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Should the ashes of Japanese war criminals in Singapore cemetery be removed?

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  • Should the ashes of Japanese war criminals in Singapore cemetery be removed?

    In a tranquil neighbourhood near Hougang lies a 126-year-old cemetery with a grim past etched on a granite pillar. Measuring less than a metre in height, the pillar marks the final resting place of 135 Japanese war criminals.
    https://sg.news.yahoo.com/comment-as...041516752.html

  • #2
    Will give them a quote on development cost plus cement and rebar over the top.

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    • #3
      so reading the first sentence....I at first though the war crimes were older than WW2, but evidently their? war crimes were in the Jap. invasion of China, so the crimes were ABOUT 75 to 80 years ago.

      Sounds like to me someone back then or early post war decided their ashes could be buried there.....in China. So why not leave them there? If the Chinese were okay with it when the remains were originally placed there.....I can see the argument for leaving them to rest in peace. Just my 2 cents. not the hill I want to die on.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by commanding View Post

        so reading the first sentence....I at first though the war crimes were older than WW2, but evidently their? war crimes were in the Jap. invasion of China, so the crimes were ABOUT 75 to 80 years ago.

        Sounds like to me someone back then or early post war decided their ashes could be buried there.....in China. So why not leave them there? If the Chinese were okay with it when the remains were originally placed there.....I can see the argument for leaving them to rest in peace. Just my 2 cents. not the hill I want to die on.

        Not China, but Malaysia, it was a similar British colony to Hong Kong. From Wiki -
        During the Second World War, the Imperial Japanese Army invaded British Malaya, culminating in the Battle of Singapore. When the British force of 60,000 troops surrendered on 15 February 1942, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill called the defeat "the worst disaster and largest capitulation in British history.[44] British losses during the fighting for Singapore were heavy, with a total of nearly 85,000 personnel captured, in addition to losses during the earlier fighting in Malaya.[45] About 5,000 were killed or wounded,[46] of which Australians made up the majority.[47] Japanese casualties during the fighting in Singapore amounted to 1,714 killed and 3,378 wounded. [45][Note 1]. The occupation was to become a major turning point in the histories of several nations, including those of Japan, Britain, and the then-colonial state of Singapore. Japanese newspapers triumphantly declared the victory as deciding the general situation of the war.[48] Singapore was renamed Syonan-to (昭南島 Shōnan-tō), meaning "Light of the South".[49][50] Between 5,000 and 25,000 ethnic Chinese people were killed in the subsequent Sook Ching massacre.[51]
        British forces had planned to liberate Singapore in 1945; however, the war ended before these operations could be carried out. It was subsequently re-occupied by British, Indian and Australian forces following the Japanese surrender in September.[52] Meanwhile, Tomoyuki Yamashita was tried by a US military commission for war crimes, but not for crimes committed by his troops in Malaya or Singapore. He was convicted and hanged in the Philippines on 23 February 1946.[53]

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        • #5
          For the war criminals, flush the ashes down the toilet. For the others, let them go home.

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          • #6
            I don't think the modern generations fully get how bad some of the Japanese were. The concept of Bushido by western standards was barbaric. Hence when the Japanese captured troops they often saw them as worse than rubbish as it was dishonorable to surrender.

            I recently visited Papua New Guinea, and even today the Japanese are none too popular amongts the locals. On Kiriwina Island, there is a cave which is a bit of tourist attraction now (i forgot to visit it, instead i visited the old Number 1 aerodrome), where the skulls of locals murdered by the Japanese are now kept.

            At Milne Bay we spoke with a lady who lost at least one family member, murdered by the Japanese when they landed there in retaliation for one of her family members helping the Australians.

            The crap that went on in and around Malaya, i.e. the Burma Thai Railway, and the treatment and murders there are also horrible. I could go on all day.

