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Narcoterrorism and the KKK Model: Latin America’s ‘Gangster Warlords’

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  • Two cyclists on round-the-world trip feared murdered in Mexico

    http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2018/0...ip-feared.html

    The pair, from Poland and Germany, were found dead in a ravine and investigators now believed they were robbed and killed.

    Two European cyclists who were found dead at the bottom of a ravine in southern Mexico were murdered, investigators have said, discarding their earlier theory that the men plunged off a cliff.

    The cyclists – Holger Hagenbusch of Germany and Krzysztof Chmielewski of Poland – had been travelling the world by bicycle.

    But after being reported missing by relatives, they were found dead at the foot of a sheer rock face in the Mexican state of Chiapas.

    Investigators initially said the pair appeared to have lost control on a winding mountain road.

    However, after a group of fellow cyclists questioned that version of events, a special prosecutor newly appointed to take over the case said the cyclists had in fact been murdered.

    “It may have been an assault, because our investigations up to now indicate this was an intentional homicide,” special prosecutor Luis Alberto Sanchez told journalists.

    The motive appears to have been robbery, he said. Chmielewski sustained a head injury that may be a gunshot wound, he added.



    Thieves derail and rob freight train in Veracruz

    http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2018/0...-veracruz.html

    Puebla, Mexico (May 08, 2018) - Train robbers caused the derailment of a train when it rounded near the Municipality of Acultzingo, Veracruz.

    During the early morning of this Tuesday, it was reported that the Ferrosur locomotive with machine number 4713 was purposely derailed near Puebla.

    It was reported that a group of train robbers removed parts of the railway to cause the derailment.

    Subsequently, the thieves made off with the cargo that the hopper cars were carrying.

    The incident was reported to the Public Security corporations, and elements of the Federal Police (PF) arrived to the site to provide security and guard the area.

    The area remains under surveillance waiting for the Ferrosu staff to begin work on getting the four hopper cars that were tipped over back in order.

    So far the authorities do not report people injured or detained.

    Comment


    • Not Safe For Work!
      Dead body in the road, but not as bad as it could be.
      I can't imagine living somewhere and seeing this when I drive down the road.

      Monday, May 21, 2018

      Drive through of the aftermath of the battle in Yecora, Sonora (Video)

      http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2018/0...battle-in.html

      Comment


      • Tamaulipas Congress discusses approving citizens to carry firearms, in the face of rampant insecurity

        Translated by Otis B Fly-Wheel for Borderland Beat from a Milenio article

        Subject Matter: Concealed and non concealed carrying of arms by civilians in Tamaulipas

        Otis: This could be a momentous decision for the people of Tamaulipas in cities such as Reynosa and Rio Bravo, who live in fear of constant running gun battles between antagonistic narcos, extortion and kidnapping. The current laws allow Mexican citizens under the constitution to keep firearms up to .38 calibre in their homes. This temporary amendment, if made, will allow them to carry arms in the street to defend their business from extortion, themselves from being kidnapped, and to assist the Police engaged in confrontations with criminals, will certainly be received with fear, but from the criminals not the ordinary citizens


        http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2018/0...approving.html

        Reporter: Antonio Hernandez
        In the face of insecurity, opinion is divided in the Tamaulipas congress to arm men and women in the style of the old west to defend themselves from aggression, robbery or kidnapping in Tamaulipas.

        The Deputy Nohemi Estrella Leal, president of the Commission for Transparency and Access to Public information, said she will insist on discussing an initiative so that civilians can repel attacks or act in defense of victims of crime, until the Police can arrive.

        What is involved is that people will be able to carry weapons with permission, can only intervene when they see a crime in progress or when they are prey to a crime and only until the Police arrive.

        In addition, it is also a question of having your handgun loaded, "cocked and locked", because all those carrying will help to maintain security as auxiliary police officers.




        For his part, Alejandro Etienne, president of the Instructor Commission of the Congress of Tamaulipas, said that in Mexico we have had the problem of yesteryear, because people were armed, and a disarmament program was made.

        "Today conditions make this issue come back, precisely because of the inability we have had as governments of one or the other party to solve the problem of insecurity," he explained. To arm people seems to me that it is not the answer, the answer should come from the authority, from people having no need to go armed or seek to walk armed, but to solve thoroughly the problem of security.

        So that is not even an option that people are looking for the use of weapons, so we have to be more effective in combating insecurity. And he concluded, there is the possibility of going armed, but it should be seen within the normative framework.

