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  • ROK (South Korea) Armed Forces Discussion

    The title is self explanatory. Here's one of the latest pieces of news:

    There have been numerous of discussions on the possible deployment of the THAAD system in South Korea. China’s attitude has been increasingly clear and firm – Don’t do it, for everybody’s sake.
    Naturally, from China’s perspective, it’s uncomfortable to have an advanced missile defense system deployed in the territory of one of its closest neighbors. This system, once truly deployed, will definitely bring about both real (military) and symbolic (psychological) concerns to China.
    But beyond that, THAAD deployment, which has yet to be finally confirmed, could pose two less obvious but serious diplomatic challenges for China.
    First, THAAD could conceivably check both China and South Korea in the East Asian power game. The hidden message from the United States could be that the Beijing-Seoul honeymoon will always have to give way to traditional security ties between Seoul and Washington. That means Seoul’s diplomacy with Beijing will be constrained every time U.S. politicians decide to invoke South Korean security concerns regarding the North Korean nuclear and missile threat. Merely the discussions between Seoul and Washington regarding THAAD — forget about the actual deployment — will be a very uncomfortable wedge driven into China’s painstakingly-built good neighbors policy with South Korea. No wonder some Chinese believe that the United States is actually alienating both China and South Korea with talk of THAAD deployment. China may be confident in South Korea’s economic reliance, but an “unfriendly” decision to deploy THAAD will be regarded in China not only as a humiliation, but as a stab in the back.
    Second, THAAD deployment in South Korea could also further alienate and estrange China and North Korea. China may try to remain evasive when asked about the Treaty of Friendship, Cooperation and Mutual Assistance with North Korea, but it can’t escape the facts. China indeed has a very strong, almost inescapable responsibility for (and obligation to defend) North Korea’s survival and security, however vocally North Korea advocates self-reliance. THAAD could drive another wedge between Pyongyang and Beijing, as Pyongyang has vowed to respond by further developing its nuclear capabilities.
    Two possibilities are even more worrying to China. First, North Korea may complain about and even blame China for its inability to prevent THAAD deployment. Second, North Korea may use more hazardous or proactive means as counter-measures against the threat from the United States and South Korea, as it has already threatened. Both of these two possibilities are giving China a headache.
    Given the negative diplomatic consequences for China, Beijing may suspect that the United States is trying to kill two birds with one stone by advocating for THAAD. Even if the deployment seems inevitable, expect China to counter it by making the process lengthy and the price high, both economically and politically.
    http://thediplomat.com/2015/04/the-o...ad-deployment/

    The PROC is playing the hard ball. If South Korea gets barred from the AIIB development bank by China for allowing the THAAD deployment by the US, it could have severe repercussions for the ROK economy.

  • #2
    South Korea then should threaten to withdraw all Hallyu Wave activities in China

    Little off-topic, but I advocate Ambassador to re-post ALL of his informative stuff from MP.net to here to get this place a good head start. It would be big waste to see it go.

    Comment


    • #3
      I'd like to revisit this old discussion. does anyone have any more info or a time line on this?

      An Army general-turned-lawmaker has revealed a dark chapter in Korean history, saying he volunteered for tit-for-tat retaliation raids in 1967 that killed 33 North Korean soldiers and sabotaged some 50 “enemy” facilities.

      “Our troops’ morale was seriously undermined as the communist North deployed a host of armed infiltrators at that time who took the lives of many South Koreans and destroyed major facilities,” the 73-year-old lawmaker recalled. “Something had to be done to stop it.”

      North Korean commandos allegedly infiltrated into the South 57 times in 1966 and 118 times in 1967, fueling fears of widening North Korean attacks.

      Lee said the North’s actions reached a peak in 1967, when in a general assembly of the Central Committee of the Workers' Party in March that year then North Korean leader Kim Il-sung instructed the military to beef up infiltration activities.

      In response, Lee, who served as the head of an Army intelligence unit, requested his commander, Maj. Gen. Yoon Pil-yong, to authorize a series of perilous missions.

      “Concerned about safety, Yoon tried to dissuade me,” Lee said. “But I insisted on taking revenge against the communist regime with captured North Korean commandos who had renounced communism and chosen to have a new life in the democratic South.”

      A declassified military document obtained by the newspaper shows that Lee, whose rank was captain at the time, selected and trained six former North Korean infiltrators.

      “It only took me two weeks to get the six converted North Korean agents ready for the mission as all of them were highly skilled and physically fit for combat operations,” he said.

      Lee carried out three retaliation missions in late 1967. Each time, he selected three of the North Korean soldiers to assist him.

      In the first mission on Sept. 27, his unit encountered 15 North Korean soldiers when making a shelter after crossing the Geumseong Stream in front of a North Korean military division.

      ``We spotted North Korean soldiers who were laying wooden-boxed land mines,” Lee said. “Of them only two, the platoon leader and a first sergeant, were carrying guns, assuming that it was safe to do so in their own military area.”

