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  • Home Repair, Handyman Do-It-Yourself Thread

    Home Repair, Handyman Do-It-Yourself Thread

    If your wife complains you spend too much time at Home Depot or the hardware store then this may be the thread for you. Please share your tips, how to, experience, projects or knowledge.

    I'll start. I have some tenants that painted a hallway wall with that chalkboard paint and now they're moving out. It's about 80 sq ft of wall . What's the trick to repainting the wall? Google-fu doesn't give a straight answer and I know the painters will charge them and arm and a leg. (This will come out of their deposit, but they've been great tenants otherwise, so I'm trying to cut them some slack)

  • #2
    What is under the paint? Gypsum board, plaster, brick, concrete, CMU , wood?
    Personally I would hire a good painter, it's business, no slack to the tenant.

    My best experience with covering wall stains on gyp board is use Kiltz first which drys very white. then paint over that, you can't see the stain under kiltz. but like someone said if there is chalk on the board you will need to clean whatever markings is on the chalkboard completely, ....but Kiltz will cover most stains on gyp board, texture or not.
    Last edited by commanding; 30-09-2016, 01:25 PM.

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    • #3
      wash it to get rid of any chalk residue (sugar soap solution) - let it dry completely - sand it over with fine sandpaper - make sure you do the edges properly - then coat the entire wall with a decent oil based primer

      or just get someone in to sort it

      finally make sure you put in the tenancy agreement that you don't do stupid things like this to your property

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      • #4
        If it's green then put a blue light in the hallway and it will look yellow. How's that for easy?

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        • #5
          Thanks for the tips! It is in the lease so the tenants know they're on the hook. I do a pre-inspection walkthrough to give them some time to address any issues that would cause deductions in their deposits on final. I don't think they realized that it's not a simple paint over. Neither did I. Minor repair/paint comes with the territory but washing, sanding, primer then paint...I think I'll go with the advice of commanding. I hope the chalk murals of flowery pastures was worth it.

          BTW, it's 1/2" gypsum with acrylic paint under the chalk paint
          Originally posted by RobertKLR View Post
          If it's green then put a blue light in the hallway and it will look yellow. How's that for easy?
          Are you for hire?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Rapier55 View Post
            Thanks for the tips! It is in the lease so the tenants know they're on the hook. I do a pre-inspection walkthrough to give them some time to address any issues that would cause deductions in their deposits on final. I don't think they realized that it's not a simple paint over. Neither did I. Minor repair/paint comes with the territory but washing, sanding, primer then paint...I think I'll go with the advice of commanding. I hope the chalk murals of flowery pastures was worth it.

            BTW, it's 1/2" gypsum with acrylic paint under the chalk paint
            Are you for hire?
            I was halfway serious. Over the past year I've installed a lot of LED lighting and some was RGB lighting and a lot of customers have commented favorably about "seeing new colors" in old paint with the RGB lights. Although blue and green (blue light, green wall) should make cyan I've found many claim to see more yellow than cyan, me to. I intend to install some RGB lighting in my house this winter because white light derived from such a setup makes colors more vivid in my opinion and the light can be bright without being harsh.

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            • #7
              Need advice.

              I have plenty of woodwork in my house, all furniture, doors, cabinets, windows etc. are all solid teak, and pretty high quality wood at that. None of it is painted, and everything has been done with melamine polish. Now keep in mind that the wood is in prime condition, even though it's from a few decades to over a century and a quarter old, and I intend to keep it that way.

              From several coats of melamine, the wood has been stained from a lively golden to a darker copper red. I am now thinking of sanding off the melamine and going for a fresh polyurethane polish for increased durability and more natural shade of wood. Stupid idea or doable?

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              • #8
                I don't know where to put this information but it seems to belong here (do it yourself). I have a lot of documents accumulated that need to be destroyed. I looked at some document shredders but then I ran across an old WW2 veteran who handled classified docs in the war. He told of an incredibly simple way that doesn't really cost anything. He said to fill a pot with hot water from the tap and drop the paperwork in and let it soak for about a minute, then rip it up a couple of times then start kneading it like dough in the water. I did what he said and in less than 5 minutes I had reduced a thick stack of old paperwork to a dough-like substance that in no way could ever be reassembled to read anything. I then drained the excess water and threw it away. I've since disposed of quite a bit of incriminating evidence that way. Why didn't I think of this?

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                • #9
                  Ha ha... I actually used to do this about 20 years ago when I lived in an apartment and did not have a shredder. I didn't do the dough-kneading part, but I did soak things and rip them up quite a bit. Used to burn things in the farm's burn barrel back in the day. I tell Mom and Dad to do that still these days.

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