Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Situation in Afghanistan

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Private Sector Development and Economic Growth: Lessons from the U.S. experience in Afghanistan
    This report – the third in a series of lessons learned reports by SIGAR – examines the U.S. government’s support to private sector development in Afghanistan since 2001, through efforts led by the U.S. Agency for International Development and additional significant roles played by the Departments of State, Defense, Commerce, and Treasury.

    SIGAR’s analysis highlights the difficulty of supporting economic development in a war-shattered country. Afghanistan’s early economic gains were largely due to foreign spending and were not sustainable. Optimistic predictions of future progress did not reflect the reality of Afghanistan’s economic and security environment, the capacity of institutions, its relations with its neighbors, or the impact of corruption. The U.S. government and other stakeholders failed to understand the relationships between corrupt strongmen and powerholders, and the speed at which Afghanistan could transition to a Western-style market economy.





    Comment


    • When the Taliban Are at the Gates, a City Has One Choice: Pay Up

      What does it feel like to live in an Afghan city on the brink of falling to the Taliban?

      The residents of Ghazni, a provincial capital of 280,000 about 110 miles south of the capital, Kabul, on a main highway, can hardly tell anymore who’s in charge, and fear has become an everyday companion.

      With the Taliban controlling some of the road network around Ghazni, citizens have long felt vulnerable. But during a recent visit, I kept hearing an even greater sense of defenselessness. Many here fear a full-on effort by the Taliban to seize the city could come at any time.

      Not content to merely control access to the city, the insurgents have begun attacking police posts within it. The Taliban methodically extort money — they say it is taxation — from businesses in the city center, including those near the government headquarters, and an increasing number of insurgents live openly in the city. Their fighters regularly kill officials, security personnel and even traffic police officers.

      A Taliban court claims jurisdiction over the city and its outskirts, and carries out floggings, and even, sometimes, stonings.
      https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/07/w...an-ghazni.html



      Comment


      • Originally posted by Lord Helmet View Post
        This war isn't going away anytime soon. ANA is there for a paycheck and nothing else, Taliban is there because of their fanatical believes and to keep the poppy business flowing. ANA will keep fighting as long as the US keeps paying their salaries, Taliban will keep fighting as long as they have safe havens across the border and the drugs keep selling.
        It’s not just the border, Taliban are gaining strength in the North:

        Taliban overruns another district in the Afghan north
        The Taliban successfully overran the district of Tala Wa Barfak in the northern Afghan province of Baghlan today. Two other Afghan districts have been seized by the Taliban in the past two weeks, and several more have been threatened. All of that occurred as a Department of Defense spokesperson claimed last week that the Taliban is “desperate” and “losing ground.”
        https://www.longwarjournal.org/archi...ghan-north.php

        Comment


        • Cat and Mouse game as always. Fighting season comes and the Taliban goes on the offensive. The ANA reinforces the region and launches new offensive with US fire and air support. Area is cleared, Taliban disperses... then comes back again next Spring/Summer. Hell, some places in Helmand have changed hands basically every year or two.

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Lord Helmet View Post
            Cat and Mouse game as always. Fighting season comes and the Taliban goes on the offensive. The ANA reinforces the region and launches new offensive with US fire and air support. Area is cleared, Taliban disperses... then comes back again next Spring/Summer. Hell, some places in Helmand have changed hands basically every year or two.
            I hope you're right mate because the reports are not painting a pretty picture.

            Taliban Claim They’ve Taken Control of Western Afghan City, Farah

            KABUL, Afghanistan — The Taliban claimed to have captured the capital of the western province of Farah on Tuesday, while government officials and their American military backers vowed that the authorities would quickly oust insurgents from the city, the first to be overrun by the militants in two years.

            Only the provincial governor’s compound remained in government hands after a long day of fighting, which continued into the night, according to numerous residents and some local officials, as well as the Taliban insurgents. Gov. Basir Salangi fled the city after the insurgent attack began around 2 a.m., but he remained in Farah Province at a military base a few miles outside Farah city, according to numerous local officials.

            The fighting in Farah was part of a recent increase in the tempo of attacks by the insurgents, since their announcement of a spring offensive late in April and their explicit rejection of Afghan government peace initiatives.

