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  • #76
    Originally posted by gaz View Post
    Textron announce new large-utility turboprop, the Cessna Skycourier

    https://investor.textron.com/news/ne...r/default.aspx

    Quite a departure from Cessna's existing line of products and am surprised that Textron didn't choose to do this on the Beech brand of their products since it basically looks like a Beech 1900 replacement.
    The cargo version will probably find some military costumers.

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    • #77
      Originally posted by picanha View Post
      If they can come up with something exceptionally better than AB - sure. Then they just have to build, deliver and support it. In the numbers. Easy.
      In reality it is quite complex and and very hard. I am sceptical the Airbus project was regarded as new on the market. But many forget that it built up on top notch engineering having already created groundbreaking modern a/c like the Comet, Caravelle and Concorde and could draw upon a see of knowledge and experience enabling them to lay out very progressive designs.
      True Bro, Yes, European had a very good aircraft industries however, people only talk about Airbus, wish there were two rival company in the Europe then it sure would have been interesting to see, sad how fokker end up as bankrupt company. Why, I was talking few days ago regarding the political rant in other thread, their is a whopping order for China new narrow body jet but, some say it will not succeed in global market as by the time it get into production it is already 15 something obsolete to western design.
      Support can be said about Dash Q-400 is a very good aircraft however, they always loose to the ATR cause their after service is really bad and the client has to sent to far places to get fixed, so support is very critical in aircraft industries it seem.

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      • #78
        Textron Launches New SkyCourier Turboprop With Cargo, Pax Versions

        http://aviationweek.com/business-avi...o-pax-versions

        Nice. FedEx is still using the Caravan from Honolulu to the smaller islands and airfields, although we see them less often than before.


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        • #79
          Originally posted by gaz View Post

          Dassault chose an engine that wasn't actually in production yet - the Snecma Silvercrest from Safran. Safran hit problems developing the engine and that fed through to the 5X. Dassault have reported order cancellations due to the delay and are apparently chasing Safran for compensation for it - they'll be looking for a big number, it's allegedly twelve cancellations at 40 or 50 million dollars per aircraft.

          5X programme is cancelled - https://www.flightglobal.com/news/ar...els-fa-444150/

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          • #80
            A skilled pilot embraced the Christmas spirit with a festive stunt while flying over Germany and Denmark.

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            • #81
              Airbus may stop making A380 as demand is too low.

              http://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/01...80_production/

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              • #82
                Originally posted by TheKiwi View Post
                Airbus may stop making A380 as demand is too low.

                http://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/01...80_production/
                I doubt it will stop anytime soon. It's by far the most comfortable long hauler on the market today(can fly through serious bad weather without anyone noticing it). A350 and 787 are really nice planes, perfect for eg. transatlantic flight. Wouldn't wanna do that in A321 thou.. Have only tried an A330 once, from Singapore to Bali. A quite nice ride as far as I can remember.

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                • #83
                  They seem to currently be only making 7 or 8 per year whereas they need to be making at least 25 per year for it to be profitable.

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                  • #84
                    Originally posted by TheKiwi View Post
                    They seem to currently be only making 7 or 8 per year whereas they need to be making at least 25 per year for it to be profitable.
                    So.. what's the reason? Simply too big??

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                    • #85
                      Some of that to be sure. But from what I've read it's more than airlines changed their operating patterns between when the A380 was conceived and when it started operations. Now they run more smaller direct site to site flights and that is where the growth has been in the industry rather than more flights into main hubs. Obviously the more passengers you can cram into a hub at once the more efficient you will be, but when running with smaller site to site links you want smaller but more efficient aircraft.

                      I gather that the A350 has grabbed a lot of that type of traffic.

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                      • #86
                        The A380 hasn't been used to its full potential until now. It could be a real game changer.

                        I would operate some A380s in high density config and offer regular tickets for 300 € return FRA- JFK for example.

                        Many would hop on it for that price.


                        Malaysian started to put 700 seats in them for pilgrimage flights through their lessor DORIC.


                        https://www.flightglobal.com/news/ar...eating-435924/


                        The operators seem very content with it though. It is also, like The Dane mentioned, very comfortable for the passenger and rides very smooth due to its size.


                        I think a combination of low price and a bit more space for the economy passenger could be promising. Low price more personal space and a streamlined catering concept can make money.

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                        • #87
                          I did read that there are many reports of too much wake turbulence events in airports welcoming many A380´s: Dubai for example.

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                          • #88
                            On a slight tangent, last year a Bombardier Challenger business jet hit wake turbulence of an A380 and ended up barrel rolling several times and rapidly lost altitude. It landed safely with injuries to those onboard but the aircraft was later written off due to the stress placed on the airframe - it was sold for parts last month.

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                            • #89
                              I guessed A380 is way too BIG unless the whole seat is full it is a lost and the loss ratio for A380 must be too high and also traveler seems to preferred point to point travel than hub to hub, I think category of A330 or B777 seem to be a perfect size and doing well, and being supplemented by B787 and A350.

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                              • #90
                                I don't think it is an issue. The wake turbulences require a bit larger separation. If an aircraft hits some it was the crews fault not adhering to separation rules.

                                Originally posted by thounaojamtom View Post
                                I guessed A380 is way too BIG unless the whole seat is full it is a lost and the loss ratio for A380 must be too high and also traveler seems to preferred point to point travel than hub to hub, I think category of A330 or B777 seem to be a perfect size and doing well, and being supplemented by B787 and A350.
                                It is about CASM (Cost per Available Seat Mile) and stuff like that. The more seats you have the better. And the less grave that you have no full load.

                                A high density A380 beats every aircraft in CASM. Even the 777-X.

                                I think they are working on it, the article I linked above for example shows the new space saving staircase (NFS).


                                Here again a similar article and the staircase redesign:


                                https://airwaysmag.com/manufacturer/...stairs-option/

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