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  • #46
    Originally posted by Aradan View Post

    I wasn't able to find anyone I know of from my family in this archive - I am almost disappointed.
    Also, is it just me or is anyone else surprised by the amount and quality of information preserved for over 100 years, considering the amount of war and upheaval that Russia has undergone since the Great War.
    It is amazing sometimes when we realize that the bridge between "them" and "us" is almost nonexistent, but yes, one should appreciate the scrutiny and amount of hard work put behind keeping the archives of Russian Empire and SU available for all of us. Wonderful job.

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    • #47
      Front-line correspondent of the newspaper "Red Star", battalion commissar Simonov talks with captured Romanian artillerymen near Odessa. Separate Seaside Army, August 28, 1941:



      PS: he was a very famous WW2 writer, a poet, and a playwright. More than a dozen Soviet war movies were based on his books.
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Konstantin_Simonov
      Last edited by jsilver; 28-08-2017, 06:58 AM.

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      • #48
        Armored patrol boat BK-31 raised from Volga. It was sunk in days of Stalingrad battle 9.10.1942 . Commander of armored boat Lieutenant Nikitin Pavel Arkhipovich was 23 year old .



        foto
        http://trinixy.ru/152639-so-dna-volg...ad-6-foto.html

        List of сommanders losses of Volga flottila . date 10/11/1942 (Nikitin №6)

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        • #49
          F.E. Dzerzhinsky and the troops of the Cheka during the Civil War in Russia 1918 - 1922. (To the 140th anniversary of the birth of FE Dzerzhinsky and the 100th anniversary of the troops of the Cheka) Russian State Military Archive
          http://rgvarchive.ru/dzvchk.html

          documents
          http://rgvarchive.ru/dzdoc1.html

          photos
          http://rgvarchive.ru/dzfoto1.shtml

          audio
          http://rgvarchive.ru/fonodoKumenty.shtml

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          • #50
            Moscow's Central Armed Forces Museum among other exhibits has Lithuanian 20 mm Flak 30. Lithuanian designation for this AA canons is LAP (lėktuvinis automatinis pabūklas). It was captured by soviets during occupation of Baltic states in 1940 and probably sent to Moscow for trials. Central Armed Forces Museum is showing it in the hall dedicated to the battles of initial phase of Great Patriotic War and they portray it as trophy captured from Wehrmacht which is untrue. I guess that from Lithuanian POV it is simply stolen, Russians probably treat it as some sort of trophy.

            Back in 1939 Lithuanian Armed Forces bought 150 units of 20 mm Flak 30 canons, 81000 rounds and license for ammunition production from Berlin–Suhler Waffen–und Fahrzeugwerke for 8,5 million litas (litas was Lithuanian currency). First 120 canons reached Lithuania in 1939 while remaining 30 in 1940. To my best knowledge no other fully assembled Lithuanian Flak has survived.

            Here is very detailed photo gallery (129 photos!) about this unique (for Lithuania) canon. It seems that somebody has stolen couple of plates with text inscriptions.

            Interesting if Russian side would agree to trade it for military exhibits that have historical/ideological value for Russia? All negative emotions aside can somebody with knowledge comment this (possibility of trade)?

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            • #51
              Originally posted by AurimasLT View Post
              Moscow's Central Armed Forces Museum among other exhibits has Lithuanian 20 mm Flak 30. Lithuanian designation for this AA canons is LAP (lėktuvinis automatinis pabūklas). It was captured by soviets during occupation of Baltic states in 1940 and probably sent to Moscow for trials. Central Armed Forces Museum is showing it in the hall dedicated to the battles of initial phase of Great Patriotic War and they portray it as trophy captured from Wehrmacht which is untrue. I guess that from Lithuanian POV it is simply stolen, Russians probably treat it as some sort of trophy.

              Back in 1939 Lithuanian Armed Forces bought 150 units of 20 mm Flak 30 canons, 81000 rounds and license for ammunition production from Berlin–Suhler Waffen–und Fahrzeugwerke for 8,5 million litas (litas was Lithuanian currency). First 120 canons reached Lithuania in 1939 while remaining 30 in 1940. To my best knowledge no other fully assembled Lithuanian Flak has survived.
              Still it can be. I remember photo of POWs in Leningrad, dated august 1941 and one solder was in latvian uniform. So, german could sent locals (maybe with weapons from warehouses) to battles on the earlest stages of war.



              Originally posted by AurimasLT View Post
              Interesting if Russian side would agree to trade it for military exhibits that have historical/ideological value for Russia? All negative emotions aside can somebody with knowledge comment this (possibility of trade)?
              Maybe yes, Year ago Kubinka tank museum return to Israel Magach 3 tank
              https://tankandafvnews.com/2016/05/2...tured-in-1982/


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              • #52
                Originally posted by jsilver View Post
                August, 1916, lower ranks of 11th field army of Russia are expecting a gas attack:



                South-Western front.

                PS: my grand-grandfather died in one of those... he was 18.
                Winchester Model 1895 rifle muskets

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                • #53
                  The bayonets are interesting as well, there were a very, very small number of bayonet wounds reported by the British and French. (I realize these are Russians fighting Germans) One theory is that a bayonet wound was usually fatal and would not have survived to get to an aide station, the other was that, as one British soldier remarked, he never saw a German with a fixed bayonet.

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