            A senior Afghan police official, reached by telephone inside Farah City, described the government’s situation as “out of control” and predicted the insurgents would renew their offensive under cover of dark, when air support was less effective against them. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was contradicting official government reports.
            https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/15/w...an-farah-.html


            Taliban launches coordinated assault on Farah City

            The Afghan Taliban launched a large-scale assault overnight on the capital city of Farah province and overran an intelligence headquarters and several police checkpoints. Afghan security forces responded rapidly to the city to fight off the Taliban with support from Coalition aircraft and other assets.
            The Taliban assault on Farah City should put to rest any claims by the US military that the Taliban is losing ground in Afghanistan.

            Heavily armed Taliban fighters, using captured Afghan military HUMVEEs and police pickup trucks, launched the coordinated assault on Farah City overnight from multiple directions, according to local reports. ATN News reported that “at least three parts of the city came under the control of Taliban,” while Pajhwok Afghan News noted that “the rebels had captured the 3rd police district and stormed the intelligence department.” Taliban fighters also reportedly attacked the hospital and killed two police officers who were receiving treatment, and may also be advancing on the prison.

            Afghan officials and the Ministry of Defense have painted a brighter picture of the fighting in Farah City. According to MoD spokesman General Mohamamd Radmanish, Taliban forces have been stopped on the outskirts of the city and are two miles from the city center, Khaama Press reported. Radmanish noted that “a large number of militants have taken part in the attack” and “scores of militants have also joined the Taliban from the other parts of the country and the neighboring provinces.”

            Basir Salangi, the governor of Farah province, who took over in January after his predecessor resigned due to the deteriorating security situation, claimed the Taliban failed to capture any government buildings and will “soon they will be thwarted from the city.”

            “The situation is not concerning and with the arrival of commando forces they (Taliban) will be defeated Inshallah,” Salangi said, according to TOLONews.
            Resolute Support, NATO’s command in Afghanistan, also downplayed the Taliban assault on Farah City and claimed it “remains under govt. control.”
            “The ANDSF [Afghan National Defense Security Forces], supported by US Air Force, including US Air Force A-10s are on the offensive against Taliban,” the command tweeted.

            Resolute Support made similar claims when the Taliban overran Kunduz City in 2015 and 2016, and stated the city was under government control when in fact the Taliban occupied it.

            The Taliban is neither “desperate” nor “losing ground”

            Today’s assault on Farah City should put to rest the US military’s assertion that the Taliban is on the path to defeat. At a May 3 Pentagon press briefing Pentagon Chief Spokesperson Dana W. White described the Taliban as “desperate” because it is “losing ground.” Additionally, White said that over the last year, “things are moving in the right direction.”

            Yet, the Taliban has launched multiple attacks on district centers and now controls or contests nearly 59 percent of the country’s 407 districts, according to ongoing tracking by FDD’s Long War Journal. Farah City is one of several provincial capitals that is directly threatened by the Taliban. Ghazni City, Kunduz City, Lashkar Gah, and Tarin Kot are also directly threatened by the Taliban, which has amassed forces on its outskirts and controls or contests multiple districts around the city centers.

            Resolute Support has downplayed its assessments of the status of many of Afghanistan’s districts. For instance, Farah City is considered to be “government influenced,” yet the Taliban clearly have had the resources to threaten it (LWJ has long assessed Farah City to be contested). Ghazni City is considered “government controlled,” yet all reporting from the city indicates it si contested, or worse (LWJ also has long assessed Ghazni City to be contested).

            Resolute Support has also downplayed the Taliban’s control of more rural districts. At the end of March, Resolute Support spokesman Captain Tom Gresback claimed that Taliban operations in remote district centers “represent a significant lowering of ambition,” as the Taliban failed in its strategic goal of seizing provincial capitals.

            Gresback repeating what General John Nicholson, the commander of Resolute Support, said two months prior. In Jan. Nicholson claimed Afghan forces had a successful 2017 beacuse it “[denied] the Taliban any of their stated battlefield objectives … In 2017 the Taliban failed to take any provincial capitals.”
            However, Nicholoson falsely attributed a strategic goal to the Taliban that it never claimed. (For more background on this, see Afghan and Coalition forces prepare for 2018 offensive against the Taliban.)