            Funnily enough I walked a park this morning known as ANZAC Park where many many plaques are for those who died during, and after they returned from the war. I will post some photos i look later, but it really hit home how many returned, and didn't return from the wark, including those who died on the Sandakan death march. This was particularly bad as only 6 of of some 2,000 prisoners survived the march, only because they ran off into the bush. The Japanese wanted rid of them so they kept marching them across country, malnourished, until they fell. They then left them to die or killed them on the spot.

            My grandfather didn't like the Japanese, and i met a few ex POWs in my lifetime who seemed ok, but the war left them screwed up in private.

            In short, leave them there.

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            • #7
              WW11 is over, grave sites are gravesites, leave it alone

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              • #8
                Yes, seriously, US military (meaning marines, soldiers) captured Japanese troops, questioned them, then either shot them or cut their throats. Some were spared.
                My point is US actions to captured were war crimes,.....not as bad as the empire of japan,....but war crimes. None the less.

                it is over, done, both sides were brutal.....war is that way. (My father in law told me "we worked them" meaning they put Jap. POWs to work at labor on Saipan.) As i asked him about POWs.

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                • #9
                  Forgiven but not forgotten, I guess it is better to leave there as it is.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by commanding View Post
                    Yes, seriously, US military (meaning marines, soldiers) captured Japanese troops, questioned them, then either shot them or cut their throats. Some were spared.
                    My point is US actions to captured were war crimes,.....not as bad as the empire of japan,....but war crimes. None the less.

                    it is over, done, both sides were brutal.....war is that way. (My father in law told me "we worked them" meaning they put Jap. POWs to work at labor on Saipan.) As i asked him about POWs.
                    I can't agree more..

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                    • #11
                      How about we stop fucking with history, and let them lie in peace. They’re dead; it’s over.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Spartan10k View Post
                        How about we stop fucking with history, and let them lie in peace. They’re dead; it’s over.
                        Yeah, if nothing else it's a reminder of what happened. A tangible, visual reality of the past that a book or computer screen can't convey.

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                        • #13
                          I have nothing against repatriation of remains. But the problem is after seven decades of deliberate and collective memory loss, the Japanese will likely inter them as heroes upon their return. There should be a clause that they don't hold a state ceremony for the bastards and quietly bury them without honors. The problem is if they do that at Yasukuni it will be hard to avoid goose-stepping re-enactors and right-wing revisionists turning up and making a circus out of it.

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                          • #14
                            Exactly. You cannot control that. What they would do with them ... Anyway they already do at that shrine but most Japanese are content with the results of WW2.

                            I can still remember the hatred of those that served where I grew up, they wouldn't buy anything Japanese their whole life and fear of what would happen to the women and children. They had plans for when they came.. It was going to be all on if they came.
                            It was different from the German theatre. Main thing they were miles away.
                            When one of the echelons was going to the desert they almost didn't board the train. Seriously. Mutiny. Think the PM had to do some phoning. They wanted to stay for the Japanese which made more sense.

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                            • #15
                              commanding , where was that? I know in PNG the Japanese would hide and play dead, then shoot/grenade/bayonet troops as they passed. I think arouind Gona/Buna (i could be wrong) the Allies took to shooting anyone on the battle field to check they were dead to stop that.

                              There is a book i have somewhere which basically points out things allied troops did which was not "good". The intent of the book was not to discrete all troops, but to show the allies were not perfect during WW2.
                              Originally posted by primer View Post
                              Exactly. You cannot control that. What they would do with them ... Anyway they already do at that shrine but most Japanese are content with the results of WW2.

                              I can still remember the hatred of those that served where I grew up, they wouldn't buy anything Japanese their whole life and fear of what would happen to the women and children. They had plans for when they came.. It was going to be all on if they came.
                              A friend at high schools grandfather was a POW under the Japanese. To the day he died he would abuse people driving Japanese cars. My grandfathers face would light up when he spoke of the Beaufighters strafing the japanese. Don't get me wrong, he never enjoyed death, in fact he hated the destruction of life during the war. But he didn't like the Japanese for what they did.

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