        Comment


        • There's two sides to this. Mexico has seen what happens when self-defense groups try to fight back; so have Afghanistan, Iraq and many other places. Folks should be enabled to defend themselves against individual criminals, but whenever organized crime's involved the sober truth is fighting back is not advisable at all. A civil armed response is only ever going to be met with severed heads and mutilated bodies hanging from overpasses and utility poles.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by muck View Post
            There's two sides to this. Mexico has seen what happens when self-defense groups try to fight back; so have Afghanistan, Iraq and many other places. Folks should be enabled to defend themselves against individual criminals, but whenever organized crime's involved the sober truth is fighting back is not advisable at all. A civil armed response is only ever going to be met with severed heads and mutilated bodies hanging from overpasses and utility poles.
            The citizens are definitely out-gunned, and the cartels are beasts.

            Comment


            • US Couple and their Dog Murdered in BOLA, Baja Ca

              http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2018/0...d-in.html#more

              The bad news is true. Ray Ball and Jo Butler were murdered in their home at the south end of town, Bahia de Los Angeles, while trying to stop the theft of their fishing boat in the middle of the night. Their bodies were found inside their home, along with that of their pet dog, but a baseball bat was found outside the house indicating the couple was marched back into the house and murdered.

              This does not bode well for the town. Violence against Americans has been escalating in the last few years with little or no response from authorities. The town elders and governing officials must do something quickly to solve this crime or dire consequences will follow.

              There is also no information yet on the type of boat. Reports state that it got stuck in the sand and the thieves made a run for it into the desert after murdering the couple and being unable to launch the boat. Speculation is that the 2 assailants took off in two cars and were not from the small village at Bahia de Los Angeles, although it is possible that a lookout is.

              Comment


              • THE "TALIBAN" IN MEXICO, not really, just cutting off heads, or oh gee why would anybody want A WALL!!

                Cartel del Golfo member interrogated and killed by Los Talibanes

                Posted by Otis B Fly-Wheel for Borderland Beat from a youtube video

                WARNING STRONG BLOODY VIOLENCE AT THE END OF THIS INTERROGATION VIDEO

                BORDERLAND BEAT, LINK NOT POSTED.

                NOT SAFE FOR WORK!!

                What police are supporting you?
                State and Municipal
                The municipal Police, where are they supporting you?
                In Luis Moya, Padrino support here
                Whats the name of he who provides support?
                They call him El Bronco
                El Bronco is a normal policeman?
                Normal police chief
                Does he work behind the scenes passing you information?
                Yes
                The State Police, who supports you?
                A commander they call El Gordo
                Commander Gordo?
                Yes
                This guy, how many cloned patrols does he have?
                Two
                Where do they eat?
                There at the side of Cosio in a house that they have

                Comments
                This is on the Zacatecas State, enjoying new governor.
                The talibans were the zetas that seceded with Ivan "El tal iván" Velasquez Caballero for lack of performance in the PAY DEPARTMENT, because Las Treviñas needed to feed their Ranchos and race horses...
                El Talisman was arrested in San Luis Potosi where he felt safer after the zeta took a bobcat to his house he had stolen in Fresnillo by just ordering the owners to get thefackoutofthere, by the way the murdering has gone on unabated all over the state, but it does not get reported, weeks ago the brother of the new city mayor Torres got murdered "for a parking spot, and nothing else"

                Reply
                AnonymousJune 5, 2018 at 6:48 AM
                Was he shot at the end?

                Otis B Fly-WheelJune 5, 2018 at 7:10 AM
                No, they cut his head off

                AnonymousJune 5, 2018 at 7:01 AM
                Wow this interview is out in the open, raw, for those of you, that think the municipal and state Police are clean. Your in for a big surprise, they are currupted and work with the local cartel. Can't trust no one, you secretly have to kill cartel members, with trusted partners in Autodefensas.

                Comment


                • "La Garra", The bloodthirsty CJNG leader that little is reported about

                  http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2018/0...that.html#more



                  The Cartel Jalisco New Generation is the youngest transnational criminal organization, but also the most powerful in Mexico and the United States, according to DEA.

                  Therefore, the leaders of this organization automatically become the “most wanted” criminals. Nemesio Oseguera Cervantes AKA El Mencho, is the supreme leader and therefore the number one public enemy for Mexican and US Authorities.

                  However, working for him, is a drug trafficker of whom little has been spoken of and who represents a key role in CJNG.
                  Jose Luis Mendoza Cardenas AKA La Garra appears in "The National Drug Threat Evaluation" of DEA.

                  The US Authorities place La Garra in the trio of leaders of the CJNG, along with El Mencho and Abigael Gonzalez Valencia AKA El Cuini, detained on March 2, 2015 in Puerto Vallerta.