            The Taliban has explicitly stated that part of its strategy is to take control of remote areas in order to pressure more populated areas, including district centers and provincial capitals. In fact, this strategy was explained by Mullah Aminullah Yousuf, the Taliban’s shadow governor for Uruzgan, in April 2016.
            Today’s assault on Farah City highlights the importance of the Taliban’s strategy to control rural areas, and the failure of the US military to properly acknowledge that threat.
            https://www.longwarjournal.org/archi...farah-city.php
            Last edited by HisRoyalHighness; 15-05-2018, 05:10 PM.

            Comment


            • Roger, I hear your concerns and the situation in Farah does loom dim. However, standby for reinforcements, advisers and air support to come in and launch combined arms offensive to retake city. Taliban will blend back into the countryside, regroup and try again elsewhere. Lets see what happens in the next few months. Its a never ending war and Afghanistan truly is hell. You keep killing them and they keep coming back out of a different hole later on. Remember how Kunduz fell and a few days later an offensive was launched? or how Lashkar Gah was being surrounded and then reinforcements came in and were able to alleviate the area as well as clear Nawa (south of Lashkar Gah).

              Here is a link, counteroffensive already underway to push Talib out:

              https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world...als/ar-AAxlHc4

              Even the bugs in Helmand were bigger than the bugs in America lol the wildlife is hostile AF.

              The Taliban is full of dudes who love goats and 7th century islam, even though they can't read. But the inshallah mentality of suicide isn't the day to day practice. They want to fight to win, they will pull back when needed and regroup somewhere else. As they say, all the dumb ones are already dead.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Lord Helmet View Post
                Roger, I hear your concerns and the situation in Farah does loom dim. However, standby for reinforcements, advisers and air support to come in and launch combined arms offensive to retake city. Taliban will blend back into the countryside, regroup and try again elsewhere. Lets see what happens in the next few months. Its a never ending war and Afghanistan truly is hell. You keep killing them and they keep coming back out of a different hole later on. Remember how Kunduz fell and a few days later an offensive was launched? or how Lashkar Gah was being surrounded and then reinforcements came in and were able to alleviate the area as well as clear Nawa (south of Lashkar Gah).

                Here is a link, counteroffensive already underway to push Talib out:

                https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world...als/ar-AAxlHc4

                Even the bugs in Helmand were bigger than the bugs in America lol the wildlife is hostile AF.

                The Taliban is full of dudes who love goats and 7th century islam, even though they can't read. But the inshallah mentality of suicide isn't the day to day practice. They want to fight to win, they will pull back when needed and regroup somewhere else. As they say, all the dumb ones are already dead.
                That's what's disturbing in my opinion.

                They are no longer the dumbass goat hearders who would rush the perimeter of an ISAF Firebase with bomb vests before getting turned into soup. They have adopted tactics that have increased the longevity of their fighters and as such are now retaining more experienced field commanders and fighters. Also they've become far more tech savy in their operations and are now employing drones, nightvison, captured uniforms, Google Maps, and social media in their operations as well as propaganda. Hell, they even have managed to create and utilize a cadre of shock troops who are more competent than the ANA's best non-special forces units.

                Overall, I think the DoD, NATO, and everyone else are all underestimating the ability of the Taliban to adapt and grow.

                Update:

                The good news is that the Taliban have retreated from Farrah.

                The bad news is that they've allegedly taken two districts:

                Sleight o' hand: While everyone is looking at Farah City, it appears that the Taliban overran Jaghatu district in Ghazni province and Muqur in Badghis. Not fully confirmed (reports indicate heavy fighting in Jaghatu), but Taliban is very credible on this particular issue.
                https://twitter.com/billroggio/statu...30403054002176
                After entering Farah City and then subsequently retreating, after seizing weapons and other war materials, the Taliban claimed it took control of two districts, one in Badghis province and another in Ghazni.

                In a statement released on Voice of Jihad, the Taliban said it took control of “Dara Boom district center, police headquarter and all the defensive check posts” in Badghis province after the “enemy fled.” Additionally, the Taliban claimed it overran the Jaghatu district in Ghazni province “after an intense gunfight of heavy and light arms.” The statement also said Taliban fighters captured “a sizable amount of war spoils” in Jaghatu.

