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Commonwealth in secret succession plans

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  • #16
    A while ago I read an essay in a magazine for international constitutional law that indeed predicted a large crisis to follow Charles's ascension to the throne. I had always supposed Elizabeth II filled the role the system granted her entirely, but it appears she doesn't. She's not so much restricted as she chose to restrict herself. Turns out the monarch of the United Kingdom holds (at least in the UK) powers absolutely incompatible with the slightest notion of democracy.

    Of course potential actions of the monarch would be contested left and right but that doesn't negate the fact that Britain's kings and queens formally retain these powers even today.

    Among these were (if memory serves me well) the right to order arrests and seizures of property; full judicial authority over peace-breakers; the right to declare war without consulting the parliament; the right to sack the government and call fresh elections at any given moment; and full ownership of Britain's waters blue, green or brown.

    The authors argued that since Charles is a very political person and even writes letters to the government on a regular basis to make his views known, he might as well try and exercise aforesaid powers once bestowed with them.

    The irony is strong, ain't it. Britain's journey to democracy commenced with the restriction of royal power at the hands of lesser lords; today, with the lords a dying breed and their chamber of parliament stripped of its olden power, the monarch's rights outclass theirs once more. The old bird outlived them all.

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    • #17
      breki

      a little light bedtime reading - The Queen
      By J.G. Noll Today is Queen Elizabeth’s Sapphire Jubilee, which means she’s been on the British throne for 65 years. The queen is known for her …

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      • #18
        Originally posted by gaz View Post
        I'm not really a Monarchist (Though I'm certainly not anti either) so as far as the Commonwealth goes I think I'd definitely rather see it move away from being tied to the Crown and indeed tied to Britain. If you look at the breadth of nations in the Commonwealth there must be some excellent candidates out there.

        Apart from the Com games, what does the Commonwealth actually get up to as a group? It's a mamby pamby group think tank that achieves bugger all as far as I can see. The change of monarchy would be a perfect time to box it up and put it into storage.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by digrar View Post
          Apart from the Com games, what does the Commonwealth actually get up to as a group? It's a mamby pamby group think tank that achieves bugger all as far as I can see. The change of monarchy would be a perfect time to box it up and put it into storage.
          I'm ok with it not exactly being NATO, but it's nice to maintain little links to our history and recognising the similarities between our nations. For example Commonwealth citizens can vote here in the UK and Brits resident in Australia can vote there I believe.

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          • #20
            I had to look this up. The only Permanent Residents that can vote in Australian Elections are British Citizens who were enrolled to vote prior to 1984. I'm assuming that's a pretty small demographic. I'm surprised they still get a vote.

            For the main part, I reckon the ICC is a more relevant body for keeping the main Commonwealth nations engaged (Sorry Canada, start playing cricket if you want to be in the cool gang).

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            • #21
              Originally posted by digrar View Post
              I had to look this up. The only Permanent Residents that can vote in Australian Elections are British Citizens who were enrolled to vote prior to 1984. I'm assuming that's a pretty small demographic. I'm surprised they still get a vote.
              Interesting. Over here it's any Commonwealth citizen with indefinite leave to remain in the UK, which is not a tiny demographic by any stretch of the imagination.

              https://www.yourvotematters.co.uk/ca...gister-to-vote

              NATIONALITY You qualify to register to vote if you are:
              • a British citizen
              • a qualifying Commonwealth citizen resident in the UK
              • an EU citizen resident in the UK
              A qualifying Commonwealth citizen is someone who has leave to enter or remain in the UK, or does not require such leave.
              Originally posted by digrar View Post
              For the main part, I reckon the ICC is a more relevant body for keeping the main Commonwealth nations engaged (Sorry Canada, start playing cricket if you want to be in the cool gang).
              That and rugby.

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              • #22
                Cricket is for suckers

                Otherwise what you say is true. Being from a Commonwealth country gives me zero privileges down under.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by Corrupt View Post

                  Interesting. Over here it's any Commonwealth citizen with indefinite leave to remain in the UK, which is not a tiny demographic by any stretch of the imagination.

                  https://www.yourvotematters.co.uk/ca...gister-to-vote





                  That and rugby.
                  Yeah, don’t you guys let Irish people vote in your elections?

                  Maybe that’s the problem

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by breki View Post
                    Yeah, don’t you guys let Irish people vote in your elections?

                    Maybe that’s the problem
                    We do yes.

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                    • #25
                      Both Irish's?

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                      • #26
                        Imagine the madness. Allowing citizens of a country that hates you to vote in your elections

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by digrar View Post
                          Both Irish's?
                          Northern Irish people are British Citizens, so they can vote anyway. Republic of Ireland citizens are also entitled to vote here. I assume it's some weird quirk of the Good Friday Agreement and the eligability of Northern Irish people to have Irish passports if they want.

                          EDIT It's way older apparently

                          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ninth_...ion_of_Ireland

                          A bill, the Electoral Amendment Bill 1983 had sought to give the right to vote for all elections and referendums to British citizens. This bill was referred to the Irish Supreme Court by the Irish President and the court found it to be unconstitutional. The purpose of the Ninth Amendment was to allow UK citizens resident in the Republic to vote in Dáil elections. This was to reciprocate the Ireland Act 1949, which had granted Irish citizens resident in the UK the right to vote in elections to the British parliament after the Irish Government had, by leaving the Commonwealth and enacting the Republic of Ireland Act 1948 removed such rights in existing British law from Irish citizens in the UK.

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                          • #28
                            Yeah I knew the Northern Irish were citizens. So the Southerners are essentially like the Commonwealth nations, if you're a Resident, you get a vote.

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                            • #29
                              I'm assuming voting is compulsory for citizens in the UK, probably not for Residents? Or compluslory if you're enrolled at any rate?

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by digrar View Post
                                Yeah I knew the Northern Irish were citizens. So the Southerners are essentially like the Commonwealth nations, if you're a Resident, you get a vote.
                                Basically, except there's freedom to move here because of the EU (for now), wheras other Commonwealth citizens would have to apply for residency. Prior to the EU, there was the "Common Travel Area"

                                https://www.gov.uk/government/public...on-travel-area
                                Under the CTA, UK and Irish nationals enjoy a range of reciprocal rights - for example:
                                • the right to enter and reside in each others’ state without being subject to a requirement to obtain permission
                                • the right to work without being subject to a requirement to obtain permission
                                • the right to access education
                                • access to social welfare entitlements and benefits
                                • access to health services
                                • access to social housing
                                • the right to vote in local and parliamentary elections.

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