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  • #46
    Originally posted by Aradan View Post

    I wasn't able to find anyone I know of from my family in this archive - I am almost disappointed.
    Also, is it just me or is anyone else surprised by the amount and quality of information preserved for over 100 years, considering the amount of war and upheaval that Russia has undergone since the Great War.
    It is amazing sometimes when we realize that the bridge between "them" and "us" is almost nonexistent, but yes, one should appreciate the scrutiny and amount of hard work put behind keeping the archives of Russian Empire and SU available for all of us. Wonderful job.

    Comment


    • #47
      Front-line correspondent of the newspaper "Red Star", battalion commissar Simonov talks with captured Romanian artillerymen near Odessa. Separate Seaside Army, August 28, 1941:



      PS: he was a very famous WW2 writer, a poet, and a playwright. More than a dozen Soviet war movies were based on his books.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Konstantin_Simonov
      Last edited by jsilver; 28-08-2017, 06:58 AM.

      Comment


      • #48
        Armored patrol boat BK-31 raised from Volga. It was sunk in days of Stalingrad battle 9.10.1942 . Commander of armored boat Lieutenant Nikitin Pavel Arkhipovich was 23 year old .



        foto
        http://trinixy.ru/152639-so-dna-volg...ad-6-foto.html

        List of сommanders losses of Volga flottila . date 10/11/1942 (Nikitin №6)

        Comment


        • #49
          F.E. Dzerzhinsky and the troops of the Cheka during the Civil War in Russia 1918 - 1922. (To the 140th anniversary of the birth of FE Dzerzhinsky and the 100th anniversary of the troops of the Cheka) Russian State Military Archive
          http://rgvarchive.ru/dzvchk.html

          documents
          http://rgvarchive.ru/dzdoc1.html

          photos
          http://rgvarchive.ru/dzfoto1.shtml

          audio
          http://rgvarchive.ru/fonodoKumenty.shtml

          Comment


          • #50
            Moscow's Central Armed Forces Museum among other exhibits has Lithuanian 20 mm Flak 30. Lithuanian designation for this AA canons is LAP (lėktuvinis automatinis pabūklas). It was captured by soviets during occupation of Baltic states in 1940 and probably sent to Moscow for trials. Central Armed Forces Museum is showing it in the hall dedicated to the battles of initial phase of Great Patriotic War and they portray it as trophy captured from Wehrmacht which is untrue. I guess that from Lithuanian POV it is simply stolen, Russians probably treat it as some sort of trophy.

            Back in 1939 Lithuanian Armed Forces bought 150 units of 20 mm Flak 30 canons, 81000 rounds and license for ammunition production from Berlin–Suhler Waffen–und Fahrzeugwerke for 8,5 million litas (litas was Lithuanian currency). First 120 canons reached Lithuania in 1939 while remaining 30 in 1940. To my best knowledge no other fully assembled Lithuanian Flak has survived.

            Here is very detailed photo gallery (129 photos!) about this unique (for Lithuania) canon. It seems that somebody has stolen couple of plates with text inscriptions.

            Interesting if Russian side would agree to trade it for military exhibits that have historical/ideological value for Russia? All negative emotions aside can somebody with knowledge comment this (possibility of trade)?

            Comment


            • #51
              Originally posted by AurimasLT View Post
              Moscow's Central Armed Forces Museum among other exhibits has Lithuanian 20 mm Flak 30. Lithuanian designation for this AA canons is LAP (lėktuvinis automatinis pabūklas). It was captured by soviets during occupation of Baltic states in 1940 and probably sent to Moscow for trials. Central Armed Forces Museum is showing it in the hall dedicated to the battles of initial phase of Great Patriotic War and they portray it as trophy captured from Wehrmacht which is untrue. I guess that from Lithuanian POV it is simply stolen, Russians probably treat it as some sort of trophy.

              Back in 1939 Lithuanian Armed Forces bought 150 units of 20 mm Flak 30 canons, 81000 rounds and license for ammunition production from Berlin–Suhler Waffen–und Fahrzeugwerke for 8,5 million litas (litas was Lithuanian currency). First 120 canons reached Lithuania in 1939 while remaining 30 in 1940. To my best knowledge no other fully assembled Lithuanian Flak has survived.
              Still it can be. I remember photo of POWs in Leningrad, dated august 1941 and one solder was in latvian uniform. So, german could sent locals (maybe with weapons from warehouses) to battles on the earlest stages of war.



              Originally posted by AurimasLT View Post
              Interesting if Russian side would agree to trade it for military exhibits that have historical/ideological value for Russia? All negative emotions aside can somebody with knowledge comment this (possibility of trade)?
              Maybe yes, Year ago Kubinka tank museum return to Israel Magach 3 tank
              https://tankandafvnews.com/2016/05/2...tured-in-1982/


              Comment


              • #52
                Originally posted by jsilver View Post
                August, 1916, lower ranks of 11th field army of Russia are expecting a gas attack:



                South-Western front.

                PS: my grand-grandfather died in one of those... he was 18.
                Winchester Model 1895 rifle muskets

                Comment


                • #53
                  The bayonets are interesting as well, there were a very, very small number of bayonet wounds reported by the British and French. (I realize these are Russians fighting Germans) One theory is that a bayonet wound was usually fatal and would not have survived to get to an aide station, the other was that, as one British soldier remarked, he never saw a German with a fixed bayonet.