                While neither claim can be independently confirmed in the Afghan press, the Taliban has been credible when it says it takes control of a district. There have been no reports of the Taliban taking “Dara Boom,” which appears to be Muqur district. Resolute Support assessed Muqur as contested, as recently as Jan. 31. LWJ has also assessed this district as contested.

                Recently, there have been reports of heavy fighting in the districts of Jaghatu and Dara Khan in Ghazni. From TOLONews:
                The clashes started on Tuesday night after dozens of Taliban insurgents attacked Zana Khan and Jaghato districts of the province, a member of the provincial council Hussain Reza Yousufi said.
                He claimed that 13 security forces, mostly police, were killed in Zana Khan and nine police were killed in Jaghato, adding that “heavy clashes are still ongoing in the district since last night and the Taliban insurgents have also suffered heavy casualties.”
                Resolute Support assessed Jaghatu as “government influenced” as recently as Jan. 31. LWJ did not have information available to properly assess the district.
                The Taliban has overrun five districts since it announced the beginning of its 2018 offensive. The Afghan government claimed it recaptured two of them, however the Taliban refutes the government’s assertions.

                LWJ assesses that the Taliban controls at least 40 of Afghanistan’s 407 districts, and contests another 203. See Mapping Taliban Control in Afghanistan for more information.

                Correction: Dara Boom was initially identified as Bala Murghab district, however it is Muqur district. The article was updated to reflect the change.
                https://www.longwarjournal.org/archi...-districts.php

                But enough of the bad, let's look at some more good news:

                US military kills ‘dual-hatted’ AQIS leader in eastern Afghanistan

                The US military confirmed that it killed al Qaeda leader Hazrat Abbas and his bodyguard in an airstrike in the eastern Afghan province of Nangarhar late last month. Abbas served as a senior commander for both al Qaeda in the Indian Subcontinent (AQIS) and the Movement of the Taliban in Pakistan (TTP). Abbas was killed in an airstrike in Sherzad district in Nangahar province on April 23, Resolute Support – NATO’s command in Afghanistan – announced yesterday. He was described as “a senior AQIS and Tehrik-e-Taliban Pakistan (TTP) commander” who “controlled fighting forces in both Pakistan and Afghanistan.”

                “Abbas’ forces were responsible for numerous attacks and kidnappings on both sides of the border,” Resolute Support noted.
                Abbas is what the US military refers to as one of the “dual hatted” jihadist commanders. The US military has targeted numerous multi-role al Qaeda and Taliban leaders over the past decade.

                Resolute Support properly identified the inter-connectiveness between al Qaeda, the Afghan and Pakistani Taliban, and a host of other terror organizations operating in the region.

                “Abbas’ integration and command of multiple organizations highlights the relationships between terrorist organizations in Afghanistan and the surrounding region, specifically how regional terrorist groups shelter and facilitate global threat networks,” NATO command concluded.

                AQIS, which was formed in 2014 by al Qaeda emir Ayman al Zawahiri and his son-in-law, Uthamn Basha, serves as bridge between a host of jihadist groups in Afghanistan, Pakistan, Indian, Burma, and Bangladesh. Basha was killed in a drone strike in 2015.

                “One of the most important works he [Basha] participated in, with the supervision and encouragement of the aforementioned Sheikhs, was uniting several jihadi groups belonging to the Indian Subcontinent,” Zawahiri said in a statement that eulogized his son-in law in early 2017.

                Zawahiri noted that AQIS fights “under the banner of the Islamic Emirate,” or the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan, the official name the Taliban has given to itself.

                “Allah guided him [Basha] to avail his old relationships that had been formed with the Mujahideen of the Subcontinent in training camps and fronts,” Zawahiri continued in his eulogy. “Allah had given him popularity amongst them, so he directed his efforts to unite these different groups in a single organization, and thus, with the blessing and favor of Allah, al Qaeda in the Indian Subcontinent was formed, under the banner of the Islamic Emirate.”

