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  • The Finnish Defence Forces

    Estonian unit will join Finnish-Irish battalion in Lebanon with 50 soldiers in UNIFIL operation. The total strength of the battalion is currently around 500 soldiers, with 350 Finns and rest being Irish.

    http://www.puolustusvoimat.fi/portal...c1f7134f56479c

  • #2
    Finnish fighter planes in the Netherlands and Baltics for exercises

    Six Finnish Air Force F/A-18 fighter aircraft are currently in the Netherlands taking part in multi-national exercises under the auspices of the NATO Partnership for Peace programme. Next week, two Finnish fighters will be flying training missions over the Baltic States.

    Finland is the only non-NATO country taking part.
    Here: http://yle.fi/uutiset/finnish_fighte...rcises/7933422

    Good news. Has anyone seen photos of the exercise?

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    • #3
      Originally posted by PEMM View Post
      Here: http://yle.fi/uutiset/finnish_fighte...rcises/7933422

      Good news. Has anyone seen photos of the exercise?
      http://www.prk-aviation.nl/frisianflag2015.htm

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      • #4
        What is this then... Gripen and Rafale contenders to replace Hornet:
        http://airheadsfly.com/2015/04/06/fi...pen-or-rafale/

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        • #5
          According to FiAF commander Jäämeri all fighter producers that have a production line open are welcome to the tender. One question is if Boeing still has a line open at the time.

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          • #6
            Finnish members, how do the elections help or hurt Finnish Military? What are the effects on EU and NATO relations?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Im_Nt_Ur_Buddy_Guy View Post
              Finnish members, how do the elections help or hurt Finnish Military? What are the effects on EU and NATO relations?
              The general consensus of most parties has been to increase defense spending. The centre party, who won the elections is not overtly pro-Nato and pro-EU, as the National coalition party has been. Neither is the second, True finns party. Apparently, if they are both in the government, no Nato or even new bailout-packages.

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              • #8
                It's really comes down to who will be in the government. As the biggest party (the Centre Party) only got just above 21% of the votes, it's quite unclear on how the new coalition government will look. Before the election the signs seemed to suggest a centre-left-liberal coalition (which still is a possibility, but not as big one as before since the Social Democrats fell more than expected and ended up fourth).

                As far as experts go they think the possibilities look something like this (in order of probability):

                -Centre-right coalition: Centre Party, National Coalition Party, The Greens, Swedish People's Party. This is coalition between two big parties and two smaller, and considered to likely better toe the Government line than the other possible versions. Two of these parties (Coalition and Swedish People's) are openly pro-Nato, the other two are either neutral or slightly anti-, but would most likely not veto anything or leave the Government over it. It should be noted that the Green League in Finland is much more right-leaning than many other Green Parties. The voters usually are urban professionals, socially and economically fairly liberal, but pro-environment and anti-nuclear power. This government would support the military and EU, but not do anything about NATO, unless anything very radical would take place.

                -Triumvirate: Centre Party, Finns Party, National Coalition Party. This is a coalition between the three biggest parties in the Parliament and would as a whole provide a strong base. If it can be kept together. The thing is that one party always would be the vote controller, and as such hold the two others at ransom in questions within the Government, since no two party version could ever get more than slightly under 40%. Experts have considered this version slightly less likely than the one above since even if they on paper look a bit similar there are huge differences between the Coalition Party and the Finns in particular, when it comes to the EU, Russia, social welfare and immigration. There are also differences between the Centre and Finns and Centre and Coalition, so the negotiations would be tough for the new Prime Minister, particularly since the Finns thus far have not exactly excelled when it comes to loyalty. This would be a somewhat pro-national defence, but almost certainly quite anti-EU and somewhat anti-Nato. It would also be the most Russia-friendly version.

                -Centre-left coalition: Centre Party, Social Democrats, The Greens, Swedish People's Party. Before the election this was considered the most likely Government base, but as stated above the Social Democrats lost the most seats of all parties, compared to the last election, so would get a smaller majority. As with the first version the smaller parties are both small and liberal, so could very well work with both a centre left and a centre right coalition. As almost all parties already have agreed to a increase in defence spending, this would also be somewhat pro-defence, and somewhat pro-EU, but more anti-NATO than any other version.


                The last two parties, the Left Alliance and the Christian Democrats both lost and will almost certainly remain in opposition, since their views on policies either deviate most of all from other parties, or they have to few places to make any particular difference. This, together with the PM presumptives pledge to cut down the number of ministers from 17 to 12, and the tradition that every coalition member gets at least one minister, will leave them outside.

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                • #9
                  So I have seen the video about Stinger training in Karelian Brigade and I have a question:

                  Is lifting operator in a Pekkaniska-style crane a valid tactic, or is it just something done during training? Seems a bit funny to me, however, we all know that if something looks stupid but works, it ain't stupid.

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                  • #10
                    No, as far as I'm aware this is a genuine tactic to get above the tree canopy in the forrest and between buildings. Some of these were bought in 2008 for the ItO 2005M.
                    http://www.f-sds.com/products/item/42/

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Anzu View Post
                      No, as far as I'm aware this is a genuine tactic to get above the tree canopy in the forrest and between buildings. Some of these were bought in 2008 for the ItO 2005M.
                      http://www.f-sds.com/products/item/42/
                      Reminds me of this http://starwars.wikia.com/wiki/Yavin_4?file=Y42.JPG
                      Thanks.

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                      • #12
                        US news magazine Newsweek published an article Friday afternoon featuring the headline “Finnish military preparing 900,000 reservists for ‘crisis situation’”. The communications staff of the Finnish Defence Forces rushed set the record straight on Saturday, saying that the campaign to send a letter out to all of Finland’s reservists was two years in the making, and therefore has nothing to do with the security situation in the country at present.

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                        • #13
                          They actually fixed their article. Quite unusual.

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                          • #14
                            Is the updating of information and sending of information routine in the FDF? Also is it normal to go to 900,000 when 230,000 is the wartime strength? The reason that I ask is that here in the US getting updated contact information, particularly from the members of the Individual Ready Reserve is an everyday occurrence.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by JimHPTN View Post
                              Is the updating of information and sending of information routine in the FDF? Also is it normal to go to 900,000 when 230,000 is the wartime strength? The reason that I ask is that here in the US getting updated contact information, particularly from the members of the Individual Ready Reserve is an everyday occurrence.
                              The military has gone through a major reforms. The number of reserves has dropped from 500 000 to 230 000. At the same time old organizations have been disbanded. People who have not been very active on reserves cannot really know their position atm without separately asking it.

                              Many jobs are deemed important by the defense forces (police, firemen, hospital staff, people working on important infrastructure etc.), so even if they had been trained for position in readiness brigade, they would still continue their jobs. And it is also important for people who would be considered a reinforcements to know that.

                              Many people have not updated their information (like occupation) on government records, so the letter also acts as a reminder to do that.

                              EDIT: The advertisement stated that "Everyone will have a part to play in the defense of Finland, even if it it's not in the reserves."
                              Last edited by PEMM; 03-05-2015, 09:05 AM.

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