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Donald Trump Is Still Setting Up Concentration Camps on American Soil

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  • #61
    Not so sure about that. The peasant folk either moved away or accepted the new rulers and got on with their lives. While I'm sure it was traumatic for the old rulers, that's not the same as the "kill them all" approach. Even the famed "kill them all and let God sort it out" approach was the exception rather than the rule.

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    • #62
      Originally posted by tanks_alot View Post

      Something to do with being butthurt about this? (Also, those are a lot of fellatio euphemisms, Asheren) http://themess.net/forum/political-d...2%80%99/page21
      Nah, I don't really care about it tbh.

      Originally posted by tanks_alot View Post
      If it'll calm your tits, no one here likes Bibi's joint statement with your PM, so on one's happy. Get over it...
      I don't care about this either.

      Comment


      • #63
        Trump administration must stop giving psychotropic drugs to migrant children without consent, judge rule
        https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.c58744884bd3

        A federal judge on Monday found that U.S. government officials have been giving psychotropic medication to migrant children at a Texas facility without first seeking the consent of their parents or guardians, in violation of state child welfare laws.

        Comment


        • #64
          Originally posted by Fargin View Post
          Trump administration must stop giving psychotropic drugs to migrant children without consent, judge rule
          https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.c58744884bd3
          WTF US? WTF?

          How is this even remotely possible?

          Comment


          • #65
            Apparently it's okay because Mexicans are rapists.

            Comment


            • #66
              Too bad he isn't throwing the people in Austin who want to change Austin's name, in those concentration camps. ....

              Comment


              • #67
                Originally posted by Fargin View Post
                Trump administration must stop giving psychotropic drugs to migrant children without consent, judge rule
                https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/...=.c58744884bd3
                I wonder who runs this crappy facility?

                So. they had a problem before Trump!

                Shiloh is one of many shelters contracted by the U.S. Office of Refugee Resettlement to house immigrant children.

                Most immigrant children in U.S. custody are in nonsecure facilities. But others are in a range of higher-security facilities. A secure facility is the most restrictive option, with a physically secure structure and staff trained to control violent behavior — much like a juvenile detention center. A “staff-secure” facility may have a secure perimeter, such as a fence, and a higher staff-to-child ratio, but is not equipped with locked cells. Residential treatment centers are assigned to children who are determined to pose a danger to themselves or others.

                Shiloh is a collection of trailers and small buildings that can house up to 44 children, 32 of them immigrants, according to the Center for Investigative Reporting, which has reported extensively on the facility. It has been contracted to house immigrant children deemed unaccompanied minors since 2013 and was also set to receive children separated from their parents under the Trump administration.

                The facility also has a history of troubling practices, including allegations of child abuse, according to the Center for Investigative Reporting. A local congresswoman called for Shiloh to be shut down four years ago after the Houston Chronicle reported on long-running allegations of physical violence, excessive use of physical restraints and several deaths of children in custody.

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                • #68
                  Federal agency's shelter oversight raises questions

                  Photo of Susan Carroll
                  Susan Carroll Dec. 20, 2014 Updated: Dec. 21, 2014 10:19 a.m.

                  https://www.houstonchronicle.com/new...es-5969617.php



                  MANVEL - At the end of a two-lane county road, inside a cluster of brick duplexes, the federal government houses some of the most traumatized children caught crossing the border.

                  Shiloh Treatment Center Inc. cared for the Honduran orphan who couldn't stop crying, the petite trafficking victim, the 17-year-old fresh off a stint in juvenile jail.

                  For that, the U.S. government pays a premium: $5.1 million for 32 beds last fiscal year.
                  U.S. Rep. Pete Olson, R-Texas, said he wondered why such a small facility is so expensive and whether the children there are safe. So one day this summer, he went looking for answers and knocked on the door of Shiloh's main office, a 1970s-era mobile home.

                  A woman politely slipped him a piece of paper with a phone number for the Office of Refugee Resettlement in Washington, D.C.
                  Then she shut the door.

                  "We have no idea what is going on down there," Olson said.

                  The extent of ORR's oversight is unclear.

                  For years, children in custody at Shiloh have complained of physical abuses and painful restraints, a review of state licensing reports shows. Nearly four years ago, the state shut down another treatment center founded by the same Texas businessman after the death of a foster child who'd been restrained in a closet. The Brazoria County district attorney wrote letters to ORR months later, urging the federal government to increase monitoring at Shiloh.


                  Despite the warning and complaints, ORR exempts treatment centers like Shiloh from its policy requiring shelters to notify it each time a child is restrained or injected with "emergency medicine" - potent psychotropic drugs. The agency has not responded to a Freedom of Information Act request filed by the Houston Chronicle in January for monitoring reports and other communication with Shiloh.