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Electronic exhibitions
                    Stalingrad , dedicated to 75th anniversary
                    http://stalingrad.rusarchives.ru/

                    History of creation of Red Army in photo and phono documents

                    http://красная-армия.ргафд.рф/


                    news ,(i wish all military commisariants will joint this)

                    The project to digitize the documents of military commisariots 1939-1946 "Remember everyone" launched in Khabarovsk krai
                    Khabarovsk regional military enlistment office donated to the state archive of the region 249 volumes of documents related to the great Patriotic war: lists of called, repatriated, killed, mobilized for industrial enterprises. In 2018, 59 volumes will be digitized in 11 districts of the Khabarovsk territory ), after which the electronic information resource of the project "Remember everyone" will be available to users in the form of a database on the Internet.

                    https://komza.khabkrai.ru/events/Novosti/2091

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      http://vm.ee/sites/default/files/con..._treasures.pdf

                      The President of the Republic of Estonia’s sign of office in the Kremlin Armoury in Moscow

                      The sign of office of the President of the Republic of Estonia – the Collar of the Order of the National Coat of Arms – is in many aspects a piece of art and a relic of symbolic significance to Estonia. The Order of the National Coat of Arms was instituted in 1936 in order to commemorate 24 February 1918, the day on which Estonian independence was declared. The Order of the National Coat of Arms is bestowed only on Estonian citizens as a decoration of the highest class for services rendered to the state. A special class of the Order is the Collar of the Order of the National Coat of Arms. The Act provides that the Order of the National Coat of Arms is the sign of office of the President of the Republic and shall be passed on together with the office of the President of the Republic. There is one copy of the sign of office and cannot be awarded to anyone. The Order of the National Coat of Arms and the collar were designed by Paul Luhtein, one of Estonia’s most famous artists. The Estonian Presidential Sign of Office – the Collar of the Order of the National Coat of Arms

                      In June 1940 when the Soviet Union occupied Estonia, Konstantin Päts formally remained in the President’s office until 22 July even after the formation of a puppet government. Nine days later he was arrested and deported with his family. Tormented over the years in many prisons, Päts died in 1956 as a detainee of the Burashevo psycho-neuro hospital. For Estonia as an occupied country incorporated into the Soviet Union, the soviet power structure did not foresee a President entitled to bear the Collar of the Order of the National Coat of Arms.

                      When war broke out between the Soviet Union and Germany in the summer of 1941, the communist activists fleeing from the German powers took the Collar of the Order of the National Coat of Arms to Russia. In 1963, the sign of office of the President of the Republic of Estonia was transferred from the USSR Finance Ministry’s Deposit for National Treasures to the collections of the Kremlin Armoury museum.

                      Upon the restoration of Estonia’s independence, the reclamation of the Collar of the Order of the National Coat of Arms from Russia resulted in the denial of its existence. Thereafter, it was maintained that indeed there is a similar collar in the Kremlin Armoury, but it has nothing to do with the sign of office of the Estonian President. Thereupon Estonia proved with the help of archival documents, photographs, Paul Luhtein’s drafts and written explanations that the sign of office of the President of the Republic of Estonia was indeed made in just a single copy and that this is the very one kept in the Kremlin Armoury. For the first time, Estonian representatives succeeded in seeing the national relic towards the end of 1994. Subsequently, Estonia has repeatedly raised the question of returning the sign of office and although many higher officials of the Russian Federation have reiterated that there are no obstacles to returning the President’s sign of office to Estonia, it remains to this very day in the Kremlin Armoury in Moscow.

                      Comment


                      • #56
                        Originally posted by jsilver View Post
                        August, 1916, lower ranks of 11th field army of Russia are expecting a gas attack:



                        South-Western front.

                        PS: my grand-grandfather died in one of those... he was 18.
                        Can anyone tell me what the cross on the soldier's uniform is?

                        Comment


                        • #57
                          Originally posted by Cowboy's daughter View Post

                          Can anyone tell me what the cross on the soldier's uniform is?
                          Order of Saint George, most probably. 4th class or so.

                          Comment


                          • #58
                            Originally posted by moosefoot View Post

                            Order of Saint George, most probably. 4th class or so.
                            Thank you, moosefoot!

                            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Order_of_St._George

                            Recipients of the Order fourth class

                            Comment


                            • #59
                              Yeah, no, that's way over the top I think. Hell, looking at that list even I know about half of them. Famous folk.

                              My bad... I'd say pop it down a notch, to the Cross of Saint George.

                              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cross_of_St._George

                              And there you got over a million recipients of the 4th class order. Bit harder to track down.

                              Comment


                              • #60
                                Very interesting


                                See 'Ribbons and Medals', by H Taprell Dorling:

                                "The Order of St. George...was awarded only for conspicuous bravery in action against the enemy...

                                "Over two million Crosses and Medals of St. George were distributed to soldiers, sisters of mercy, and members of Red Cross institutions and hospitals during the First World War...

                                "The Order of St. George was essentially military, and could never be conferred upon civilians except for services actually under fire...

                                "The black and orange ribbon of this Order meant 'through Darkness to Light,' ..."

                                A photograph is included, a Maltese cross captioned: 'ORDER OF ST. GEORGE Insignia of the Third Class.' The book does say a Fourth Class was also awarded. As with all the old Russian Orders, it was "abolished in December 1917".

                                https://www.greatwarforum.org/topic/...oss-4th-class/

                                List of recipients of St George cross - Imperial Russia

                                http://gmic.co.uk/topic/60515-list-o...perial-russia/

                                Orders and Medals of
                                Imperial Russia
                                (1800-1815)

                                https://www.greatwarforum.org/topic/...oss-4th-class/

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