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  • April 28, 1780 -- the Marquis de La Fayette arrives in Boston, carrying a message of French support for the insurgent revolution.

    https://www.facebook.com/marinenatio...94026967287164

    https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/20...2sK/story.html

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    • http://www.history.com/this-day-in-h...tory-in-europe
      World War II

      1945
      Victory in Europe.


      On this day in 1945, both Great Britain and the United States celebrate Victory in Europe Day. Cities in both nations, as well as formerly occupied cities in Western Europe, put out flags and banners, rejoicing in the defeat of the Nazi war machine.

      The eighth of May spelled the day when German troops throughout Europe finally laid down their arms: In Prague, Germans surrendered to their Soviet antagonists, after the latter had lost more than 8,000 soldiers, and the Germans considerably more; in Copenhagen and Oslo; at Karlshorst, near Berlin; in northern Latvia; on the Channel Island of Sark—the German surrender was realized in a final cease-fire. More surrender documents were signed in Berlin and in eastern Germany.

      The main concern of many German soldiers was to elude the grasp of Soviet forces, to keep from being taken prisoner. About 1 million Germans attempted a mass exodus to the West when the fighting in Czechoslovakia ended, but were stopped by the Russians and taken captive. The Russians took approximately 2 million prisoners in the period just before and after the German surrender.

      Meanwhile, more than 13,000 British POWs were released and sent back to Great Britain.
      __________________________________________________ ________________________________________

      May, 8th marks the 72th anniversary of the victory in Europe against Nazism. We shall remember the Americans, Canadians, Brits, French, and on the eastern front the Red Army of Stalin. The day when the ''Thousand years Reich'' and its last leader after the suicide of Hitler, Karl Dönitz surrendered.

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      • 17 May

        On 17 May 1943, was the 25th and last combat flight of the famous Memphis Belle, "flying fortress". B-17 bomber US army air Corps over Europe in WW2.


        http://www.history.com/this-day-in-h...ing-mission​

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        • Mephis Belle FTW

          Death to Germany

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          • this is US military history and Texas military history:

            19 May (1836 about 2 1/2 months after the Alamo fell to the Mexican forces of Santa Anna)
            181 Years ago today

            Fort Parker Texas (a wooden stockade fort) was attacked by Comanche Indians in north central Texas, taken captive was a young ( 9 years old) Cynthia Ann Parker. She was made the wife of a chief of Comanche (Peta Nocona), and gave birth to a boy child who was named Quanah Parker, who himself became an important "chief" in the Comanche group (tribe).

            http://www.history.com/this-day-in-h...r-is-kidnapped

            Quanah Parker https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quanah_Parker

            Quanah Parker is credited as one of the first important leaders of the Native American Church movement.[10] Parker adopted the peyote religion after having been gored in southern Texas by a bull.[citation needed] Parker was visiting his mother's brother, John Parker, in Texas where he was attacked, giving him severe wounds. To fight an onset of blood burning fever, a Mexican curandera was summoned and she prepared a strong peyote tea from fresh peyote to heal him. Thereafter, Quanah Parker became involved with peyote, which contains hordenine, mescaline or phenylethylamine alkaloids, and tyramine which act as natural antibiotics when taken in a combined form

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            • A few weeks overdue however a time not to be forgotten!

              https://www.army.mil/article/187891/...trip_to_bataan

              GARMISCH-PARTENKIRCHEN, Germany (May 17, 2017) -- Peggy Garza, chair of the English Language Program Department at the George C. Marshall European Center's Partner Language Training Center Europe never knew the details of her father's time as a World War II prisoner of war in the Pacific theater. "My father didn't tell us much about his experience," said Garza. Her father's ordeal inspired Garza to take a trip to the Philippines this past April to retrace his steps along the Bataan Death March.

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