                  Clay Dean Hill, Shiloh's president, said staff members are "deeply concerned about the security and well-being of the children they serve." He said the center's cost per bed, roughly double that of a standard shelter bed in ORR's network, is justified because of its specialized mental health services.

                  ORR, a small agency operating under the Department of Health and Human Services, has been overwhelmed by a record number of children from Central America.

                  Congress is pressuring ORR to increase its oversight of its shelter network, which is run primarily by nonprofit organizations and a handful of for-profit companies. When ORR began contracting with Shiloh in 2009, the network had about 50 facilities. Today, there are 125.

                  All told, ORR spent $912 million on unaccompanied children last year.
                  This fall, a group of senators called for the U.S. Government Accountability Office to review ORR's financial oversight of grantees and its ability to accommodate the influx of children. Lawmakers ordered ORR in March 2013 to write regulations to comply with the Prison Rape Elimination Act, to strengthen standards for preventing and punishing abuse. The agency released a copy of the proposed rule on Friday that sets a June deadline for shelters to meet the new guidelines.

                  Olson said he called ORR with questions about Shiloh this summer, and it sent him a letter with basic information. He remains frustrated.

                  "The one thing that comes out over and over is the lack of transparency," he said. "Tell us what is going on down there."

                  more at link!!

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                  • #69
                    Clay Dean Hill has been around a long time


                    Campfire Horror Story
                    How Carole Keeton Strayhorn and the state destroyed a healing camp for kids
                    By Jordan Smith, Fri., Nov. 21, 2008

                    https://www.austinchronicle.com/news...-horror-story/

                    The Strayhorn Steamroller

                    2008

                    Concerns about the Texas foster-care system exploded into headlines in late October 2003, when The Dallas Morning News published a piece about the Houston-area Daystar Resi*dent*ial Treatment Center, which housed emotionally disturbed foster kids. According to the Morning News, not only was Daystar founder Clay Dean Hill apparently making a mint from the system – he received more than $1.5 million in salary in 2002 – his companies were also doing quite well, earning more than $4 million for their services to the state that same year. However, some of Daystar's wards weren't doing nearly so well: Children were living in "isolated trailers," and in 2002, a girl died in Daystar's care, the daily reported. According to state regulators, the girl's death was "blamed on insufficiently trained staff, poor supervision and the use of 'excessive force' to control the child."

                    It certainly wasn't the first time the foster-care system had been the subject of bad news, but the Daystar piece released a political flood. "The system had come to one of those periodic points where the job was overwhelming the resources," said one longtime observer of the system.

                    Three days later, Strayhorn responded to the story with shocked incredulity – and a promise that her office would get to the bottom of whatever problems DFPS might be hiding. "The whole thing is about accountability. Where are those dollars being spent, and on who?" she said. "Children are not only our most precious resource; these are our most vulnerable children." Strayhorn announced she would undertake an immediate and sweeping performance review of the child-welfare system. "I really can think of no better place to put our time and resources." It did not go unnoticed that her vow came at the beginning of the 2004 political season, amid the widespread presumption that Strayhorn was considering a run for governor.

                    When Gaines first heard of Strayhorn's plans, she was pleased. Taking care of children removed from their families is a tough job, not only for the foster parents and group homes where the children land but also for the agency and workers tasked with ensuring their safety. Child Protective Services caseworkers are a beleaguered bunch – with potentially hundreds of cases on each worker's plate, generating relentless turnover. The attrition rate at CPS is roughly 34%. The Child Care Licensing division has a more modest turnover rate of 9.6%, but with fewer than 100 caseworkers and more than 10,000 foster facilities to monitor, the job can be daunting. (In 2003, there were more than 25,000 children in the foster system, and the state spent more than $315 million to take care of them. In 2007, the number of kids in custody of the state had grown to more than 33,000, with a cost for the state of nearly $371 million.)

                    In Gaines' mind, Strayhorn's investigation would root out inefficiencies and confirm that child protection caseworkers are seriously overworked and that the system is seriously underfunded, considering the size of the population it is intended to serve. "I thought: 'What? A politician interested in the foster-care system? I'm on board!'" she recalled. "I was so naive."

                    Six months later, Strayhorn's staff had finished its review, and the comptroller convened a dramatic press conference to publicize the result, a 292-page report titled "Forgotten Children." With a plethora of charts and plenty of melodramatic photos, Strayhorn announced that the foster system lacked leadership and oversight and tolerated wildly disparate standards of care that ultimately put thousands of children at risk. "The truth is that some of these children are no better off in the care of the state than they were in the hands of abusive and negligent parents," Strayhorn said.