                  Unlike Oseguera Cervantes and González Valencia, who has widely investigated, Mendoza Cárdenas seems a drug trafficker working in the shadows. From what little is known about him is that he was arrested in 2008, before CJNG was known as Cartel Jalisco New Generation.

                  He was arrested on August 1, 2008, along with six subjects, for the atrocious murder of a family in Ciudad Guzmán, on July 25 of that year. The multihomicide shook all of Jalisco. Of the six members of the family who were murdered, three were minors: a 17-year-old boy, as well as two girls of eight and seven years old.

                  In addition, the property had belonged to Alberto Cárdenas Jiménez, at that time Secretary of Agriculture and Livestock, former governor of Jalisco.

                  Cárdenas Jiménez had sold the property two months and a half before the crime to the family in his words, "we were united by an old friendship". He added, in addition, that previously property buyers had been victims of kidnapping years ago so they decided to change their address.

                  Less than a month after his arrest, on August 30, 2008, "La Garra" was released. This release without apparent explanation occurred during the governorship of the PAN Emilio González Márquez, who was also accused of having released "El Mencho" in August 2012 after having been arrested two hours earlier by elements of the Federal Police.

                  Less than ten years after his brief arrest, Mendoza Cárdenas is at the top of the criminal world. Everything indicates that "La Garra" is not found in Mexico, but in the US, serving as the main operator of the CJNG in that country.

                  According to the DEA, the CJNG stronghold in the United States is California, from where Mendoza Cárdenas would operate. The main drug trafficked into the US is methamphetamine, an addictive substance that they became pioneers since they worked with the Sinaloa Cartel under the orders of Ignacio "Nacho" Coronel, murdered in 2010.

                  Although they also distribute, to a lesser extent, cocaine, heroin and marijuana. The DEA details that the drug comes from Guadalajara, entering the United States through Tijuana, Ciudad Juárez and Nuevo Laredo.

                  Los Angeles, New York and Atlanta are the main distribution centers of the CJNG. In Mexican territory, according to the Attorney General's Office (PGR), the CJNG operates in eight states of the country: Jalisco, Colima, Michoacán, Guanajuato, Nayarit, Guerrero, Morelos and Veracruz.

                  Thus, the cartel with the most presence in Mexico, even greater than the Sinaloa Cartel, which has been reduced by criminal coups and currently operates, according to official data, in six of the country's entities.

                  Comment


                  • Tamaulipas government and 7 Agencies of the United States Collaborate to capture criminal leaders of Los Zetas, Cdg and CdN

                    http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2018/0...encies-of.html

                    The government of Tamaulipas announced Thursday a program of collaboration with 7 United States Federal Agencies, to facilitate the detention of leaders of Los Zetas, the Cartel del Golfo and other criminal groups that operate on the frontier with Texas.

                    This program of collaboration is without precedent, " the bi-national force is the largest assembled against these criminal groups", said the state government.

                    The program began to be put together in early 2017 with the Tamaulipas Attorney Generals Office, while the US government agencies of The Office of Customs and Border Protection, the Department for National Security, the State Department, the Drug Enforcement Agency and the Immigration and Citizenship Services.

                    Through this program, government agencies will share information and citizens of both countries will be able to make anonymous reports via telephone or whatsapp to USA as well as Mexican numbers.
                    Among the first objectives of the operation are, Juan Gerardo Trevino Chavez, El Huevo, designated as the leader of Los Zetas by the DEA and Alfredo Cardenas Martinez, El Contador, leader of the Cartel del Golfo, according to the same agency.

                    The other main objectives are: Luis Miguel Mercado Gonzalez, El Flaco Sierra; Petronilo Moreno Flores, El Panillo; Luis Alberto Blanco Flores, El Pelochas; Juan Miguel Lizardi Castro, Miguelito; Andres Martinez Granados, El Pause; Agustin Ordorica Lopez and Luis Bravo Bautista Ramirez.

                    (Otis: given the complicity by Tamaulipas authorities with the cartels, I don't think this cooperation will lead to any of the above being arrested, unless the USA agencies are allowed onto Mexican soil to carry out arrests without any prior notice to Mexican local authorities. If they do allow it, I can see them all leaving the State immediately to avoid arrest.)

                    Comment


                    • Chinese linked to CJNG arrested in CdMx
                      http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2018/0...d-in-cdmx.html
                      Reporter: Ruben Mosso
                      Elements of the Army and the PGR captured 10 persons allegedly linked to the Cartel Jalisco Nueva Generacion and other criminal organizations, who are dedicated to money laundering of said criminal groups in Mexico City.