      He instructed his operatives to shoot the two armed North Korean soldiers first and kill the rest after.

      “We shot all of them again to make sure they were dead, except two young soldiers, who managed to flee,” Lee said.

      The former four-star general carried out the second operation on Oct. 14, 1964, only two weeks after the first one.

      Lee’s mission was to kill the commander of a military division, but he failed to do so due to heavy security.

      In the last mission on Oct 18, 1967, his team cut barbed wire along the heavily-fortified inter-Korean border, and sneaked into a guard post in the North.

      “Dressed in a North Korean uniform, I opened the door of the guard post barracks and tossed in grenades,” Lee said. “We killed all 20 soldiers there, including one who hid in a bathroom.”

      Of the six converted North Korean commandoes he worked with, one was killed while in action, according to Lee.

      Lee also remembers that a regiment in the 21st Army Division followed suit after its deputy commander, Lt. Colonel Hong Doo-pyo, was found dead with his throat allegedly cut by North Korean soldiers in 1967.

      Lee claims the North’s provocations significantly dropped after the South’s tit-for-tat retaliations until Jan. 21, 1968, when the North sent 31 elite commandos in a failed attempt to assassinate then-South Korean President Park Chung-hee.

      An estimated 13,000 people have been trained as agents in South Korea since 1951 with the aim of retaliating against the North’s armed infiltrations, destroying major military facilities and collecting military intelligence.

      Some 8,000 reportedly lost their lives as many of them had to undertake suicide missions or repeatedly carry out dangerous operations.



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      • #4
        This eerily reminds me of the declassified meeting between Henry Kissinger and a few high-ranking officials in 1976 (George Bush from the CIA, Philip Habib from State Department, William Clements who was Deputy Secretary of Defense, General George S.Brown from JCS, William Hyland from NSC and William Gleysteen who was the US ambassador to the ROK).

        Aside from the missions that occurred in 1967, Clements mentioned there was a total of at least 200 raids or incursions conducted by the South Korean military, likely by captured-and-retrained NK commandos and ROK special forces. Then there's also the Air Force-trained Unit 684, whose mission was to actually assassinate Kim Il-sung.

        Unfortunately, details regarding the rest of these operations are hard to come by, if at all (if anything, they probably won't be available to the public for a fairly long time).


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        • #5
          SEOUL, South Korea — After four and a half years of low-key yet highly sensitive negotiations, the United States and South Korea announced a revised treaty on Wednesday that continues to deny — but not permanently rule out — South Korea the right to enrich uranium or reprocess spent nuclear fuel, even for peaceful purposes.
          South Korea has been prevented from enriching uranium and reprocessing spent-fuel, technologies used by countries such as North Korea to make nuclear weapons, under a 1972 treaty in which the United States helped South Korea build its nascent nuclear energy industry.
          The two governments started negotiations in 2010 to rewrite the treaty, which was originally set to expire in 2013. But their differences were too big to resolve, leading them to sign a separate deal to extend the expiration date. South Korea insisted in the talks that it needed to enrich uranium to produce fuel for its fast-expanding nuclear energy industry. It also wanted to reprocess spent fuel to reduce its nuclear waste storage.





          But the United States maintained that allowing South Korea to employ those technologies, even for peaceful purposes, would set a bad precedent and undermine its global efforts to discourage the spread of activities that can be used to produce weapons-usable nuclear materials.
          Both sides announced on Wednesday that they had completed the bargaining, with the United States ambassador, Mark Lippert, and Park Ro-byug, the chief South Korean negotiator, initialing the text during a ceremony in Seoul, the South Korean capital. The agreement is subject to review by the United States Congress.
          The new treaty does not allow South Korea to enrich uranium or reprocess spent fuel anytime soon. But it does not commit South Korea to legally renounce these techniques either.
          Instead, it leaves open the possibility that South Korea could enrich uranium for civil nuclear energy “in the future through consultations with the United States.” In the meantime, Washington promised to help secure a supply of nuclear fuel for South Korean atomic power plants, Seoul said in a news release.
          The deal also created the option for South Korea to have its spent fuel reprocessed abroad in countries that both Seoul and Washington believed posed no proliferation risk.
          The United States also promised to help South Korea find new nuclear waste management options that would be economically viable and more proliferation-resistant. As part of such efforts, South Korea said its scientists would be allowed to do early experiments on a kind of nuclear reprocessing known as pyroprocessing.
          The new treaty also establishes a high-level committee that will assess the implementation of the treaty.
          The United States hailed the treaty as reaffirming “the two governments’ shared commitment to nonproliferation.” Ju Chul-ki, senior secretary for foreign affairs for President Park Geun-hye of South Korea, said the agreement reflected his country’s status as a major player in civil nuclear energy.
          Lee Byong-chul, a senior fellow at the Institute for Peace and Cooperation in Seoul, said the deal was beneficial for both countries, though it reminded South Koreans of the constraints placed upon their country’s nuclear industry.
          South Korea is the world’s fifth-largest nuclear energy producer, with 23 reactors providing 36 percent of the country’s electricity needs. It has also presented nuclear power plants as one of its new export items. (The country is building four reactors for the United Arab Emirates.)
          Yet the country currently has to import all of its enriched uranium fuel because of the obligations imposed under the treaty with the United States. After decades of running nuclear power plants, nuclear waste has also become a growing concern. In this small, densely populated country with an increasingly vociferous environmental movement, building a new, central repository for its spent nuclear fuel has become a huge headache for the government.
          http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/23/wo...deal.html?_r=0

