Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Habitat for Humanity to convert shipping containers into homes for affordable housing

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Habitat for Humanity to convert shipping containers into homes for affordable housing


    Habitat for Humanity to convert shipping containers into homes for affordable housing in McKinney

    https://www.dallasnews.com/news/news...using-mckinney

    For now, it's just a sliver of land and an old abandoned house at the corner of Bumpas and Fitzhugh streets on McKinney's east side.

    But if all goes according to plan, town homes built from shipping containers will begin rising up within a year on the site.

    Named The Cotton Groves, the community is a new stock of affordable housing planned for the northern Collin County suburb.


    North Collin County Habitat for Humanity purchased the nearly three-acre plot on the city's east side in November. Last month, McKinney City Council members unanimously approved plans for the 35-unit neighborhood development.
    This map shows the site for the proposed Cotton Groves development. (City of McKinney)
    This map shows the site for the proposed Cotton Groves development.
    (City of McKinney)
    'An expensive place to live'

    Shipping containers for homes isn't a new idea, but it's a first for the Collin County nonprofit. Habitat's design advisory group, the JDL group, pitched the idea for the higher-density container home community because of their sturdiness, low-cost, quick-build and ability to house more people.

    "Cost of living in McKinney is not low. It's an expensive place to live," McKinney Mayor George Fuller said. "We have a lot of industry, a lot of businesses that depend on a labor force that quite frankly can't afford to live in the city."
    Each home will be made of four shipping containers to make-up a 1,280-square-foot home. The homes will feature three bedrooms, two bathrooms, a second-floor balcony and covered carport.
    Habitat plans to sell the homes to people at 30 percent of their gross monthly income. Qualified applicants must have lived or worked in north Collin County for one year, currently be living in substandard housing and willing to contribute sweat equity to help build their home and others.

  • #2
    CHU's are quite liveable

    https://shippingcontainerhomefloorplans.com/

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Linedoggie View Post
      out of curiosity do you know anyone who has lived in one for a few years? no trick questions, serious. no I am not planning on it just a curious old architect.

      Comment


      • #4
        Look at this one from 2009, commanding. more at link
        Self-Contained in Texas


        http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/16/ga...6location.html
        “I don’t like the Hamptons because you hear the same gossip and have the same conversations as in New York,” said Roger Black, 60, squinting into the midday sun at Cinco Camp, his West Texas vacation home made of recycled shipping containers. “The whole reason of a weekend place is to get away.”
        Cinco Camp is 200 miles from the nearest airport, in Midland, Tex., and — thanks to a final stretch of teeth-rattling unpaved road — inaccessible without a four-wheel-drive vehicle. Still, it’s less arduous than getting on the Long Island Expressway on a Friday afternoon, he said, shrugging off the more-than-nine-hour journey from his Manhattan apartment overlooking Gramercy Park.
        Mr. Black, who was the art director at Rolling Stone in the 1970s, and at The New York Times and Newsweek in the 1980s, is now a publications consultant and a partner of Font Bureau Inc., a digital type foundry in Boston. He built the house last year, on the incline of a mesa on his 3,000-acre spread in Brewster County, where shale bluffs and sandy valleys are dotted with sagebrush and spiky yucca, and giant tarantulas languidly cross the heat-radiating roads.
        When he visits, about once a month, he unlatches the double doors on each of the five 8-by-20-foot shipping containers to reveal, from left to right, a living room, a bedroom, another bedroom, a kitchen and dining area and a storage and utility room. The last is filled with hardware to support several satellite Internet connections, so while he’s out of the way he’s never out of touch.

        eleven pictures of it

        http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/200...pgtype=article

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by commanding View Post

          out of curiosity do you know anyone who has lived in one for a few years? no trick questions, serious. no I am not planning on it just a curious old architect.
          Lived, no.

          But I have seen a few "houses" made out of them. Two for the base and one on top. It provides a very decent habitable surface, though it obviously needs to be insulated.

          Comment


          • #6
            This seems like an awesome use of available materials for a good purpose. I'm supportive of anything which allows families access to long term housing and planting their roots in their communities. I know here in AZ the shipping container/tiny house thing has been used and marketed mainly to downtown hipsters for ridiculous prices rather than folks in need.

            Comment


            • #7
              Me and a work buddy of mine were discussing this and how we plan to retire by buying empty plots of land in Texas and transporting old cargo containers there to get refurbished and insulated.

              Also I remember some news article was mentioning how some states are solving the problem of homeless folks freezing to death by providing them these domelike structures that you can setup in 20 minutes.

              Comment


              • #8
                Yurts for the homeless, I remember that from some years back

                edit: don't know what the outcome was

                found this

                http://www.portablebuildingstore.com...-the-homeless/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by HisRoyalHighness View Post
                  Me and a work buddy of mine were discussing this and how we plan to retire by buying empty plots of land in Texas and transporting old cargo containers there to get refurbished and insulated.

