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Habitat for Humanity to convert shipping containers into homes for affordable housing

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  • #16
    Originally posted by commanding View Post

    HisRoyalHighness the cheapest land per acre in Texas I have seen is the semi arid desert near the big bend area right up close to the Mexican border, if one can put up with 1. the desert, 2. the illegal immigants and drug dealers coming from Mexico and 3. possibly no electricity much less water and/or sewage utilities in the desert. (no trees at all)

    We looked in 360 degrees of DFW for hunting land with a small cabin, and looked from about Abliene to the west to Texarkana on the east and down to near Menard and Junction area, up north to near McAllester Oklahoma. We found a well wooded and wild place of 1/8 section in Coal County Oklahoma that would fit out budget and bought it around 2013 or so. small metal cabin with structural steel frame up off the ground by 24" on steel columns, has electricity but no water or sewer. So we have a refrigerator and microwave, TV and window air conditioner, but no running water, so we haul it up therein 6 gallon jugs. The mtl cabin is only about 20'x24' and we have a cast iron wood burn stove for heat.
    Thanks for the advice Commanding!

    Are the narcos that big of a problem?

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    • #17
      Originally posted by HisRoyalHighness View Post

      Thanks for the advice Commanding!

      Are the narcos that big of a problem?
      I don't personally know about that, only what I hear on the TV and read online. it sounds bad further south down near McAllen and farther south Texas and also near Falcon Resovoir on the Rio Grande river.

      https://www.landandfarm.com/search/?...&CurrentPage=1

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      • #18
        I know a developer here in Miami built an entire series of offices and restaurant spaces using shipping containers. It has worked really well.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by commanding View Post

          CD, I have had friends and family who suggested I lease out hunting on our land, but I believe I will not do it......in my lifetime....as that causes a lot of issues, any hunters would want to use the cabin, nope. .....and they would leave trash and human waste, and 4 wheel tracks all over which would accidently run over the kill our land turtles which now we have a good crop of. When I was going up there every month, I would take a tow sack and pick up trash from along the roads, beer cans bottles, broken glass etc along the road bisecting our land in the bar ditches. I even bought wild flower seed and spread it in the bar ditch areas along the roads to get wild flowers going, and put up around 40 no trespass metal signs, and really cleaned up the roadways.

          the wooded areas (most of the land) is really virgin type cross timber looking oak, walnuts, etc. Really pre-1492 looking woodland with native animals, sandstone, birds and native creekbeds. Just exactly what I wanted, scores of deer, wild turkey, bobcats, owls, woodpeckers, fireflys,etc. So I won't lease mine.


          that is very nice, It nice to hear "music" from wildlife and the feeling (smell, sight and wind in face feel etc etc) from thick forest etc etc...I wish I can do the same

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          • #20
            I work in a lab build in a container in my last society.
            It's a good idea to make it transportable by every possible mean (truck, ship, air...), just need electricity, water and to be supplied with our chemicals and let's go.
            the presentation video:
            https://vimeo.com/170947222

            A friend of me want to place a shipping container underground in his garden as a storage place. Just have to reinforce the top before placing ground on it.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by urielventis View Post
              I work in a lab build in a container in my last society.
              It's a good idea to make it transportable by every possible mean (truck, ship, air...), just need electricity, water and to be supplied with our chemicals and let's go.
              the presentation video:
              https://vimeo.com/170947222

              A friend of me want to place a shipping container underground in his garden as a storage place. Just have to reinforce the top before placing ground on it.
              The lab in a container is amazing!

              I can see placing a container underground as a garden storage place. It could have steps, stairs going down, like an old-fashioned cellar.

              http://newsok.com/article/3673016

              I've also read articles about persons building places to sell food out of one. Like a stationary food truck.

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              • #22
                Attended a exhibit re: contstuction, tools etc etc. Saw this container housing, it looks like a less than a 20 footer (visual estimates ) cost about $3k (Php 1: US $ 50). not toilet. Unit comes with toiler if will cost additional.

                cannot find the phamplet with all the cost etc. so see attached.


                http://www.smarthouseprefab.com.ph/p...container.html

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                • #23
                  This is a Texas company. See photos on link.

                  https://www.backcountrycontainers.com/

                  Based in Needville, Texas, we work with customers across the state to design and construct their dream container homes. Whether you are looking for a primary residence or a secondary dwelling, Backcountry Containers’ custom designs provide a unique, modern, durable, and cost-effective home.

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                  • #24
                    Texas Container Homes blogspot. Doesn't sell, will help you find, he says.

                    http://texascontainerhomes.blogspot.com/

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                    • #25
                      IMHO,Cowboys Daughter good thread, your posting gave me ideas, in case I buy a unit, for i am no architect, so you post help stir some imagination

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                      • #26
                        FDF has used them at least since the 90:s. In semi-arctic or arctic conditions its highly recommendable to lift them a bit above ground and have a extra tilted roof and to keep at least a little heat going on or have a dryer inside.

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                        • #27
                          I had to manually unload them in a previous job. They are hot and often stink of the most ungodly pesticides. However, a decent wash and insulation and you have a near indestructible home.

                          They would make a great bomb shelter too!

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by Kilgor View Post
                            I had to manually unload them in a previous job. They are hot and often stink of the most ungodly pesticides. However, a decent wash and insulation and you have a near indestructible home.

                            They would make a great bomb shelter too!
                            pesticides??? they think pesticides may be the cause of Parkinson's disease from what I read. and I suspect herbicides also.


                            https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...he-connection/

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by commanding View Post

                              pesticides??? they think pesticides may be the cause of Parkinson's disease from what I read. and I suspect herbicides also.
                              Yeah, one container I had to unload had been recently sprayed for bugs or something. The chemical smell was near unbearable. I could have been cleaning agent, but sure as heck smelt like bug spray.

                              It was so bad we had to unload in short shifts.

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                              • #30
                                ^--- Yep..... Better make sure your containers are rated for use as a habitation...... Oh, is there even such a rating or overwatch?

                                I know at least three people who've come down with it in the last five years. Environmental sources of these conditions, plus cancers, make me nervous about accidental exposure sources. By the way, pallets loaded into shipping containers are themselves sometimes heavily sprayed to prevent accidental migratory distribution of pest insects.
                                -----------
                                I worry about these "little houses" a we bit, in that I suspect an effort will be attempted by many local housing authorities and zoning agencies to use them to shove their favorite targets of social justice housing into existing suburban neighborhoods where the lots are still not totally covered by structures. Also, there are some people who periodically try to "split" an existing lot, with an existing house, for profit when they find and buy a lot that has enough room on the side to squeeze a "skinny house in", thus annoying all the existing neighbors forever.

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