Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

This day in Military History

Collapse
This is a sticky topic.
X
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • On August 6, 1945, the American bomber Enola Gay dropped a five-ton atomic bomb over the Japanese city of Hiroshima. A blast equivalent to the power of 15,000 tons of TNT reduced four square miles of the city to ruins and immediately killed 80,000 people. Tens of thousands more died in the following weeks from wounds and radiation poisoning.
    Wikipedia:

    Enola Gay was personally selected by Colonel Paul W. Tibbets, Jr., the commander of the 509th Composite Group, on 9 May 1945, while still on the assembly line. The aircraft was accepted by the United States Army Air Forces(USAAF) on 18 May 1945 and assigned to the 393d Bombardment Squadron, Heavy, 509th Composite Group. Crew B-9, commanded by Captain Robert A. Lewis, took delivery of the bomber and flew it from Omaha to the 509th's base at Wendover Army Air Field, Utah, on 14 June 1945.[5]
    Thirteen days later, the aircraft left Wendover for Guam, where it received a bomb-bay modification, and flew to North Field, Tinian, on 6 July. It was initially given the Victor (squadron-assigned identification) number 12, but on 1 August, was given the circle R tail markings of the 6th Bombardment Group as a security measure and had its Victor number changed to 82 to avoid misidentification with actual 6th Bombardment Group aircraft.[5]
    Wikipedia....

    The bomb's name was Little Boy and it was 10 feet long.

    Little Boy was developed by Lieutenant CommanderFrancis Birch's group of CaptainWilliam S. Parsons's Ordnance (O) Division at the Manhattan Project's Los Alamos Laboratory during World War II. Parsons flew on the Hiroshima mission as weaponeer. The Little Boy was a development of the unsuccessful Thin Man nuclear bomb. Like Thin Man, it was a gun-type fission weapon, but derived its explosive power from the nuclear fission of uranium-235. This was accomplished by shooting a hollow cylinder of enriched uranium (the "bullet") onto a solid cylinder of the same material (the "target") by means of a charge of nitrocellulose propellant powder. It contained 64 kg (141 lb) of enriched uranium, of which less than a kilogram underwent nuclear fission. Its components were fabricated at three different plants so that no one would have a copy of the complete design.
    The bomb likely saved millions of lives, both American and Japanese, and many people alive today are descendants of survivors of lives saved!
    Last edited by commanding; 06-08-2017, 01:30 AM.

    Comment


    • 5 September 1697 -- Battle of Hudson's Bay. French warship commanded by Captain Pierre le Moyne d'Iberville defeats an English squadron, sinking the Hampshire and capturing the Hudson's Bay. This action allowed the French to capture York Factory.

      From the wiki summary: "D'Iberville, his shore party out of reach, elected to give battle. The battle began as a running fight, but after two and a half hours, D'Iberville closed with the English and a brutal broadside-to-broadside engagement took place between Pélican and Hampshire. The English seemed to be gaining the upper hand with blood running from the scuppers of Pélican into the water.[3] Captain Fletcher demanded that D'Iberville surrender, but D'Iberville refused.[4] Fletcher is reported to have raised a glass of wine to toast D'Iberville's bravery when the next broadside from Pélican detonated Hampshire's powder magazine.[5]Hampshire exploded and sank."

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Hudson%27s_Bay

      Comment


      • https://twitter.com/RealTimeWWII/sta...84614019801088



        Comment


        • 7 December 1941.....Pearl Harbor day. May the US sailors, airmen and service women, marines and soldiers KIA on 7 Dec ......Rest in Peace. God received them cloaked in glory for their lives given in service to their nation so that we might life under US law and liberty.
          They were avenged.

          Comment


          • December 8th, 1987... 30 years ago today, the INF treaty was signed between the USSR and the United States:
            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interm..._Forces_Treaty

            It's recently been challenged on and off by both Russia (as the legal heir of the USSR, thus inheriting the USSR-era treaties) and the U.S. - they've been accusing each other of attempting to circumvent said treaty in various ways and occasionally these disputes flare up a bit.

            It's funny and sad at the same time, that back in the day when the USSR was a closed communist superstate behind the iron curtain, at severe odds with the U.S. both ideologically and practically, the two still some-fucking-how managed to conduct diplomacy a lot better than they do now when Russia is a die-hard capitalist, majority Christian democracy (or semi-democracy, at any rate an entirely different place ideologically speaking)

            Comment


            • Originally posted by moosefoot View Post
              December 8th, 1987... 30 years ago today, the INF treaty was signed between the USSR and the United States:
              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interm..._Forces_Treaty

              It's recently been challenged on and off by both Russia (as the legal heir of the USSR, thus inheriting the USSR-era treaties) and the U.S. - they've been accusing each other of attempting to circumvent said treaty in various ways and occasionally these disputes flare up a bit.

              It's funny and sad at the same time, that back in the day when the USSR was a closed communist superstate behind the iron curtain, at severe odds with the U.S. both ideologically and practically, the two still some-fucking-how managed to conduct diplomacy a lot better than they do now when Russia is a die-hard capitalist, majority Christian democracy (or semi-democracy, at any rate an entirely different place ideologically speaking)
              Agreed. Kruschev coming to America and face to face with Ike and JFK. Now ever owning a Russian brass Samovar would be considered "collusion" by so called "progressives".

              Comment


              • From the WWII Pictures site, posted today:

                Flight Sgt W.L.J. Clark RCAF was shot down and KIA along with all the crew members of 405 Sqn Lancaster on 02/01/1944, 74 years ago today.
                The following is a poem he wrote to his girlfriend Alice....

                If death should come by moonlight, I shall not be afraid
                He comes a friend,
                To blot out hell, man made
                And when the pain's forgotten I know what I'll do
                In that long and endless sleep, I'll dream my love of you.



                Comment


                • I missed the date!

                  24 years ago, July 12th, 1994, Berlin, Germany

                  U.S. Army Berlin was inactivated on the 4th of Juli Platz (next to McNair Barracks) then US President Bill Clinton and German chancellor Helmut Kohl presided over the brigade casing its colors.

                  Comment


                  • 80 years ago, July 25th 1938 , started the Battle of the Ebro, in the Spanish Civil War.

                    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_the_Ebro

                    Comment


                    • 24 years ago this summer,

                      1. the U.S. Army's 6th Infantry Division (Light) deactivated on June 06th, 1994 at Fort Wainwright, Alaska. (1st Brigade, 6th Inf Div) remained. On April 17, 1998, it became the 172nd Infantry Brigade.

                      A website dedicated to the 6th Infantry Division (plenty of detailed information on its WWII formation, deployment to the PTO and combat chronicle)

                      A. https://www.6thinfantry.com/about/a-...ntry-division/

                      2. the U.S. Army's 7th Infantry Division (Light) deactivated on July ??, 1993 at Fort Ord, California. (2nd & 3rd Brigade relocated to Fort Lewis, WA ST) and reflagged as 1st Brigade, 25th Infantry Division in August 1995.

                      A. The final duty station of the 7th Infantry Division; Fort Ord, California, a dated article, however has good information, on post-closure status.

                      http://www.kazu.org/post/fort-ord-20-years-later

                      Fort Ord closed on September 30, 1994. It was one of the largest U.S. military bases ever shutdown. The closure left behind an area of land the size of San Francisco.

                      Comment


                      • 28 August, 1810 -- British surrender at the Battle of Grand Port. French naval victory over the Royal Navy; worst Royal Navy defeat of the Napoleonic War

                        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Grand_Port
                        Last edited by Stonecutter; 28-08-2018, 12:05 PM.

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X