                      At the moment of their capture they were found with $10,510,000.00, the equivalent of 206,000,000.00 Mexican Pesos. Israel Lira Salas, functionary of SEIDO, mentioned that 6 of the detained were of Chinese origin and the rest were Mexican.

                      The detention, explained the functionary, derived from search warrants that were issued on the 26th and 28th of May for several houses in Mexico City, where personnel from the Army and SEIDO captured the 10 persons.
                      Also, they confiscated 6 estates, a 9mm firearm, 10 vehicles, of which 5 contained compartments for hiding objects, as well as various financial documents. The state prosecutor said that the detained were presented before a Judge from the capital city, who heard charges of organized crime with the proceeds of illicit origin, as well as violation of the Federal law of firearms and explosives.

                      The Judge gave four weeks to the PGR to complete the investigation, the suspects were imprisoned in the Relusorio Preventativo Norte in City of Mexico. Participating in the investigation will be the Investigative Unit of Financial Intelligence and the Secretary of Housing and the Federal Police.

                      AnonymousJune 8, 2018 at 3:27 AM
                      I take it they were part of a chemical import network.

                      Otis B Fly-WheelJune 8, 2018 at 3:42 AM
                      The article doesn't mention that, and all the main news outlets are carrying this story. It just mentions money laundering, but given previous Chinese involvement in precursor chemical supply, that would be an educated guess.

                      Comment


                      • It'll be Fentanyl.

                        Comment


                        • Illicit Opioids — Not Prescription Meds — Are Fueling America’s Epidemic

                          http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2018/0...tion-meds.html

                          The opioid problem now isn't so much about doctors and legitimate prescriptions. It's about illegal drugs entering through our border with Mexico.
                          Most fentanyl comes from Sinaloa Cartel
                          In 2014, 8 pounds of fentanyl from Mexico was seized by US border agents in the Southwest; in 2015, 200 pounds of fentanyl was seized.
                          From October 2016 to August 2017, about 950 pounds of fentanyl was seized nationwide — and more than half of it (550 pounds) was seized at the San Diego and Tucson field offices on the Mexico border.
                          My sheriff office led the largest drug bust ($2 billion) in Arizona history against Mexico’s Sinaloa Cartel.
                          Most people are unaware of the routes, the market, the quantities, the potencies, the purity and the lethality of these counterfeit drugs – but those facts are staggering.
                          The Drug Enforcement Agency reports that:
                          Fentanyl can be 50 times as potent as heroin.
                          Even the smallest amount – about 2 milligrams, or about 4 grains of salt – is deadly.
                          Its chemical cousin, carfentanil, is even more deadly — just a single grain can kill.
                          Domestic prescriptions aren't the problem
                          Congress has looked at doctors and prescription abuse and addressed issues there, but illegal sourcing has been ignored. According to the U.S. Health and Human Services, every day 116 people die from opioid-related drug overdoses. In 2016, 42,249 people died from opioid overdoses — but a majority of those were caused by illegal synthetic opioids like fentanyl.
                          ,,,
                          The problem now is not doctors and legitimate prescriptions. It is criminals and illegal drugs. These illegal drugs are being trafficked into the U.S. by criminal smugglers primarily from Mexico and China. Mexico’s Sinaloa Cartel, the criminal enterprise once led by Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán, is a driving force in the surge in fentanyl crossing the border.

                          Currently, 80 percent of the illegal fentanyl seized by the DEA has been traced to Mexico’s Sinaloa Cartel. Illegal opioids are being imported into our country through and from Mexico on a daily basis. These are being sourced by Chinese factories and Mexican cartels.
                          These highly addictive and very potent synthetic opioids now kill Americans every day, and the death toll keeps rising.

                          It is time for congressional hearings on this aspect of the opioid crises. It’s not enough to look at domestic production, physician prescription practices and pharmacy record keeping. We need to address the real problem at the source — our open border and the illegally manufactured and criminally trafficked drugs that cross it.

                          Our nation needs congressional hearings on how easily illegal fentanyl from Mexico and China is slipping across our borders and harming Americans. I urge the House and Senate to convene hearings and flesh out the facts here.

                          Comment


                          • A photographer hung out with vigilantes in Mexico's most dangerous state. Here's what she saw.

                            http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2018/0...igilantes.html

                            News of violence and corruption emanating from Mexico is nothing new. And there is possibly nowhere more violent and corrupt than the state of Guerrero. Not only are there rival drug gangs vying over territory used to make heroin, but police are often seen as corrupt, too. According to Reuters, Police were accused of participating in the disappearance of 43 teachers college students in Guerrero in 2014. Indeed, violence and corruption are so bad that, according to Reuters, “it is not uncommon for state, federal and military forces to replace local security forces suspected of corruption and ties to Mexico’s powerful gangs.”


