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What is Armor Piercing Ammunition?

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  • What is Armor Piercing Ammunition?

    considering a 55 year old guy (Douglas Haig) was just charged with not having a license to manufacture armor piercing rounds and selling about 700 rounds of same to the Paddock murderer of the Vegas shooting massacre recently......one may have some questions about what EXACTLY is armor piercing ammo, what is it made of, who sells it, is it legal to own or make?

    http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2...ng-ammunition/

    (i) a projectile or projectile core which may be used in a handgun and which is constructed entirely (excluding the presence of traces of other substances) from one or a combination of tungsten alloys, steel, iron, brass, bronze, beryllium copper, or depleted uranium; or.... ii) a full jacketed projectile larger than .22 caliber designed and intended for use in a handgun and whose jacket has a weight of more than 25 percent of the total weight of the projectile
    much more at link above.......

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    I remember buying a few boxes of steel core 7.62x39mm Norinco ammo in the 1990s for one of the first SKS rifles from Norinco I bought back then, which unknowingly was "armor piercing".

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    http://abcnews.go.com/US/man-charged...ry?id=52807551

    However, among the unfired rounds found in Paddock’s hotel room were two cartridges which forensic analysis determined were armor-piercing/incendiary ammo that had Haig’s fingerprints on them, the complaint states. Such ammunition is illegal to manufacture without a license
    Last edited by commanding; 03-02-2018, 04:55 AM.

  • #2
    In one news story Haig sold 700+ rounds of tracers to the killer. Any way Haig is SOL

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Hollis View Post
      In one news story Haig sold 700+ rounds of tracers to the killer. Any way Haig is SOL
      which, IMO.....proves the statement some have made recently, if the law WANTS to charge you with something, they will find something. Reading the article I linked to, the definition of armor piercing can /does vary greatly, and it has been legally sold in local ATF approved gun shops in the 1990s in volume.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Hollis View Post
        In one news story Haig sold 700+ rounds of tracers to the killer. Any way Haig is SOL
        BTW, ....the first story I saw on this, also stated in one article first that it was 700 rds of AP and then said 700 rds of incendiary

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        • #5
          commanding, Yes, if they want you, they will have you. Also the media in it's clueless way post crap just to fill the time slot or column.

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          • #6
            I recently got rid of about 300 rounds of 30-06 tracer that I’d accidentally bought. I also had a bunch of AP rounds that I got rid of as my new range prohibits them.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by TheKiwi View Post
              I recently got rid of about 300 rounds of 30-06 tracer that I’d accidentally bought. I also had a bunch of AP rounds that I got rid of as my new range prohibits them.
              LOL.....the Commercial pay for shoot/ outdoor range we sometimes use, will not even allow FMJ rifle rounds, only soft tip , will not allow even on the grounds of the range, they check your shooting bag and if you have FMJ they boot you out until they are gone (stored in your truck etc). only soft tip allowed. FMJ handgun ammo is okay, the range officers heads would melt if they saw AP.

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              • #8
                I can understand banning tracer. In summer it can get pretty dry. But AP is weird. All the embankments are more than thick enough.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by TheKiwi View Post
                  I can understand banning tracer. In summer it can get pretty dry. But AP is weird. All the embankments are more than thick enough.
                  well so is essentially banning suppressors (via paying a license/ tax fee of crazy amount and requiring long and crazy paperwork approval etc) but that is the result of a long time US law based on 1930s Hollywood movies showing gangsters using "Tommy guns" and suppressors on "revolvers" and shotguns etc.

                  once a law is passed, it stays in effect until some sane person IN CHARGE understands the benefits and drawbacks.

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                  • #10
                    Wait, so FMJ rounds iis Armour piercing for a handgun? But not in a rifle?

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by t3ngu View Post
                      Wait, so FMJ rounds iis Armour piercing for a handgun? But not in a rifle?
                      are you talking about what you read in my linked article? http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2...ng-ammunition/

                      if so yes that is the way I read it. The federal laws on this are very complex and disjointed.



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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by TheKiwi View Post
                        I can understand banning tracer. In summer it can get pretty dry. But AP is weird. All the embankments are more than thick enough.
                        The UK has some pretty restrictive firearms laws, but the ranges tend to be relatively sensible. That or the fact many shooting clubs rent military ranges on a weekend means they can't really ban the same stuff the army was shooting all week.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by TheKiwi View Post
                          I can understand banning tracer. In summer it can get pretty dry. But AP is weird. All the embankments are more than thick enough.
                          It depends upon the kind of AP and backstop. Most indoor ranges ban anything steel jacketed or real world armor penetrating such as solid bronze due to potential backstop damage. The same goes for outdoor ranges with steel targets. Dirt backstops are sort of a case by case basis. For instance, the club to which I belong permits steel jacket and core on the bench rest range, but I won't use it in dry weather as there is a lot of chert (flint and chert are basically the same) in the backstop. Anything steel that hits that is likely to cause a spark and a spark in dry brush is bad thing.

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