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A revolutionary show we’ll talk about forever

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  • A revolutionary show we’ll talk about forever

    I was watching this show that was aired late at night (because violence) back in the late 90s/early 00s. Only great memories from it nevermind the kickass intro. Perhaps The Wire and Breaking Bad have been slightly better since this era. YMMV.



    http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/201...-about-forever

    Twenty years on from when it was first aired, Jennifer Keishin Armstrong looks back at a drama so perfectly timed, it reinvented not only the genre, but how we watch TV.

    David Chase wanted to be an avant-garde European film-maker, the next Fellini, or at least a 1970s US auteur, the next Scorsese. Instead, throughout the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, he found himself toiling in the episodic television mines at shows such as The Rockford Files and Northern Exposure. He loathed the medium, but he couldn’t seem to make the jump to feature film-making.

    When he had the idea for The Sopranos script – mob boss goes into therapy to deal with his overbearing mother – he wanted it to be a movie. The plot would revolve around a suburban New Jersey gangster, Tony Soprano, and the complicated interaction between his professional life and family life as a son, husband and father. It would be a sometimes sensitive, sometimes brutal, very modern take on mob films such as Goodfellas and The Godfather.

    ...

  • #2
    The best scene of the series:

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    • #3
      Never saw it. I just don't get the fascination with gangsters/mafia/etc.... Maybe that show is deeper than the gangster basis?

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      • #4
        Euroamerican it definitely is. It's really more about family relationships against the backdrop of people who just happen to be Mafia.


        I read a great book called The Revolution was Televised: The Cops, Crooks, Slingers, and Slayers Who Changed TV Drama Forever by Allan Sepinwall. Each chapter or section provides an oral history of a different television show that, in the author's opinion, became classics that changed how stories are told on TV. I mention it because there's a chapter on The Sopranos, obviously, but the other chapters include shows like The Wire, Deadwood, Buffy, and Battlestar Galactica, and it's just a great read.

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        • #5
          Well said EM..

          Euroamerican; The sopranos were so much more than that. It’s not only about Scorcese like stabbings, burying in the forest and all.

          Breaking bad wasn’t different, violence is omnipresent but the relationships inside their family/cartel/mob make those shows fascinating.

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          • #6
            The Sopranos was good entertainment, no doubt.

            The last episode, however, was a terrible disservice to what was otherwise a well written show.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Jake View Post
              Well said EM..

              Euroamerican; The sopranos were so much more than that. It’s not only about Scorcese like stabbings, burying in the forest and all.

              Breaking bad wasn’t different, violence is omnipresent but the relationships inside their family/cartel/mob make those shows fascinating.
              I think there is an important difference between Sopranos and Breaking Bad:

              * Tony was a stereotypical bad guy in a stereotypical bad place trying to be more of a good guy.

              * Walter was a stereotypical good guy in a stereotypical good place trying to be more of a bad guy.

              Oddly, I found myself cheering for both even though they were clearly despicable by any objective standard.


              ***

              The last Breaking Bad episode sucked too.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by GB_FXST View Post
                I think there is an important difference between Sopranos and Breaking Bad:

                * Tony was a stereotypical bad guy in a stereotypical bad place trying to be more of a good guy.

                * Walter was a stereotypical good guy in a stereotypical good place trying to be more of a bad guy.

                Oddly, I found myself cheering for both even though they were clearly despicable by any objective standard.


                ***

                The last Breaking Bad episode sucked too.
                Absolutely - now, now, The Sopranos is a bit off my memory now and harder to find online, whereas BB is still fresh. Like most folks, I was rooting for Walter White almost the five seasons until I realized he just wanted to ‘spice his life up’ instead of the boring teacher life he was living and helping his family out.

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                • #9
                  Watched the box set of last few series of BB. Admittedly its well made and fittingly self destructing characters.. This box set idea was a good one without distracting advertising and missing episodes.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by _TallGuy_ View Post
                    The best scene of the series:

                    I thought that scene was funny, but the needle moved to far towards slapstick.

                    Personally, the scene where Tony’s evil sister got unexpectedly punched in the mouth and then she shortly thereafter murdered her wiseguy boyfriend who did it was epic.

                    It was one of the first unexpected deaths in serialised entertainment, before Game of Thrones turned it into a high volume hobby.

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