                  Also I remember some news article was mentioning how some states are solving the problem of homeless folks freezing to death by providing them these domelike structures that you can setup in 20 minutes.
                  good luck!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I've stayed in a sea can quite a few times, overseas.

                    Also bombed quite a few on my FAC (JTAC) course. In Kansas they have an excellent range with little villages full of them

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by commanding View Post

                      good luck!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
                      Thanks, it won’t be for quite a while, but I’m dead set on Texas being where I spend my twilight years.

                      Plus someone needs to shoot all those razorbacks causing billions of $ in damage.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by HisRoyalHighness View Post

                        Thanks, it won’t be for quite a while, but I’m dead set on Texas being where I spend my twilight years.

                        Plus someone needs to shoot all those razorbacks causing billions of $ in damage.
                        HisRoyalHighness the cheapest land per acre in Texas I have seen is the semi arid desert near the big bend area right up close to the Mexican border, if one can put up with 1. the desert, 2. the illegal immigants and drug dealers coming from Mexico and 3. possibly no electricity much less water and/or sewage utilities in the desert. (no trees at all)

                        We looked in 360 degrees of DFW for hunting land with a small cabin, and looked from about Abliene to the west to Texarkana on the east and down to near Menard and Junction area, up north to near McAllester Oklahoma. We found a well wooded and wild place of 1/8 section in Coal County Oklahoma that would fit out budget and bought it around 2013 or so. small metal cabin with structural steel frame up off the ground by 24" on steel columns, has electricity but no water or sewer. So we have a refrigerator and microwave, TV and window air conditioner, but no running water, so we haul it up therein 6 gallon jugs. The mtl cabin is only about 20'x24' and we have a cast iron wood burn stove for heat.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I have an Aunt and Uncle who moved to West Texas from the area where I live, maybe in the 1950's. They bought up land cheap, moved a house to the land they bought, fixed it up, and kept on buying land. They hauled water most of their lives! But it made a living for them and their kids. Now their kids lease land out for hunting. You have to have a lot of land to run cattle out there, which they have done, but I think can make more money leasing it for hunting.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Cowboy's daughter View Post
                            I have an Aunt and Uncle who moved to West Texas from the area where I live, maybe in the 1950's. They bought up land cheap, moved a house to the land they bought, fixed it up, and kept on buying land. They hauled water most of their lives! But it made a living for them and their kids. Now their kids lease land out for hunting. You have to have a lot of land to run cattle out there, which they have done, but I think can make more money leasing it for hunting.
                            CD, I have had friends and family who suggested I lease out hunting on our land, but I believe I will not do it......in my lifetime....as that causes a lot of issues, any hunters would want to use the cabin, nope. .....and they would leave trash and human waste, and 4 wheel tracks all over which would accidently run over the kill our land turtles which now we have a good crop of. When I was going up there every month, I would take a tow sack and pick up trash from along the roads, beer cans bottles, broken glass etc along the road bisecting our land in the bar ditches. I even bought wild flower seed and spread it in the bar ditch areas along the roads to get wild flowers going, and put up around 40 no trespass metal signs, and really cleaned up the roadways.

                            the wooded areas (most of the land) is really virgin type cross timber looking oak, walnuts, etc. Really pre-1492 looking woodland with native animals, sandstone, birds and native creekbeds. Just exactly what I wanted, scores of deer, wild turkey, bobcats, owls, woodpeckers, fireflys,etc. So I won't lease mine.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by commanding View Post

                              CD, I have had friends and family who suggested I lease out hunting on our land, but I believe I will not do it......in my lifetime....as that causes a lot of issues, any hunters would want to use the cabin, nope. .....and they would leave trash and human waste, and 4 wheel tracks all over which would accidently run over the kill our land turtles which now we have a good crop of. When I was going up there every month, I would take a tow sack and pick up trash from along the roads, beer cans bottles, broken glass etc along the road bisecting our land in the bar ditches. I even bought wild flower seed and spread it in the bar ditch areas along the roads to get wild flowers going, and put up around 40 no trespass metal signs, and really cleaned up the roadways.

                              the wooded areas (most of the land) is really virgin type cross timber looking oak, walnuts, etc. Really pre-1492 looking woodland with native animals, sandstone, birds and native creekbeds. Just exactly what I wanted, scores of deer, wild turkey, bobcats, owls, woodpeckers, fireflys,etc. So I won't lease mine.
                              I can see why you wouldn't want to lease it, commanding. I think tho. my Uncle, and cousins fixed up cabins for hunters to stay in. Where they allow hunting is probably not anywhere near where they live.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X