                Zahahiri publicly swore allegiance to the Taliban’s previous two emirs, and AQIS’s code of conduct says its members are currently fighting “shoulder-to-shoulder with the mujahideen” of the Taliban and calls on Muslims throughout the subcontinent to join or support the “Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan.”
                The al Qaeda-TTP relationship is also well-documented. Files seized from Osama bin Laden’s compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan, shows al Qaeda leaders asserting their authority over the leader of the TTP and helping the group write its charter.

                AQIS continues to fight alongside the Taliban in Afghanistan, and its presence in the country has been underestimated by US political leaders and military and intelligence officials for nearly a decade. Between 2010 and 2015, US officials consistently claimed that al Qaeda had only 50 to 100 fighters in Afghanistan and was confined to the northeastern provinces of Kunar and Nuristan. This estimate was proven wildly inaccurate when in Oct. 2015 US forces killed more than 200 al Qaeda operatives in an attack on two al Qaeda training camps in the southern province of Kandahar.
                Last edited by HisRoyalHighness; 16-05-2018, 02:05 PM.

                Comment


                • Yup, called it. Its the cat and mouse game from every spring offensive. Wait for those districts to be recovered over the next few weeks or months, then at the same time another two fall. Then transition back to the rest season and let the winter hit. Then do it all over again... for the 19th year in a row.

                  Comment


                  • Taliban operations span the entire country, Afghan Interior Ministry confirms

                    The Taliban is operating in all regions of Afghanistan and casualties among Afghan police have increased, according to the Ministry of Interior (MoI). The MoI statements confirm reporting by FDD’s Long War Journal and contradicts a recent press briefing by General John Nicholson, the outgoing commander of Resolute Support and US Forces- Afghanistan.
                    The Taliban has launched “military offensives on multiple fronts across the country” and security forces “are tackling insurgents as part of their preplanned operations in at least 14 provinces,” TOLONews reported based on statements made by the spokesman for the MoI.
                    “This year the activities of the enemy has increased compared to previous years. The number of our operations also indicates that this year the number of casualties unfortunately has also increased,” MoI spokesman Najib Danish said, according to TOLONews.
                    TOLONews claims that its sources within the Interior Ministry state that “currently on average 50 members of the security forces are being killed and wounded each day.”
                    Danish’s statement that the Taliban is operating in all areas of the country confirms a mid-May report by published by FDD’s Long War Journal. In that report, LWJ determined that the Taliban has targeted Afghan government forces in nearly all of Afghanistan’s 34 provinces, as the military focuses on the Taliban threat in Helmand and Kandahar. Additionally, LWJ reported, based on statements from Afghanistan’s Ministry of Defense, that the Taliban directly threaten seven provincial capitals.
                    Additionally, the MoI’s confirmation that the Taliban is on the offensive is backed by data compiled by LWJ on the status of Afghanistan’s districts. Currently the Taliban controls or contests 60 percent of Afghanistan’s 407 districts.
                    These statements directly contradict the highly optimistic assessment of the situation in Afghanistan given by Nicholson, as well as statements by Pentagon Spokesperson Dana White, who has described the Taliban as “desperate,” and said it “has lost ground” and “has not had the initiative.”

                    For more information, see the following LWJ reports:
                    Taliban’s 2018 offensive encompasses all regions of Afghanistan

                    Afghan military identifies 7 provincial capitals ‘under pressure’

                    ‘Desperate’ Taliban ‘has lost ground,’ Pentagon spokesperson wrongly claims

                    Pentagon spokesperson doubles down on ‘desperate’ Taliban comment

                    Comment


                    • Taliban operations span the entire country, Afghan Interior Ministry confirms
                      Oh the humanity! Who could have foreseen so woeful a development?

                      My brother served in Afghanistan as a medic. He wasn't an instructor himself, but saw their poor perfomance first-hand and in his estimation, only like one or two in five Afghans have what it takes merely to secure the status quo. Not only were many Afghans stoned six ways from sunday, they also lacked fundamental skills and competence.

                      Decades of effective anarchy undeniably took a heavy toll on that country (as did the similar conditions on Somalia).

                      He said he'd seen Afghans who – after weeks of training – still couldn't follow simple orders 'cause they'd never been teached to respect authority. He knows cases where Afghan enlisted personnel took criticism as an "assault" on their "honor" and violently attacked their superiors or instructors.

