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  • #31
    Originally posted by EvilMinion View Post
    I'm very slowly making some improvements to my house - very slowly because my renovation budget is like tree fiddy - and I'm starting with the doors. I was complaining in another thread that I couldn't take down the French doors that lead into my lounge room because the screws were old and had been painted over, but I did manage to get another door down, and today I stripped and painted one side, and tomorrow I'll do the other side.
    Hi mate, sorry to hear your trouble with old screws.

    Here is a quick trick to help you with those old screws. Get a drill and 2 metal drillheads, a 4 and a 6 for example depending on the screw you want to remove. Drill a hole with the smaller one on the screw head less than a cm would do the trick for house door screws. Widen it a bit with the 4 drillhead, enough to insert the head of the 6 point inside, then hammer it inside. Then attach the drill to the point stucked in the screw, change the rotation of the drill to anticlockwise and with the initial momentun, you should be able to remove any screws before the drillhead widens the hole enough to set itself free.

    Oiling the damaged screws and trying to infiltrate the oil in the hole they are stucked before commencing the drilling will make the operation a smother business.

    If the drillhead is still stucked in the screw when you remove it, change rotation, screw it on a discarded piece of wood, while the drill makes its work widening the hole till it gets set free.

    Spent the summers helping my father as a carpenters aprentice since I was 14 till I left for University at 18. So I learnt a few things about tools carpentry, and so on and hauling, lets not forget hauling 10 fucking doors attached to their frames eight fucking floors because they didnt fit in the goddamned elevators.
    Last edited by Dercius; 03-03-2018, 02:44 PM.

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    • #32
      Dercius they're great tips, thank you.

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      • #33
        Alright brain trust, what's the best course of action for this. This is plasterboard that has taken a blow and dented inwards. It sort of slopes from right to left, so there's not really a hole that can be filled easily.










        Thanks in advance

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        • #34
          How big is it? Maybe cut the whole section out and replace with new section? Put batten supports on the nearest pieces of stud and attach the replacement bit to that? Putty in gaps and sand down.

          Of course, if it's only a small dent then that's massive overkill.

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          • #35
            That was my first thought, I just wanted to see if there were any less complex solutions thanks gaz.

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            • #36
              Well, this is just a thought that came to me. You know that spackle stuff that a person uses to fill in nail holes in sheet rock? Could you spread it on and make both sides even, let it dry, and then paint over it??

              http://homeguides.sfgate.com/fix-hol...ing-43565.html

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              • #37
                Thanks Cowboy's daughter, it's not really a hole so much as a dent, and it's quite big. The whole sheet is uneven as a result.

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                • #38
                  Being a lazy person I'd just use filler for that, bog it up to a state where you can sand it flat and paint over. Likely not the right way to do it but with older houses finding perfectly flat surfaces or 90 degree corners is a luxury!
                  Recently had the kitchen here redone, I did floor, skirting and painting and once it was all stripped back you could almost go cross eyed at how out of square and wobbly things were!

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                  • #39
                    Put a large piece of furniture in front of it. Seriously, I would use drywall mud to fill it in and smooth it over but ultimately the only correct fix is to replace it.

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                    • #40
                      Built a deck.



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                      • #41
                        ^^wow, that is a very nice wooden deck, nice color..congratulations sir digrar

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                        • #42
                          That looks like a very firm deck. I'm glad you showed us the photos.

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                          • #43
                            Everyone loves a good deck pic.

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by EvilMinion View Post
                              Everyone loves a good deck pic.
                              Quite a decent, big deck here.

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                              • #45
                                It's all about how you use your deck.

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