no common market.


                It does´nt get more pragmatic than that. Not only does the UK have a choice, it chooses between two systems that already function instead of some technocratic mumbo-jumbo made up to look like you´re leaving the EU with a finger up, but not shooting your economy down by leaving the common market that gave you so much.

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                • BECAUSE .......................................

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                  • I think that sums up Brexit quite elaborately

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                    • Originally posted by Telmar View Post
                      For the moment, the Chequers plan is a white paper...and it has flaws: mainly that the promises from the UK side cannot be guaranteed.

                      The EU has proposed two types of partnership: Norway type and Canada type. The first involves freedom of movement for people which the UK rejects, the other is that of a treaty with its own limitations. The Canada one is what is closest to the type of Brexit many in the UK want, but that´s no common market.


                      It does´nt get more pragmatic than that. Not only does the UK have a choice, it chooses between two systems that already function instead of some technocratic mumbo-jumbo made up to look like you´re leaving the EU with a finger up, but not shooting your economy down by leaving the common market that gave you so much.
                      Well either there's trust or there isn't. That's why the hardliners want a no deal because the EU refuses to see that the Chequers plan is actually a huge compromise in their favour, just because it doesn't fit in a given predefined pigeon hole. Only for business lobbies built around the status quo, the Chequers plan wouldn't even be supported. The Canada deal is pointless given the level of EU NTBs and since any deal would mean paying the divorce bill, a better option would be WTO tariff collection and no divorce bill and leave it to the EU to force the Republic of Ireland to build a wall and pay for the wall, if they deem it necessary in their infinite wisdom.

                      I also contest that the common market gave us so much. It was the same for everyone and yet we paid the 2nd highest net fee for it, despite only being the 5th largest exporter.

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                      • Originally posted by JMach View Post
                        Well either there's trust or there isn't. That's why the hardliners want a no deal because the EU refuses to see that the Chequers plan is actually a huge compromise in their favour, just because it doesn't fit in a given predefined pigeon hole. Only for business lobbies built around the status quo, the Chequers plan wouldn't even be supported. The Canada deal is pointless given the level of EU NTBs and since any deal would mean paying the divorce bill, a better option would be WTO tariff collection and no divorce bill and leave it to the EU to force the Republic of Ireland to build a wall and pay for the wall, if they deem it necessary in their infinite wisdom.

                        I also contest that the common market gave us so much. It was the same for everyone and yet we paid the 2nd highest net fee for it, despite only being the 5th largest exporter.

                        It would not be as according to in compilance with WTO rules tarifs on imports to EU would make most of it unprofitable in same time said tarifs protected your companies in one of largest common market on the planet from external competition.

                        Originally posted by JMach View Post
                        Some of this just seems like silliness for silliness sake. If the UK remains in the customs union animal foods don't have to be checked, if it doesn't they do, despite having agreed all the same regulations. Are animal foods going to suddenly mutate as a result of leaving the customs union? Does anyone even understand what this is about? And is it just animal foods from NI to UK or vice-versa too?
                        No but give it a week and someone will try to exploit lack of those checks.
                        Last edited by Asheren; 11-10-2018, 08:31 AM.

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                        • Originally posted by Asheren View Post
                          It would not be as according to in compilance with WTO rules tarifs on imports to EU would make most of it unprofitable in same time said tarifs protected your companies in one of largest common market on the planet from external competition.
                          It would make a lot more products coming from the EU to the UK unprofitable, so on net, the gain would be on the UK side, plus getting to keep the divorce bill money and the interest on it as a bonus.

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                          • Originally posted by JMach View Post
                            It would make a lot more products coming from the EU to the UK unprofitable, so on net, the gain would be on the UK side, plus getting to keep the divorce bill money and the interest on it as a bonus.

                            Nope you don't seem familiar how EU tarifs system is functioning. Second thing is as yourself how much of those products comming to UK is actualy used to manufacture goods sold back to EU.

                            We are not even actualy agruing about the important part. 80% of UK economy is comming serivces not actual goods. Here no deal brexit can litteraly mean having acess cut off overnight practicaly in even of no deal.

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                            • Originally posted by Asheren View Post
                              Nope you don't seem familiar how EU tarifs system is functioning. Second thing is as yourself how much of those products comming to UK is actualy used to manufacture goods sold back to EU.
                              I'm fully aware of how tariffs work and the ratios. I'm also aware that we don't have to impose maximum tariffs on everything. For instance, if we wished,we could import EU components, like say car parts, minus tariff and at the same time impose maximum tariffs on vehicle imports. Or we could source those same components from say the US, or domestically, and still impose maximum tariffs on EU vehicles and car parts. People are massively naive if they think the EU won't be affected and there is no saved money to counter the affect for the EU. This is why Chequers is extremely generous and many Brexit hardliners are against it.

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                              • Originally posted by JMach View Post
                                I'm fully aware of how tariffs work and the ratios. I'm also aware that we don't have to impose maximum tariffs on everything. For instance, if we wished,we could import EU components, like say car parts, minus tariff and at the same time impose maximum tariffs on vehicle imports. Or we could source those same components from say the US, or domestically, and still impose maximum tariffs on EU vehicles and car parts. People are massively naive if they think the EU won't be affected and there is no saved money to counter the affect for the EU. This is why Chequers is extremely generous and many Brexit hardliners are against it.
                                There is simply forcing companies to close assembly plants in UK etc.

                                Actualy our company has givent UK goverment pretty much a deadline till 6 months before end of transit preiod if certain issues related to medication import/export,certificates etc. are not sorted, my department, sales and some skeleeton crew HR,accounting is all that is going to be left. There are litteraly thousands of companies that are preparing to do same thing. Simply UK is too small market comparing to EU and having to redo all hops for one country is cheaper than for 26.

                                Second issue i am not sure you are aware off is that some services for example certain financial ones are not allowed in EU for companies that do no reside in EU.

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