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Retired-U.S. Army Green Service Uniform

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  • Retired-U.S. Army Green Service Uniform

    Article is several months old, however I know our international members will be interested in this.

    http://www.armytimes.com/story/milit...2015/73142376/

    The green service uniform has finally been laid to rest after 61 years of approved wear, the vast majority of that stretch as the service uniform that defined the Army.
    As of Oct. 1, (2015) the "Green Class A's" are no longer permitted for wear.
    From 1902 through World War II soldiers wore an olive and/or khaki/tan combination of some sort. But then the Army wanted a sharp, classic and dignified look to distinguish soldiers in a postwar era.
    Enter the Army Green Uniform in 1954. The dark green color ("shade 44") was a throwback to the distinctive color for rifle units back in Revolutionary times, and was recommended to the Army by scientists and fashion experts.

    P.S-full-color shoulder patch's (signifying Numbered Army, Corp, Command, Division, Brigade, or Regiment) are no longer worn.

  • #2
    Interesting info haze. When I was in,we had to wear class A green uniform when flying commercial airlines.
    Am always interested in army history

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    • #3
      So, after doing away with full-color embroidered shoulder patch's in 2011, they will return with this uniform? Great!

      https://www.armytimes.com/news/your-...he-army-needs/

      “The jersey of the greatest team on earth” is how the 2012 “More Than a Uniform” ad rightly described the uniform of the United States Army. As the “pinks and greens” prototype uniform debuted at this week’s Association of the U.S. Army convention, and as the baseball postseason descends on us, we are reminded that throwback jerseys are always the appropriate choice to not only show pride in a team, but also in that team’s storied history.


      Pinks and greens are the must-have throwback uniform of the U.S. Army at its finest: the 1945 world championship team that left it all on the field in a nerve-wracking, seven-game slog that awes us even today.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by haze99 View Post
        So, after doing away with full-color embroidered shoulder patch's in 2011, they will return with this uniform? Great!

        https://www.armytimes.com/news/your-...he-army-needs/

        “The jersey of the greatest team on earth” is how the 2012 “More Than a Uniform” ad rightly described the uniform of the United States Army. As the “pinks and greens” prototype uniform debuted at this week’s Association of the U.S. Army convention, and as the baseball postseason descends on us, we are reminded that throwback jerseys are always the appropriate choice to not only show pride in a team, but also in that team’s storied history.


        Pinks and greens are the must-have throwback uniform of the U.S. Army at its finest: the 1945 world championship team that left it all on the field in a nerve-wracking, seven-game slog that awes us even today.
        I saw that news with photos also of the pinks and greens. The female uniform didn't look the same to me for some reason, maybe my memory sucks. The full color shoulder patch, IMO, was important and held importance, the colors mean things, and even though the subdued patch is most often worn....the color ones should be worn on dress uniforms IMO.
        But they don't ask me. LOL....

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        • #5
          These changes might have something to do with trying to increase recruitment.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by merkwurdig View Post
            These changes might have something to do with trying to increase recruitment.
            Everything has to do with recruitment.

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            • #7
              Finally. The old Class A uniform that we had was, kind of meh. The new blue uniform never did look quite right to me. Fortunately I was out before that one hit. This one actually looks good.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by commanding View Post
                Everything has to do with recruitment.
                That would explain the pink, although after a quick look at the provided link, it didn't seem too inappropriate. RIP, dress greens.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by merkwurdig View Post

                  That would explain the pink, although after a quick look at the provided link, it didn't seem too inappropriate. RIP, dress greens.
                  regarding recruiting......and the uniforms...why do you think the Marine Corps wears those white saucer caps? It ain't for camouflage purposes.
                  illustration: http://wearethemighty.wpengine.netdn...0-1024x576.jpg

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by commanding View Post

                    regarding recruiting......and the uniforms...why do you think the Marine Corps wears those white saucer caps? It ain't for camouflage purposes.
                    illustration: http://wearethemighty.wpengine.netdn...0-1024x576.jpg
                    Hate to tell the USMC this, but the NK's have bigger caps.

                    Looking at the variety of dress uniforms from the Napoleonic period, there's definitely a history in flash.

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                    • #11
                      I can't help but think of Cpl. Klinger and his "dress" uniforms.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by commanding View Post

                        regarding recruiting......and the uniforms...why do you think the Marine Corps wears those white saucer caps? It ain't for camouflage purposes.
                        illustration: http://wearethemighty.wpengine.netdn...0-1024x576.jpg
                        White caps originally for summer and dark blue for winter changed IIRC in 1948 when the unit patches were also banned. US Navy also did it in the late 50's for a white cover at all times

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Linedoggie View Post
                          White caps originally for summer and dark blue for winter changed IIRC in 1948 when the unit patches were also banned. US Navy also did it in the late 50's for a white cover at all times
                          rhetorical question, explain this: http://er3eb.tripod.com/zouaves.jpg

                          was for fashion or military necessity?

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                          • #14
                            Looks good. Old school classy.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by haze99 View Post
                              P.S-full-color shoulder patch's (signifying Numbered Army, Corp, Command, Division, Brigade, or Regiment) are no longer worn.
                              What was the reason behind this choice?

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