Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What are you currently reading?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Asterix in Switzerland. One of my favs from the series.

    Comment


    • Originally posted by Nancy View Post
      Asterix in Switzerland. One of my favs from the series.
      Not my own fave - I loved the one in Belgium... their early work was quite good and funny. I like to reread a comic classic every now and then.

      I once read one in English and I gotta admit the translators did a good job since translating those French puns into English wasn’t easy.

      Comment


      • Originally posted by Jake View Post

        Not my own fave - I loved the one in Belgium... their early work was quite good and funny. I like to reread a comic classic every now and then.

        I once read one in English and I gotta admit the translators did a good job since translating those French puns into English wasn’t easy.
        Yeah, love their earlier work too, you can really see the difference after Goscinny passed away (RIP). Was actually wanting to read the French version. Good to know it translated over well.

        Comment


        • Reading all the Expanse books... So I've just started, still not at the half of Levianthan's Wake. The differences with the TV show are insteresting.

          Comment


          • The 5 People you Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom. Most interesting book I've started this year and might actually finish. Scratch the last part, I'm most definitely going to finish it and not skip any pages.

            Comment


            • Try Tuesdays with Morrie. I can't remember either of them, but I remember them both being good.

              Comment


              • Exit West, by Mohsin Hamid. It starts in an unspecified city in the Middle East (feels like a thinly-disguised Aleppo), centered around a couple who meet and fall in love, with civil war encroaching on their city. They start to hear rumours of doors that can transport them anywhere in the world, and decide to seek one out so they can leave. As well as following the story of the main couple, the book is about the gradual erasure of borders as more and more people realise they can step through these doorways to anywhere they want, and what it means for states and communities if borders don't mean anything anymore. It's ultimately optimistic, and is a great book to read if you enjoy crying in public.

                You Will Know Me, by Megan Abbott. It's about a gymnastics community, and the main characters are a family who have a daughter who's on an Olympic track. A boy who works at the gym is killed in a hit and run (not a spoiler, it's the main plot point) and then it's about how the community reacts and secrets are revealed, and how a community that's so focused on achieving one goal can kind of close in on itself and act in horrible ways to protect itself in the interest of achieving this goal. I don't have kids, and those sorts of dramatised inter-parent interactions stress me out a bit. It's a horrible story about horrible people. I don't regret reading it, but it did leave me feeling kind of hollow.


                Currently reading The Hunger, by Alma Katsu, a novelised account of the Donner party. Should be a nice light palate cleanser

                Comment


                • Exit West sounds a bit like Monsters Inc. as far as doorways is concerned.

                  Comment


                  • Lol, similar, but less cute.

                    Comment


                    • Started on The Warhound and the World's Pain by Michael Moorcock. Centred around the 30 years war, it's about a knight who runs into Lucifer, after deciding one night to take off on his company of Poles, Swedes and Scots, and strikes a bargain to help him get back into God's good graces so ol Lucy doesn't drag his soul to an eternity in hell. Pretty decent so far, I skipped to the end when I first picked it up having no interest but now that I know the ending two weeks later I now need to know the beginning.

                      Comment


                      • Just started The Tolkien Reader.

                        Comment


                        • I am reading "The Dark Ages" by Charles Oman. I have uncovered an entire segment of human history, filled with incredible stories of kingdoms I never knew existed, wars of epic proportions I never knew happened, incredible tales of super soldiers and commanders that rivaled anything Hollywood ever portrayed. It is so full of palace intrigues, craven thieves, hero rulers who were astonishing for their cleverness and ability to rule over brigand bands of barbarians, eunuchs who were pledged to loyalty to their masters rising to become almost second in command of their empires. I was surprised to learn of some barbarian rulers who ruled with such enlightenment, they could have been the models the King Arthur legend was derived from. These are not my History Teacher's barbarians!

                          I ordinarily limited myself starting from the beginning of the Roman Republic through the end of the Roman Empire and then picked up History from there to start again about the 1500's to just about the immediate post-WWII- Korea, Vietnam eras. I pretty much know the rest from there (I believe). This left me a blank 1000 years to fill in. The next book is called the "Middle Ages)- I can't wait. What an astonishing period to read about.

                          If anyone out there is a scriptwriter of epic stories, an entire trove of original material and characters can be found in this awesome era of European human history.

                          Comment


                          • Sword and Scimitar by Simon Scarrow

                            A novel about the 1565 siege of Malta by the Ottoman Empire.

                            Comment


                            • Originally posted by Sandgroper View Post
                              Sword and Scimitar by Simon Scarrow

                              A novel about the 1565 siege of Malta by the Ottoman Empire.
                              I think I read that some years ago. One Hell of a story, that one.

                              Comment


                              • CAN'T HURT ME by David Goggings.
                                If anyone doesn't know who the guy is, look him up. Not my typical reading material, but I've got fascinated by the guy after seeing him for the first time on Joe Rogan podcast. One of the most rattling interviews on JRE I've seen, right up there with the first couple of Jordan Peterson's. I never had an experience of complete emotional engrossment (to the point of obsession) in a book, as I had with this one, especially the first half. I was literally chocked half the time. "Inspirational" or "gut-wrenching" don't even begin to describe the experience. This is not just another inspirational story or a self-help book (although it was kinda designed to fall in the latter category), this is a life Lesson with capital L. Can't recommend it enough.

                                Some other notable mentions:
                                Endurance by Scot Kelly. An autobiography by an American astronaut who recently spent a whole year in space. I'm a bit of a space geek so found this book fascinating on several levels. The fact that Kelly also comes from a rather humble background and had to fight his own demons in order to achieve his goals made the read surprisingly inspirational. Also surprisingly honest depiction of cooperation with Russians (which was hilarious to me, since I have a healthy appreciation of both Russian and US mentalities), NASA bureaucracy and all the shit the astronauts must endure in space (hence the name) - basically, all the stuff which usually doesn't really make it to public beyond the glossy image NASA like to put forward.

                                This video is hilarious, because this was the moment when Scott Kelly was frantically going through the emergency procedures for possible collision with space debris, and in the middle of all this was ordered to give a silly interview. If he and his Russian crewmate seem distracted, well, there is a good reason for this.

                                Red Moon by Kim Stanley Robinson. One of my favorite hard Sci-fi writers, but this one was just boring. He was always kinda heavy in his books on the political/left stuff, but his last two books, this one and New York 2140, read like political pamphlets disguised as Sci-fi.

                                Artemis by Andy Weir. Pretty enjoyable. Not the same level as the Martian, but still very solid hard Sci-fi with a good story.

                                Summerland by Hannu Rajaniemi. His first three novels were phenomenal, nothing as I have ever read before. This one was an attempt at more conventional phantasy/Sci-fi and it felt like he was out of his element.

                                12 Rules For Life by Jordan Peterson. I was following him pretty close since his appearance of the public scene, so was not much new for me in the book. I was kinda surprised by the amount of the politics/ideology related stuff in the book. I was somehow counting on more psychology-oriented material. He basically put there everything he is usually talking about. Not really disappointed, just surprised.

                                Blink by Malcolm Gladwell. He's such a fantastic storyteller. Listening to an audiobook narrated by him was a special treat.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X