                      Just to enable joint operations in theory, the first thing German advisors had to do at a great expense was teaching the Afghans the importance of being on time. Every now and again, they didn't show up regardless. Others did but were accidentally gunned down due to their unrelenting failure to follow orders *when* to approach and *how*.

                      Much like a teacher at a social hot spot's school can't fix all the damage done by bad parenting and a poisonous social environment, our lads and lasses over there won't be able to get the Afghan ship afloat again anytime soon. What is being done now is a waste of time and ressources. NATO's deployment should've either been kept at 2010-ish levels, or be shut down completely.

                      Comment


                      • The Afghan army is a mixture of people collecting a paycheck who don't care at all about being soldiers (the majority), drug addicts ( a lot of them) and hardcore dudes who have been at war their entire lives (the few who rise up to become NCOs and officers). The honor thing is far and in between from what I saw in 2010-2012, most guys are just there to cash their checks and try to stay alive as long as they can. Being an illiterate farmer and then going through a few months of basic military skills doesn't make them less of an illiterate farmer unfortunately. The religious extremists keep coming, the Taliban pays their guys the same way the ANA pays theirs. Everyone is in the war just to make some cash. Only the leadership has real motives. The Afghan war will last forever, until the US decides to pull the plug. Only 2011 troop levels can make a real impact.

                        As I like to say... "Afghanistan, we were winning when I left"

                        Comment


                        • http://www.foxnews.com/world/2018/06...?cmpid=prn_msn

                          The Taliban in Afghanistan once dug underground tunnels and staged suicide bombings to spring their members from jail, all to get their forces back in action against U.S. and the Afghan government.

                          But these days, the group can simply exploit loopholes reserved for the old and sick: bribing and intimidating health officials for early release.

                          Comment


                          • US service member killed in Afghanistan, fourth in 2018
                            R.I.P.

                            Here : https://edition.cnn.com/2018/07/12/p...tan/index.html

                            Comment


                            • Islamic State releases photos from Jowzjan battles with the Taliban

                              Earlier today the Islamic State released a photo-set from recent clashes with the Taliban in Afghanistan’s northern Jowzjan province. Scores of jihadists have been killed on both sides in the past two weeks.

                              The photos mainly show Islamic State snipers targeting Taliban positions in Jowzjan, however, others also show mortars being fired at the same positions. The short photo series is the first to be released of battles with the Taliban since renewed fighting began this week. Photos of earlier strikes in Jowzjan have previously been released.

                              Like other rounds of conflict with the Islamic State, the Taliban has not publicly commented on the offensives.

                              Fighting renewed between the jihadist groups earlier this month after Islamic State militants stormed Taliban positions in Darzab, a hotly contested district which is no stranger to battle among these groups. After capturing a Taliban-held town, the Islamic State then beheaded 10 captured Taliban members. As a result, the Taliban targeted Islamic State positions in Darzab and Qush Tepa, as well as another contested district in Jawzjan on July 12.

                              Then on July 16, at least six Taliban fighters and four from the Islamic State were reportedly killed in clashes in Darzab. On the 17th, another skirmish between the two left a further 15 jihadists dead in the Sayyad district of Sar-i-Pul.

                              The Islamic State also captured a Taliban commander, Mullah Burjan, and subsequently beheaded him after another strike in Darzab also on the 17th. Afghan officials have reported that after the beheading, increased Taliban skirmishes with Islamic State-loyal militants have occurred in Darzab. The same officials have said at least 250 jihadists have been killed in the fighting, however, the accuracy of this estimate is questionable. [For more background on the clashes between the jihadist groups in Jowzjan, see FDD’s Long War Journal report, “Taliban, Islamic State continue battle in northern Afghanistan.”]

                              The ongoing fighting between the Islamic State and the Taliban in Jawzjan and Sar-i-pul has hampered the Taliban’s campaign in the northern provinces, as it has forced it to divert forces to deal with the upstart jihadist group. Additionally, the Islamic State’s ability to mass and occasionally control territory threatens the Taliban’s narrative that it is the only legitimate opposition to the Afghan government.
                              Hopefully they keep killing each other.

                              Comment


                              • Hah! Stupid fucktards!

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X