                    Strayhorn's visual aids included poster-size photos from the report that purported to depict the deplorable conditions Strayhorn and her investigative staff found during "unannounced" visits to various residential facilities. These included shots of grimy sleeping and food-storage areas, bathrooms, and recreational areas. The offending facilities were roundly lambasted. (Strayhorn personally made 11 visits to the various facilities, she said, while her staff conducted 26 "surprise" inspections.) "I saw filthy living conditions, makeshift outhouses, unsanitary food storage," Strayhorn told the assembled reporters. "That's not care. That's cruelty. That's not educating. That's endangering."

                    Although Strayhorn didn't name the facilities she'd singled out for criticism, those at the facilities immediately knew they'd been targeted. Gaines and her staff saw right away that many of the pictures of the supposedly "filthy" facilities were in fact pictures of various parts of Woodside Trails – including the report's most enduring image of what Strayhorn called a "pee wall," a crudely built urinal in the woods near one of the campsites. Gaines and others connected to Woodside Trails were shocked – primarily because the characterizations of the facilities depicted were taken out of context or completely fabricated, says Gaines.

                    The feeding frenzy had begun. There were editorials in major dailies applauding Stray*horn's efforts and decrying "substandard" facilities and care, and Texas House Speaker Tom Craddick empaneled a special committee to investigate the system.

                    Gaines and the Woodside Trails board of directors decided to fight. "I can just tell you [Strayhorn] twisted and turned and misrepresented so much in that report," Gaines told the Houston Chronicle. The problem, Gaines said, was that Strayhorn was simply "upset by the whole idea of therapeutic camping" – a concept the comptroller obviously didn't understand. "We do good work here. We work with really, really difficult children. The outdoor setting is part of the philosophy."


                    read more at link about allegations being dropped against Gaines etc Vindication

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                    • #70
                      ^^^ As much as the title wants to blame Trump, this is ~100% an issue of the facilities and the lack of oversight.

                      U.S. Office of Refugee Resettlement should indeed stop working with these people (which puts them between a rock and a hard place, as they need to find a way to take care of the children of illegals).

                      But why doesn't a prosecutor investigate all this? The situation reported sounds horrific to me...


                      P.S. I stand by my WTF since I really did not expect to hear anything like this happening in present US.

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        Originally posted by BogT View Post
                        ^^^ As much as the title wants to blame Trump, this is ~100% an issue of the facilities and the lack of oversight.

                        U.S. Office of Refugee Resettlement should indeed stop working with these people (which puts them between a rock and a hard place, as they need to find a way to take care of the children of illegals).

                        But why doesn't a prosecutor investigate all this? The situation reported sounds horrific to me...


                        P.S. I stand by my WTF since I really did not expect to hear anything like this happening in present US.
                        As far as I'm concerned, worse than this happens to our Veterans trying to get help at the VA. You should read some of the family members' stories.

                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Originally posted by Cowboy's daughter View Post

                          As far as I'm concerned, worse than this happens to our Veterans trying to get help at the VA. You should read some of the family members' stories.
                          As bad as veterans may get treated (I did hear of some problems), they can still have a choice of treatment (in theory).

                          Mistreating and forcefully medicating kids to be complacent in lieu of taking care of them, kids that the government has in its custody and were given no choice in the matter, is much worst in my book.

                          But it's more of an apples and oranges comparison...


                          Comment


                          • #73
                            Originally posted by BogT View Post

                            As bad as veterans may get treated (I did hear of some problems), they can still have a choice of treatment (in theory).

                            Mistreating and forcefully medicating kids to be complacent in lieu of taking care of them, kids that the government has in its custody and were given no choice in the matter, is much worst in my book.

                            But it's more of an apples and oranges comparison...

                            THAT IS absolutely not true. ...It isn't apples and oranges, it's people!!
                            I just read a person post on my friend's fb page about her stepfather: denied for over ten years the hip replacement that he desperately needed. He was told to lose fifty pounds and then they would do it. He lost a hundred and they still denied him. He was on so many medications that when he went into the hospital his wife brought them in one of those gallon baggies, but she couldn't close the bag there were so many. His step daughter believed that was the reason that several times his blood pressure got down to 40/20. No, that is not a typo. A month before he died from heart failure, he was told that his heart was in great shape. By a doctor at the VA.

                            also


                            Veteran commits suicide hours after being turned away at VA facility – Rest In Peace


                            https://americanmilitarynews.com/201...ource=popsmoke


                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Originally posted by BogT View Post

                              As bad as veterans may get treated (I did hear of some problems), they can still have a choice of treatment (in theory).
                              I've been trying two years now to get disability with no luck so that choice of treatment is garbage

                              Originally posted by BogT View Post
                              kids that the government has in its custody and were given no choice in the matter, is much worst in my book.

                              the nation state of the dictatorship of Kalifornia actually says vaccinate your kids or go to jail, and while that issue there is from Texas, it applies to illegals here too....

                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Futhermore, if you don't want your kids to go to some center for migrant children, don't bring them, or send them, here illegally.

                                But our Veterans are citizens of the United States, and have served their country.

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