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  • Sniffit
    started a topic Soyuz launch failed, crew makes emergency landing

    Soyuz launch failed, crew makes emergency landing

    NASA astronaut Nick Hague and Roscosmos' Alexei Ovchinin lifted off as scheduled at 2:40 p.m. (0840 GMT; 4:40 a.m. EDT) Thursday from the Russia-leased Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan atop a Soyuz booster rocket. They were to dock at the orbiting outpost six hours later, but the booster suffered a failure minutes after the launch.
    Russian and U.S. space officials said that the crew is heading for an emergency landing in Kazakhstan at an unspecified time. Search and rescue crews are getting ready to reach the expected landing site.
    Source: https://phys.org/news/2018-10-russia...gency.html#jCp

    It's a developing situation. Some news outlets have stated that they have already landed and rescue crews are on their way.

  • ak16
    replied
    Originally posted by moosefoot View Post
    And "Soyuz MS-11" launched yesterday:
    https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2018...space-station/

    Less than two months after the in-flight abort of MS-10.

    eeedit: Video:



    Roscosmos has definitely upped the production value recently.


    Interestingly, the greatest g-forces experienced during ascent appear just prior to first stage separation and are about 3.7 G. This is about the same order of magnitude as the longitudinal acceleration required for G-force-induced blackout (G-LOC) for an untrained individual without specialized equipment. However, since the cosmonauts are in a prone position during ascent (G-LOC is significantly higher - red curve in the graph below), this means that any Joe Blo can theoretically jump into a Soyuz and take a ride to the ISS without too much discomfort





    PS: Hmmmmm.....this raises an interesting question...... why are fighter planes that have pilot seats in the prone position not a common sight? Since we are now at a point where a tank crew can be placed inside the hull and rely solely on sensors for situational awareness, it seems that the same approach could be utilized for combat pilots.
    Last edited by ak16; 04-12-2018, 06:19 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Telmar
    replied
    Those Soyouz rockets are reliable...perhaps only workmanship needs a kick in the a$$ in Baikonour. The Russians have years of experience in perfecting these ships.

    Can´t wait to see the new Orion go up: ...and maybe a new trip to the moon in my lifetime. That would be something.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ivan le Fou
    replied
    I have to say I was nervous while watching the MS-10 taking off. "Please don't blow up, please don't blow up, please don't blow up"

    Leave a comment:


  • moosefoot
    replied
    And "Soyuz MS-11" launched yesterday:
    https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2018...space-station/

    Less than two months after the in-flight abort of MS-10.

    eeedit: Video:



    Roscosmos has definitely upped the production value recently.

    Last edited by moosefoot; 03-12-2018, 11:07 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • moosefoot
    replied
    Originally posted by moosefoot View Post
    Prior to the December launch, another three Soyuz rockets will fly, including a Progress cargo ship launch to the ISS on November 16th and an European Space Agency launch from French Guyana on November 7th (Soyuz-2 with ESA's MetOp-C satellite).
    Well, now all three have gone up and it's all worked out just fine.

    Progress MS-10 (Progress 71 according to NASA's own classification) launched the other day:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ip6VAKfTKyU

    And performed its automatic ISS docking procedure yesterday:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dsPnUqOCWmk

    So, Soyuz MS-11 with a three-man crew (well, two men, one woman) is all set for December 3rd.

    I like it! At first I was sure they'd be stuck until next year after the MS-10 abort, but nope.

    (as for the other two November Soyuz launches I mentioned, here's the November 7th ESA launch from French Guyana:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R5t5_LXKvMk

    And here's the Russian GLONASS-M launch from Plesetsk I didn't mention by name at the time, but that was one of the three:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=54lqhWuM3uQ
    )

    Leave a comment:


  • Telmar
    replied
    Originally posted by Ivan le Fou View Post

    Awesome footage. And the clarity and quality of it make it even more so.


    It is also "amazing", so to speak, that a mere deformed captor can cause such a catastrophe.
    At these speeds and at such power there is no margin for anything. A rocket is at Mach 1 in less than a minute. The explosion in the Apollo 13 service module was caused by a spark igniting oxygen in a a tank that lost its air tightness simply by being dropped once before being installed. It´s that sensitive for everyone when you´re at the maximum of what the elements can do.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ivan le Fou
    replied
    Originally posted by Telmar View Post
    From what I read, a captor was deformed during assembly and led to the booster seperation problem. So a Baikonour final assembly problem, not a manufacturing one.
    Awesome footage. And the clarity and quality of it make it even more so.


    It is also "amazing", so to speak, that a mere deformed captor can cause such a catastrophe.

    Leave a comment:


  • moosefoot
    replied
    Originally posted by moosefoot View Post

    Nowadays they have external cameras on the Soyuz, and while it is not likely that anything will be released publicly anytime soon I do hope to see it at some stage.
    Came way sooner than I thought, and indeed the footage seems to confirm what everyone's been saying since the beginning. One of the boosters failed to separate at the top and it pushed on the core stage, causing the rocket to veer violently off course, which triggered the emergency escape system.

    Anyway, props to Roscosmos for being a bit more transparent than they usually are, that's cool. They typically keep all these materials to themselves, only issuing some kind of power point slide with illustrations, at best.

    Leave a comment:


  • Telmar
    replied
    Originally posted by Euroamerican View Post
    Thanks , Merk666, of posting that awesome video! it sure does appear that the remaining booster stack got bumped out of the intended trajectory, but maybe that was just the section that had tha aft-viewing camera on it?
    At 1mn25, it seems to me you can see the booster on the left still attached to to second stage by its upper tip. Amazing video, thanks Merk666. It´s amazing the altitude gain in so little time, these are monster rides, defintely not for everyone.

    Leave a comment:


  • Telmar
    replied
    From what I read, a captor was deformed during assembly and led to the booster seperation problem. So a Baikonour final assembly problem, not a manufacturing one.

    Leave a comment:


  • Euroamerican
    replied
    Thanks , Merk666, of posting that awesome video! it sure does appear that the remaining booster stack got bumped out of the intended trajectory, but maybe that was just the section that had tha aft-viewing camera on it?

    Leave a comment:


  • merk666
    replied
    video of incident from onboard camera -

    Leave a comment:


  • moosefoot
    replied
    They said today that they will proceed with Soyuz MS-11 on December 3rd. Investigation is done and the issue has been rectified.

    Prior to the December launch, another three Soyuz rockets will fly, including a Progress cargo ship launch to the ISS on November 16th and an European Space Agency launch from French Guyana on November 7th (Soyuz-2 with ESA's MetOp-C satellite).

    Leave a comment:


  • moosefoot
    replied
    ^ They're not done yet, officially at least, but this morning they launched a Soyuz 2.1b successfully. That rocket is sliiiiightly different from the "man-rated" Soyuz FG but AFAIK the first (boosters) and second (core) stages are essentially identical and it was there that the MS-10 cockup occurred.

    So, I take it they are feeling confident enough.

    Leave a comment:

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