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  • Suez: The Forgotten Invasion by Robert Jackson - First published in 1996.

    It's not a thick book, 136 pages in total. And about half is devoted to the political machinations around organising the invasion. The rest is about how the Israeli, French and British units carried it out and the aftermath/repercussions.

    Apart from that, the above mentioned Small Wars in Far Away Places devotes a chapter to Suez which was very entertaining.

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    • Originally posted by TheKiwi View Post
      Suez: The Forgotten Invasion by Robert Jackson - First published in 1996.

      It's not a thick book, 136 pages in total. And about half is devoted to the political machinations around organising the invasion. The rest is about how the Israeli, French and British units carried it out and the aftermath/repercussions.

      Apart from that, the above mentioned Small Wars in Far Away Places devotes a chapter to Suez which was very entertaining.
      Cheers Kiwi! I'm looking into it as we speak.

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      • Congo: The Epic History of a People - David Van Reybrouck

        1/4 of the way though - very readable, hard to put down and perceptive - written by a Belgian historian whose travelled to the Congo many times and got to know the locals.

        Highly recommended.

        For the Aussie people on the forum, Paul Ham's Passchendaele just arrived in the post - can't wait to read it.

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        • I'm rereading The Junior Officers Reading Club by Patrick Hennesey. It's another one of these "I went to somewhere sandy and got shot at" memoirs, but this one is written by a guy who studied English at Oxford so he can actually construct a sentence. It covers his time at Sandhurst, which is a nice insight, along with combat tours of Afghanistan and Iraq. Some rather excellent scenes, including a big song and dance being made about the first black officer in the regiment, someone offering him a cigarette while blazing away from the hip in a firefight and trying to form a book club to stave off the endless boredom when not being shot at. I'd definitely recommend it.

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          • http://www.memoriesofadifferentworld.uk/

            My parents got me a signed copy of this for Christmas, I'm excited to read it.

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            • 3 books arrived yesterday...

              October Fury by Peter Huchthausen - about the deployment of Soviet submarines during the Cuban Missile Crisis (and the recent revelation they were armed with nuclear torpedos). 2 chapters in, well researched and very readable - reads more like a story - recommended if you like that sort of thing.

              EDIT - Huchthausen was an officer aboard one of the US destroyers that brought a Foxtrot SSK to the surface. With a few pages to go, it's an excellent read.

              Gangs of New York - Herbert Asbury - the book that inspired the great movie - can't wait to read it!

              Shadow Cold War, the Sino-Soviet Competition for the Third Word - Jeremy Friedman - looks meaty and detailed.

              Cheers!
              Last edited by Chauncey; 17-01-2017, 12:10 AM.

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              • A Home on the Rolling Main: A Naval Memoir 1940–1946: excelent reading, plenty of british humor and lots of information about the life on destroyers.

                Down to the Sea: Typhoon Cobra an the fate of TF 38s destroyers, full of personnal accounts.


                The Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors: Battle of Samar through the eyes of US destroyers sailors.

                On a "WWII destroyers memoirs" phase now.

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                • Soviet Way of War, book-sized study of the Kremlin’s ground forces. Available online (draft).
                  Last edited by Jaguar; 01-02-2017, 12:01 PM.

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                  • The Profession of Violence - The Rise and Fall of the Kray Twins by John Pearson

                    Not military history - but an account of the gangster twins of 1960s London. It inspired the great movie, Legend.

                    An interesting read - obviously goes into more detail than the movie. Recommended if you like that sort of thing.

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                    • Just started "Homage to Catalonia" by Orwell. Should be interesting, I'll let you know how it turns out.

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                      • CAVALRY TACTICS: OR, REGULATIONS FOR THE instruction, Formations, and Movements OF THE CAVALRY OF THE ARMY AND VOLUNTEERS OF THE UNITED STATES ... . By PHILIP ST. GEO. COOKE, BRIG. GEN. U. S. ARMY.

                        ebook, I'll need a dictionary of 19th century cavalry terms to understand it.

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                        • Books about portuguese Colonial War in english, written by US Navy officer John P. Cann, he did a service tour in NATO Command near Lisbon in the 1980s and become interest about this war, very unknown to people outside of Portugal because there is very few publications in other languages.

                          Counterinsurgency in Africa: The Portuguese Way of War 1961-74



                          Brown Waters of Africa: Portuguese Riverine Warfare 1961-1974



                          Flight Plan Africa: Portuguese Airpower in Counterinsurgency, 1961-1974



                          The Paras: Portugal’s First Elite Force in Africa, 1961-1974



                          The Fuzileiros: Portuguese Marines in Africa, 1961–1974



                          Portuguese Commandos: Feared Insurgent Hunters, 1961-1974



                          The Flechas: Insurgent Hunting in Eastern Angola, 1965–1974

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                          • The First Day On The Somme - Martin Middlebrook

                            A rather excellent summary of the first day with a lovely focus on the pals battalions involved. The tales of their formation would be amusing if it weren't so serious. People turning up on day one of their training and being promoted to NCO on account of having previously had responsibility in civilian life.

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                            • One Hundred Days - The Memoirs of Sandy Woodward

                              An account by the Royal Navy's commander during the Falklands War. Sadly, he died in 2013 - but this is an incredible recount of the war from the British perspective. It's especially interesting because he was not the 'typical toff' British officer and he very much had the 'common touch'; you really get an insight into the 'pressure' and loneliness of command.

                              Highly recommended!

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