          Disgusting. If the US wants to deploy THAAD and its sensors in South Korea, I say the ROK demand rights to enrich its own nuclear fuel.

          The Japanese are allowed to. And South Korea needs the capability for its own nuclear industry.

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          • #6
            which are the airborne/air assault units of the ROK army/marines?

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            • #7
              Video of Special Assault Commandos

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              • #8
                Program about Combat Control Team(CCT)

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                • #9
                  Special Warfare Command(SWC)

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                  • #10
                    ROK Defense Ministry announced their plan to devlop and manufacture new generation tank, K3. Current batches of K2 will only replace ROKMC's M48A3K, and Army's M48A5s will live on until 2030s with new upgrades. The K3 will most likely to equip railgun or at least ETC gun, and will feature invisible camo, defense system, electronic system, etc etc. The development will start within few years, and the first prototype is scheduled on 2030. K2 is superior than any of Nork's, yet the MOD wants to be prepared in any case.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Szeklerdude View Post
                      which are the airborne/air assault units of the ROK army/marines?

                      From what I recall, the Special Assault Commandos are air assault-trained, given their role as rapid-response light infantry units to counter North Korean guerrilla units. Among those units, the 203rd Special Assault Commando Brigade was also renamed as the 1st Air Assault Brigade way back in the early 2000s, being assigned to Air Operations Command before it was reassigned and renamed back into its old name and unit (2nd Operations Command).

                      I'm not sure if they are actually part of the SAC, though the 7th Assault Battalion (replacing the 707th SAC Regiment in 1994) also is an air assault unit that is part of the VII Corps.

                      As for airborne, only the ROK SWC's special forces brigades are airborne-qualified.

                      Not sure about the Marines though, other than that their Reconnaissance Battalions (and Company, in the case of the 6th Marine Brigade) are airborne-qualified.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Kadrun View Post
                        ROK Defense Ministry announced their plan to devlop and manufacture new generation tank, K3. Current batches of K2 will only replace ROKMC's M48A3K, and Army's M48A5s will live on until 2030s with new upgrades. The K3 will most likely to equip railgun or at least ETC gun, and will feature invisible camo, defense system, electronic system, etc etc. The development will start within few years, and the first prototype is scheduled on 2030. K2 is superior than any of Nork's, yet the MOD wants to be prepared in any case.
                        Why not upgrade K2 with ETC gun and all the good stuff? From what I understand, it was supposed to be super-upgradeable. And now they announce new tank within years of K2 fielding? While North Korea can hardly boast anything to counter K2? Strange.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by hythelday View Post

                          Why not upgrade K2 with ETC gun and all the good stuff? From what I understand, it was supposed to be super-upgradeable. And now they announce new tank within years of K2 fielding? While North Korea can hardly boast anything to counter K2? Strange.
                          The MoD wants something that can overwhelm any tanks that are going to enter service soon or in development such as T-14 Armata. The MoD even stated that it won't be comparable to any, and will be totally different generation in every aspects.

                          What I think of this is a plan ahead like US & UK's MBT 2030 project. In addition, Korea will share its borders with China and Russia when unification really happens.

                          I just noticed new MBT or major upgrades goes by almost every 15 years for ROKA.
                          Last edited by Kadrun; 17-05-2015, 07:43 PM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Kadrun View Post
                            The MoD wants something that can overwhelm any tanks that are going to enter service soon or in development such as T-14 Armata. The MoD even stated that it won't be comparable to any, and will be totally different generation in every aspects.

                            What I think of this is a plan ahead like US & UK's MBT 2030 project. In addition, Korea will share its borders with China and Russia when unification really happens.

                            I just noticed new MBT or major upgrades goes by almost every 15 years for ROKA.
                            As I said in he old thread, Korea has the money, the tech and the will to develop new & awesome tanks.
                            That is an interesting perspective. Do ROK high-ups know something we don't? About common border with Russia & PRC I mean...

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                            • #15
                              K2 rifle series are scheduled to be mass produced until 2030 to completely remove M16A1 from reserve forces. I guess next generation rifle program is not going to happen soon.

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