                            Upset with all of this violence and corruption, some people in Guerrero have banded together to form “citizen police” groups to protect their communities. Mark Stevenson of the Associated Press describes these groups as being “vigilante outfits with no allegiance — and often outright hostility — to elected authorities. They are grass-roots attempts by locals to rein in lawlessness in some of the areas most racked by killings, kidnappings, extortion and other malfeasance.” Not surprisingly, the job can be dangerous, even fatal, but not only for the vigilantes; ordinary civilians have also been killed. For example, Stevenson notes, “Alexis Estrada Asencio, a 17-year-old bull-riding enthusiast, and five other citizens were killed in La Concepcion on Jan. 7 in a confused gunfight between vigilante forces and other townsfolk over a dispute of a proposed hydroelectric dam near Acapulco.”

                            Associated Press photographer Rebecca Blackwell went to Guerrero to document how some of these vigilante groups operate. Here’s what she encountered:

                            photos on link..

                            Comment


                            • ONC predicts 2018 will be another year of failed security, worst in 20 years
                              http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2018/0...ther-year.html

                              Crimes related to gender violence in Mexico, in the first four months of 2018, were increasing by 40.8 percent, on average, according to official figures. According to analysts consulted by Sin Embargo, the lack of reporting, the under-reporting of violence, the weakness of institutions and the lack of prevention, are some factors that do not allow adequate attention to violence that affect, at least, 30.7 millions of women.

                              Every hour, in our country, five crimes of gender violence were committed, according to figures from the Executive Secretariat of the National Public Security System (SESNSP). While last January there were 2 thousand 656 investigation files for some type of crime, in April, 3 thousand 739 were registered.

                              Mexico City (Sin Embargo) - The National Citizen Observatory (ONC) predicted that 2018 will be even more violent than the previous year, as it is expected that the incidence of homicides and femicides will increase by 6.88 percent over the previous year.

                              "Mexico is going through one of the worst crises of violence in the last 20 years. Not only we can not move forward but we are still lost in a route that makes us think that things are not going to improve," said Francisco Rivas, Director of the National Observatory.
                              ...
                              We do not have an accurate approach to combat insecurity. Many candidates talk about technology or implementation of institutions, but they never tell us in reality what is the way to carry out 👉🏼

                              ...

                              The Observatory urged the Mexican State to change its security policy and attack the finances of criminals with modifications to the Law of Extinction of Dominion.

                              "We need to change [in terms of security] from a reactive approach, we need operative actions," he said.

                              He added: "We need to weaken the financial structure of criminals. The authority needs more strength to dismantle the financial structure."

                              Comment


                              • link NSFW, photo of dead body

                                To me this is just crazy!

                                Sunday, April 15, 2018
                                43 Student attack in Iguala was guided from Chicago

                                http://www.borderlandbeat.com/2018/0...guided_15.html

                                Chivis Note; Intriguing events in the case of the Iguala deadly attack and disappearance of 43, (one murdered student left the scene had his face skinned and eyes gouged, therefore there were 44 altogether) . It was during a drug trafficking bust, and investigation of GU targets in Chicago, that the information was gleaned from Blackberries used by suspects and confidential informants. Revealed in those transcripts were conversations with GU in Chicago and GU in Mexico from and about the Iguala massacre on September 26th and subsequent days. Mexico GU called to seek guidance regarding how to proceed.

                                read about the bust by using this link https://www.justice.gov/usao-ndil/pr...uerrero-unidos

                                The entire massacre was from bad information. GU was told Los Rojos were the targets. And they worried that the mess would cause them the business.

                                The “El Gil” mentioned in the Reforma article, is Gildardo López Astudillo, 'Gil'

                                According to PGR investigations, on September 27 'El Gil' sent a text message to the leader of Guerreros Unidos, Casarrubias Salgado Sidronio, which read: "Los hicimos polvo y los echamos al agua, nunca los van a encontrar" "They were turn to dust and thrown to the river they never gonna find them." 'Gil' is imprisoned in the maximum security prison of Altiplano.

                                “Silver” Pablo Cuevas is now a protected witness and is scheduled to be sentenced in Illinois on May 28th. Since he is a PW, it would seem like a good time to get information that would lead to the conclusion of the case of the missing normalistas (students) and the answers to outstanding questions. It’s probably the best hope.
                                ****

                                43 Student attack in Iguala was guided from Chicago

                                Comment

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